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Primavera silenciosa (1962)

por Rachel Carson

Otros autores: Ver la sección otros autores.

MiembrosReseñasPopularidadValoración promediaMenciones
6,592991,466 (4.03)222
El exito obtenido por la Historia del tiempo, de Stephen Hawking, propicio la creacion, en 1991, de esta coleccion de divulgacion cientifica que fue dirigida durante largo tiempo por dos personas de formacion humanistica: de ahi ciertas contaminaciones al inicio de la coleccion. Sin embargo, cuando Jose Manuel Sanchez Ron se hizo cargo de ella, dio un aprobado a la gestion anterior. En esta coleccion, quiza la mas ambiciosa de todas las de divulgacion cientifica que se editan en espanol, se han publicado obras de Stephen Jay Gould, Carl Sagan, lan Stewart, Edward O. Wilson, Antonio Damasio, Luigi Luca Cavalli-Sforza, Ilya Prigogine, John D. Barrow, Rita Levi Montalcini, Richard P. Feynman, Roger Penrose, Steven Weinberg, Rachel Carson, Francisco Garcia Olmedo, Francisco Yndurain o Jose Manuel Sanchez Ron. Este libro, publicado en 1962, senala un momento decisivo en la historia de la toma de conciencia ante la degradacion del medio ambiente y en el nacimiento del movimiento ecologista, por su poderosa y conmovedora denuncia de los efectos nocivos que para la naturaleza tenia el empleo masivo de productos quimicos. Cuarenta anos despues de su aparicion, esta Biblia del ecologismo mantiene toda su vigencia.… (más)
  1. 20
    Our poisoned planet: can we save it? por Oliver Trager (Hedgepeth)
  2. 20
    Deep Green Resistance: Strategy to Save the Planet por Derrick Jensen (SonoranDreamer)
    SonoranDreamer: Deep Green Resistance is a book about a strategy for those who are frustrated with the ongoing poisoning of our planet even after all this time after Silent Spring was published.
  3. 10
    The Everglades: River of Grass por Marjory Stoneman Douglas (TheLittlePhrase)
  4. 11
    The War on Bugs por Will Allen (lemontwist)
  5. 00
    The Edge of the Sea por Rachel Carson (FoxSparrow)
  6. 01
    Sanctuary: The Story of Naturalist Mary Majka por Deborah Carr (ShelfMonkey)
  7. 01
    The Right to Be Cold: One Woman's Story of Protecting Her Culture, the Arctic and the Whole Planet por Sheila Watt-Cloutier (thebookpile)
    thebookpile: In Silent Spring, Rachel Carson says that to get away from contamination from DDT and other harmful chemicals one would have to move to the far north, which at that time wasn't exposed to them. Ironically, 60 years later, the situation is almost reversed, as described by Sheila Watt-Cloutier in The Right to Be Cold.… (más)
  8. 14
    Risk: The Science and Politics of Fear por Dan Gardner (Noisy)
    Noisy: Risk (Chapter 10) gives the counterpoint to Silent Spring, showing up the ignorance of probability and statistics embodied in the demonising of cancer. Rising relative rates of cancer - a disease of an aging population - also indicate a falling rate of diseases such as tuberculosis and enteritis.… (más)
  9. 14
    Breasts: A Natural and Unnatural History por Florence Williams (changsbooks)
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» Ver también 222 menciones

Inglés (94)  Catalán (2)  Danés (1)  Alemán (1)  Todos los idiomas (98)
Mostrando 1-5 de 98 (siguiente | mostrar todos)
The capacity for humans to not think through the ramifications of their choices on the environment and destroy it without meaning to do so inspired Rachel Carson's classic Silent Spring. In it, she traces the links between the rising use of pesticides and insecticides and the devastating consequences it has had for animal life in areas where application is wide-spread. Worse yet, it often doesn't accomplish the desired effect in the long term, which just encourages even heavier use. She doesn't flinch away from the fact that humans are animals, too, and highlights the issues that can arise for the people who live in the often-rural and therefore less-seen communities where these poisons are used most significantly. And since these people frequently eat locally-sourced meat and fish, the problem of biological magnification (animals eating food that has its own level of exposure, compounding with each step up the food chain) becomes even more pressing for them.

Carson writes all of this in strong, clear prose that first explains the concepts she's introducing and then illustrates them with examples of the devastating effects of poisons that are marketed as safe and effective on life, from plants all the way up to people. She doesn't condescend and though her urgency is clear, it doesn't feel alarmist or like a scare tactic. Instead, she presents her case that we need to start paying attention and questioning what we're told rigorously but understandably. Science writing often veers into the esoteric, and this book should be used an exemplar for how to write for the popular market without getting bogged down in details or sidetracked into areas more consequential for the author than the reader.

This book's continuing relevance even after it led to the the ban of DDT, the chemical she primarily discusses, is a result of both Carson's skill as a writer and the impact her work managed to have on the public. Not only did it take DDT off the market, it blazed the path that eventually led to the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency by President Nixon. Imaging a book being so popular and espousing its cause so effectively that it led to the creation of a new federal agency in today's world seems preposterous. All of that being said, this book wasn't an unqualified success for me. After a while, her constant use of examples of a chemical being introduced and the death of wildlife that followed started to feel repetitive, blunting its impact. And I found myself a bit skeptical of the rosiness with which she portrayed the alternative option of importing predators for invasive species control...to the best of my understanding, that can have harmful side effects of its own. All in all, though, this book is readable, relevant, and worth a perusal before you go nuts with the Round-Up on the dandelions. ( )
  ghneumann | Jun 14, 2024 |
Detailing how attempts eliminate various insect species with chemical spraying end up killing birds and mammals, including humans, instead. Carson's beautiful writing made the horror stories easier to read and increased my appreciation for nature. I read part of it in a forest, listening to a jackdaw colony overhead and letting six mosquitos gather on my arm before deciding it was time to get up.
  Silja_Camilla | May 11, 2024 |
it was interesting to read this both in an historical context, and to realize how much still needs to be done. but seeing where we were when this was written, and how brutal the effects were on the insects, birds, fish, etc, and how long it took them to do anything was honestly astounding (while also not being surprising at all). i can see why this was so necessary and world shifting/changing.
  overlycriticalelisa | Dec 1, 2023 |
This book should be required reading in all high schools before graduating, if just to keep generations from repeating the same mistakes. I'm sure students would get more out of this reality book over any other required fictional story any day. It is definitely a classic, written in 1962, the author brought together all deadly and lethal facets of broad-spectrum chemical sprays on this earth, in regards to all living creatures, great and small. She’s very plain spoken and easy to follow and understand.

Unfortunately, Rachel Carson, a marine biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, didn’t live long enough to see just how important her book was going to be to the world, and to see it jump-start a social revolution against broad-spectrum spray programs, and against all insecticides and herbicides being used so haphazardly throughout the world. She died in 1964, at age 56, of breast cancer, just 1-1/2 years after this book was published. The front cover states: “The Classic that Launched the Environmental Movement”. Silent Spring was definitely the catalyst that created the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in 1970, to which the Department of Agriculture would rightfully pass over their so-called job of “pesticide oversight”, and the Food Safety Inspection Service would also be transferred to be regulated by the EPA. Read this book SLOWLY! You might want to purchase this as an eBook to highlight and mark it up with notes. Unfortunately, mine was a library book.

Although, hopefully, most of these earlier highly toxic insecticides and herbicides have since been banned, every word written still applies today because we have only moved onto more "new and improved"…different chemicals, still spraying the crap out of everything, if it doesn’t eat us first, and still trusting the word of the federal government that all pesticides are “safe”, if applied in small doses.

You will be astounded with the liberties our government has taken with the use of hazardous chemicals over the years. The number of times they have used broad-spectrum spraying techniques to try and eradicate an infestation of just a single insect at times all across America, only to have it completely fail. The chemicals would end up only killing the enemies of the pest, and not the pest, themselves, opening the door for them to multiply beyond imagination, doubling and tripling the damage that was being done before. And not to mention the total disregard to the devastation to the wildlife and fish across America. This will really get your attention! She includes an extensive list of quality sources used, 54 pages worth, at the back of the book, organized by chapter (p. 301-355).

I’m not sure where we are at today, but even before the 1960’s, scientists were already beginning to find out about and test more biological controls, using parasites that are the enemies of the pests. They absolutely worked in most areas tested. Chemicals provide a temporary comfort, but, as we see and hear about even today, we lose out to even more resistant strains of weeds or other insects that are now free to move in and devour, when previously they were held in check by the balance of nature's system. ( )
  MissysBookshelf | Aug 27, 2023 |
One of the most important books of the 20c. Because I had a science background, friends would ask me if it was real, and of course I said yes. It only seemed overwrought at the time because we as a society had not yet realized all the damage we were doing to our home. ( )
  mykl-s | Aug 12, 2023 |
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» Añade otros autores (32 posibles)

Nombre del autorRolTipo de autor¿Obra?Estado
Carson, Rachelautor principaltodas las edicionesconfirmado
Darling, LoisIlustradorautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
Darling, LouisIlustradorautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
Facetti, GermanoDiseñador de cubiertaautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
Gore, AlIntroducciónautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
Hitchen, JonathanIlustradorautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
Huxley, JulianPrefaceautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
Lazar, WilliamNarradorautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
Lear, LindaIntroducciónautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
Markham, JohnCover photographautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
Matthiessen, PeterIntroducciónautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
Shackleton, EdwardIntroducciónautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
Wilson, Edward O.Epílogoautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
Debes iniciar sesión para editar los datos de Conocimiento Común.
Para más ayuda, consulta la página de ayuda de Conocimiento Común.
Título canónico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Fecha de publicación original
Personas/Personajes
Lugares importantes
Acontecimientos importantes
Películas relacionadas
Epígrafe
Información procedente del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
The sedge is wither'd from the lake,
and no bird sings. Keats.
I am pessimistic about the human race because it is too ingenious for its own good. Our approach to nature is to beat it into submission. We would stand a better chance of survival if we accommodated ourselves to this planet and viewed it appreciatively instead of sceptically and dictatorially. E B White.
Dedicatoria
Información procedente del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
To Albert Schweitzer who said "Man has lost the capacity to foresee and to forestall. He will end by destroying the earth.'
Primeras palabras
Información procedente del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
In a letter written in January 1958, Olga Owens Huckins told me of her own bitter experience of a small world made lifeless, and so brought my attention sharply back to a problem with which I had long been concerned. (Acknowledgments)
There was once a town in the heart of America where all life seemed to be in harmony with its surroundings. (1. A Fable for Tomorrow)
Citas
Últimas palabras
Información procedente del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
(Haz clic para mostrar. Atención: puede contener spoilers.)
Aviso de desambiguación
Editores de la editorial
Blurbistas
Idioma original
Información procedente del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
DDC/MDS Canónico
LCC canónico
El exito obtenido por la Historia del tiempo, de Stephen Hawking, propicio la creacion, en 1991, de esta coleccion de divulgacion cientifica que fue dirigida durante largo tiempo por dos personas de formacion humanistica: de ahi ciertas contaminaciones al inicio de la coleccion. Sin embargo, cuando Jose Manuel Sanchez Ron se hizo cargo de ella, dio un aprobado a la gestion anterior. En esta coleccion, quiza la mas ambiciosa de todas las de divulgacion cientifica que se editan en espanol, se han publicado obras de Stephen Jay Gould, Carl Sagan, lan Stewart, Edward O. Wilson, Antonio Damasio, Luigi Luca Cavalli-Sforza, Ilya Prigogine, John D. Barrow, Rita Levi Montalcini, Richard P. Feynman, Roger Penrose, Steven Weinberg, Rachel Carson, Francisco Garcia Olmedo, Francisco Yndurain o Jose Manuel Sanchez Ron. Este libro, publicado en 1962, senala un momento decisivo en la historia de la toma de conciencia ante la degradacion del medio ambiente y en el nacimiento del movimiento ecologista, por su poderosa y conmovedora denuncia de los efectos nocivos que para la naturaleza tenia el empleo masivo de productos quimicos. Cuarenta anos despues de su aparicion, esta Biblia del ecologismo mantiene toda su vigencia.

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