PortadaGruposCharlasMásPanorama actual
Buscar en el sitio
Este sitio utiliza cookies para ofrecer nuestros servicios, mejorar el rendimiento, análisis y (si no estás registrado) publicidad. Al usar LibraryThing reconoces que has leído y comprendido nuestros términos de servicio y política de privacidad. El uso del sitio y de los servicios está sujeto a estas políticas y términos.

Resultados de Google Books

Pulse en una miniatura para ir a Google Books.

Cargando...

Ruido de fondo (1984)

por Don DeLillo

MiembrosReseñasPopularidadValoración promediaConversaciones / Menciones
11,034173618 (3.78)1 / 361
Jack Gladney, un profesor universitario especializado en estudios sobre Hitler, vive en una pequeña ciudad americana con Babette, su cuarta esposa, y los hijos que ambos han tenido de anteriores matrimonios. Marcados por el consumismo y el miedo a la muerte, los Gladney tratan de llevar una vida familiar tranquila cuando un terrible accidente industrial provoca un «escape tóxico a la atmósfera», una nube de gases letales que amenaza su ciudad. Don DeLillo capta toda la extrañeza de la existencia humana en el mundo contemporáneo. La nube tóxica es una versión más visible y apremiante de ese ruido de fondo que rodea a los Gladney y a todos nosotros: el murmullo incesante de la televisión, las transmisiones de radio, las sirenas, las ondas ultrasónicas y electrónicas, todas esas señales omnipresentes que nos hechizan y nos paralizan. En palabras de DeLillo: «Una historia sobre el miedo, la muerte y la tecnología. Una comedia, por supuesto.» Ganadora del National Book Award en 1985, Ruido de fondo es un clásico de la novela americana y, junto a Submundo, la obra más representativa de uno de los más aclamados narradores contemporáneos. De ella se ha dicho: «Una de las obras más divertidas de Don DeLillo... Escalofriante, brillante y conmovedora», The New York Times; «La novela más audaz y original de los últimos tiempos», Chicago Tribune; «Una obra sensacional de uno de nuestros novelistas más inteligentes», The New Republic.… (más)
  1. 31
    Crash por J. G. Ballard (ateolf)
  2. 31
    Ubik por Philip K. Dick (ateolf)
  3. 10
    Ensayo sobre la ceguera por José Saramago (chrisharpe)
  4. 11
    Submundo por Don DeLillo (David_Cain)
    David_Cain: Everything good in White Noise is better in Underworld
hopes (14)
My TBR (47)
Cargando...

Inscríbete en LibraryThing para averiguar si este libro te gustará.

» Ver también 361 menciones

Inglés (166)  Finlandés (2)  Sueco (1)  Hebreo (1)  Italiano (1)  Todos los idiomas (171)
Mostrando 1-5 de 171 (siguiente | mostrar todos)
A Prescient Novel We've Learned Nothing From

The novel is listed on "The Greatest Books.org", and won the National Book Award. My copy had
a long and thoughtful forward, and about 100 pages of afterword analysis and interviews with the author. I acknowledge that the author wrote an insightful satire of late 20th century life...specifically consumerism, mass media and academia. The FEAR of DEATH is more than a a theme in the story. It is a character. The fear of death inspires adultery and attempted murder, among other poor life choices we allegedly make in order to suppress it.
Although it is thought provoking, I found it depressing and anxiety producing. Glad to be finished with it. ( )
  Chrissylou62 | Apr 11, 2024 |
One of DeLillo's best. ( )
  ben_r47 | Feb 22, 2024 |
White Noise - 1: a constant background noise especially one that drowns out other sounds. 2: meaningless or distracting commotion, hubbub, or chatter.

Both definitions are themes played out in Don DeLillo’s novel: the constant background noise in this instance, the excessive and obsessive fear of death felt by the protagonist Jack Gladney and his wife; the meaningless or disturbing commotion, America in the late 80s/ early 90s coming to terms with modern society’s newest influences: supermarkets, television, educational expertise, scientific and medical advancements and the such like.

Despite themes of mortality and death, White Noise is surprisingly a comic novel (albeit a dark one). We are flies on the wall of a typical, atypical American family unit. Jack and Babette and their various children from a series of previously failed marriages bungle through life together. As the story progresses, the spectres of death and modernity begin to flavour domestic life and husband and wife become more and more unhinged.

There is a very Vonnegutian feel to the novel: despite the dramatic events they face, their responses are deadpan and passive - as the novel progresses we gather more and more evidence that DeLillo's characters are not the good parents, responsible citizens or self-aware individuals we assume they are. Numerous failed marriages (twice to the same person) professorships in Hitler studies, couples copies of Mein Kampf, obsessive concerns with who will die first and trips/ harassment of doctors for crying babies and psychosomatic symptoms could perhaps be considered disturbing, but are in fact humorous in their ridiculousness - especially complemented in the way they are quite normal and serious concerns to the characters. The fears, idiosyncrasies and psychosis’s continue to surface and Jack and Babette slowly unravel.

The book works because mortality is an element of the human condition, one which we all have perhaps pondered at points in our lives and hence it is easy to empathise with the Gladneys. They are mirrors for us to take a self-depreciatory laugh at ourselves and meditate and experience our transience vicariously. White Noise is an entertaining and interesting novel rich with potential interpretation and discussion - one I would've liked to buddy read due to the amount of 'stuff' to chew on. I'm happy with my first DeLillo read and look forward to his others which I have on the shelves, namely Underworld, The Names and Libra. ( )
  Dzaowan | Feb 15, 2024 |
I reread this in anticipation the Noah Baumbach film. My keenness for the that has diminished a bit because for the second time in a week I have come back to a text I was blown away by on a first reading to find it a pale shadow of the form in my mind. As with Cunningham's The Hours I can absolutely appreciate the novelty and the daring which created such an initial impact but it feels now both dated and overiterated - to death almost. I found myself thinking that this is the sort of thing JG Ballard could have produced if he'd had a sense of humour and anything approaching stylistic panache. Oh well. (3) ( )
  djh_1962 | Jan 7, 2024 |
A richly and originally written novel about the uncertainties in life that worry us. From the near-universal like mortality and keeping our kids safe, to the modern concerns of chemicals and rampant consumerism, there are a lot of anxieties wrapped in the characters' lives, and it is sometimes uncomfortable how much time they spend obsessing about each one. I would like to have seen a little more color in the lives of the children themselves, who felt like almost complete characters but deserved a little more focus. Since its publication, I think this novel still keeps a current feel that could be eminently relatable in 2023. ( )
  jonerthon | Dec 24, 2023 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 171 (siguiente | mostrar todos)
The book is so funny, so mysterious, so right, so disturbing … and yet so enjoyable it has somehow survived being cut open for twenty-five years by critics and post-grads. All of that theoretical poking and prodding, all of that po-mo-simulacra-ambiguity vivisection can’t touch the thrill of reading it
 
''White Noise,'' his eighth novel, is the story of a college professor and his family whose small Midwestern town is evacuated after an industrial accident. In light of the recent Union Carbide disaster in India that killed over 2,000 and injured thousands more, ''White Noise'' seems all the more timely and frightening - precisely because of its totally American concerns, its rendering of a particularly American numbness.
 
Debes iniciar sesión para editar los datos de Conocimiento Común.
Para más ayuda, consulta la página de ayuda de Conocimiento Común.
Título canónico
Información procedente del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Información procedente del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Fecha de publicación original
Personas/Personajes
Información procedente del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Lugares importantes
Acontecimientos importantes
Películas relacionadas
Información procedente del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Epígrafe
Dedicatoria
Información procedente del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
To Sue Buck and to Lois Wallace
Primeras palabras
Información procedente del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
The station wagons arrived at noon, a long shining line that coursed through the west campus.
Citas
Información procedente del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
"The greater the scientific advance, the more primitive the fear". Jack to Babette when talking about genetically engineered micro-organisms that would digest the 'airborne toxic event'.
"The airborne toxic event is a horrifying thing. Our fear is enormous. Even if there hasn't been great loss of life, don't we deserve some attention for our suffering, our human worry, our terror? Isn't fear news?" Television carrying man's speech when the family is stranded in Iron City.
Últimas palabras
Información procedente del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Aviso de desambiguación
Editores de la editorial
Blurbistas
Información procedente del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Idioma original
Información procedente del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
DDC/MDS Canónico
LCC canónico

Referencias a esta obra en fuentes externas.

Wikipedia en inglés

Ninguno

Jack Gladney, un profesor universitario especializado en estudios sobre Hitler, vive en una pequeña ciudad americana con Babette, su cuarta esposa, y los hijos que ambos han tenido de anteriores matrimonios. Marcados por el consumismo y el miedo a la muerte, los Gladney tratan de llevar una vida familiar tranquila cuando un terrible accidente industrial provoca un «escape tóxico a la atmósfera», una nube de gases letales que amenaza su ciudad. Don DeLillo capta toda la extrañeza de la existencia humana en el mundo contemporáneo. La nube tóxica es una versión más visible y apremiante de ese ruido de fondo que rodea a los Gladney y a todos nosotros: el murmullo incesante de la televisión, las transmisiones de radio, las sirenas, las ondas ultrasónicas y electrónicas, todas esas señales omnipresentes que nos hechizan y nos paralizan. En palabras de DeLillo: «Una historia sobre el miedo, la muerte y la tecnología. Una comedia, por supuesto.» Ganadora del National Book Award en 1985, Ruido de fondo es un clásico de la novela americana y, junto a Submundo, la obra más representativa de uno de los más aclamados narradores contemporáneos. De ella se ha dicho: «Una de las obras más divertidas de Don DeLillo... Escalofriante, brillante y conmovedora», The New York Times; «La novela más audaz y original de los últimos tiempos», Chicago Tribune; «Una obra sensacional de uno de nuestros novelistas más inteligentes», The New Republic.

No se han encontrado descripciones de biblioteca.

Descripción del libro
Resumen Haiku

Debates activos

Ninguno

Cubiertas populares

Enlaces rápidos

Valoración

Promedio: (3.78)
0.5 9
1 67
1.5 17
2 182
2.5 45
3 568
3.5 134
4 905
4.5 113
5 678

¿Eres tú?

Conviértete en un Autor de LibraryThing.

 

Acerca de | Contactar | LibraryThing.com | Privacidad/Condiciones | Ayuda/Preguntas frecuentes | Blog | Tienda | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas heredadas | Primeros reseñadores | Conocimiento común | 206,040,475 libros! | Barra superior: Siempre visible