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Salt : a world history por Mark Kurlansky
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Salt : a world history (edición 2002)

por Mark Kurlansky

MiembrosReseñasPopularidadValoración promediaMenciones
6,1341681,631 (3.73)223
La sal ha influenciado en la configuración de nuestra civilización desde sus inicios.La obra sintetiza a través de la sal la historia de la humanidad.
Miembro:Suavead83
Título:Salt : a world history
Autores:Mark Kurlansky
Información:New York : Walker and Co., ©2002.
Colecciones:Tu biblioteca, Por leer
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Información de la obra

Sal: historia de la única piedra comestible por Mark Kurlansky

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» Ver también 223 menciones

Inglés (165)  Holandés (1)  Todos los idiomas (166)
Mostrando 1-5 de 166 (siguiente | mostrar todos)
A fun and informative read. The history of salt is especially interesting since it plays a role in all of human history. Unfortunately, Kulansky's research skills might be questioned just a bit - he has Joseph Smith being murdered by a mob in 1846. It was June 27th of 1844, a fact that could easily have been verified. This faux pas may have been attributable less to his research skills and more to his level of interest and engagement, since he also sluffed off the history of the Great Salt Lake and blthely stated that the salt from the lake was a mainstay of the Mormon economy. Nonetheless, the book is a nice addition to my library. ( )
  BlaueBlume | Jun 12, 2024 |
I read this book many years ago but as I received it as a gift from my younger child, it was time to read it again. Despite the seasoning of decades it holds up as a good book. Salt, which the author notes is "the only rock we eat," plays a vital role in human history and culture. At times this book reads like someone who knows a lot about salt and has decided to tell you all about it in detail, but in the most fascinating way possible. For foodies, Kurlansky also includes recipes using salt from across time and cultures.

There's way too much to summarize here, but my favorite part involves Avery Island in Lousiana. The island is actually a salt dome, and there's a curious connection between salt domes and petroleum. In the case of Avery Island, people have not only exploited it for salt and oil, but Edmund McIlhenny decided it would be a good place to grow peppers for use in his product, Tabasco sauce. The fun stories and historical connections make this book an informative and entertaining read. ( )
  Othemts | Apr 2, 2024 |
I definitely have mixed feelings about this one. The author has done an incredible amount of research and without a doubt makes his case for the importance of salt in world history, connecting it to lots of things we may have never thought of, and throwing in lots of interesting historical anecdotes. However, I could have done without the recipes. I did learn a lot however. The audiobook was generally well read except that the narrator doesn't know how to pronounce a lot of Chinese words, which I guess doesn't matter to most listeners who don't know how they are pronounced to begin with. ( )
  datrappert | Mar 20, 2024 |
ok, I probably found enough of it interesting for 200 pages, rather than the nearly 400 it is, but it was far more interesting then the topic would lead you to believe. ( )
  cspiwak | Mar 6, 2024 |
Enjoyed it, a lot of tying history together and the start of bigger things - taxation, money, trade etc.. Easy to drop and pick up easily. Lots of recipes. ( )
  SteveMcI | Jan 6, 2024 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 166 (siguiente | mostrar todos)
Who would have thought that musings on an edible rock could run to 450 breathless pages?

Let me hasten to add that Salt turns out to be far from boring. With infectious enthusiasm, Kurlansky leads the reader on a 5,000-year sodium chloride odyssey through China, India, Egypt, Japan, Morocco, Israel, Africa, Italy, Spain, Germany, Austria, England, Scandinavia, France and the US, highlighting the multifarious ways in which this unassuming chemical compound has profoundly influenced people's lives.
añadido por mysterymax | editarThe Guardian, Chris Lavers (Feb 15, 2002)
 

» Añade otros autores (6 posibles)

Nombre del autorRolTipo de autor¿Obra?Estado
Mark Kurlanskyautor principaltodas las edicionescalculado
Bekker, Jos denTraductorautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
Brick, ScottNarradorautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
del Rey, María JoséDiseñador de cubiertaautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
Klausner, LisaFotógrafoautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
Liefting, SteefDiseñador de cubiertaautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
Miró, CarlesTraductorautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
Rapho/GerstenArtista de Cubiertaautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
Ruggeri, F.Artista de Cubiertaautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado

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Información procedente del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
The real price of every thing, what every thing really costs to the man who wants to acquire it, is the toil and trouble of acquiring it.

—Adam Smith, The Wealth of Nations, 1776
All our invention and progress seem to result in endowing material forces with intellectual life, and in stultifying human life into a material force.

—Karl Marx, speech, 1856
Dreams are not so different from deeds as some may think. All the deeds of men are only dreams at first. And in the end, their deeds dissolve into dreams.

—Theodore Herzel, Old New Land, 1902
A country is never as poor as when it seems filled with riches.

—Laozi quoted in the
Yan tie lun,
A Discourse on Salt and Iron, 81 B.C.
At the time when Pope Pius VII had to leave Rome, which had been conquered by revolutionary French, the committee of the Chamber of Commerce in London was considering the herring fishery. One member of the committee observed that, since the Pope had been forced to leave Rome, Italy was probably going to become a Prtestant country. "Heaven help us," cried another member. "What," responded the first, "would you be upset to see the number of good Protestants increase?" "No," the other answered," it isn't that, but suppose there are no more Catholics, what shall we do with our herring?"

—Alexander Dumas, Le grand dictionnaire de cuisine, 1873
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To my parents, Roslyn Solomon and Philip Mendel Kurlansky, who taught me to love books and music

and

to Talia Feiga, who opened worlds while she slept in the crook of my arm.
Primeras palabras
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Introduction

I bought the rock in Spanish Catalonia, in the rundown hillside mining town of Cardonia.
Chapter One
A Mandate of Salt

Once I stood on the bank of a rice paddy in rural Sichuan Province, and a lean and aging Chinese peasant, wearing a faded forty-year-old blue jacked issued by the Mao government in the early years of the Revolution, stood knee deep in water and apropos of absolutely nothing shouted defiantly at me, "We Chinese invented many things!"
Citas
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(Haz clic para mostrar. Atención: puede contener spoilers.)
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Do not combine Salt: A History with The Story of Salt. The Story of Salt is a much shorter, illustrated version of Salt aimed at children.
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La sal ha influenciado en la configuración de nuestra civilización desde sus inicios.La obra sintetiza a través de la sal la historia de la humanidad.

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