PortadaGruposDe qué se hablaMásZeitgeist
Buscar en el sitio
Este sitio utiliza cookies para ofrecer nuestros servicios, mejorar el rendimiento, análisis y (si no estás registrado) publicidad. Al usar LibraryThing reconoces que has leído y comprendido nuestros Términos de Servicio y Política de Privacidad. El uso del sitio y de los servicios está sujeto a estas políticas y términos.
Hide this

Resultados de Google Books

Pulse en una miniatura para ir a Google Books.

Cargando...

El Profeta (1923)

por Kahlil Gibran

Otros autores: Ver la sección otros autores.

Series: The Prophet (1)

MiembrosReseñasPopularidadValoración promediaMenciones
12,055146404 (4.11)129
La obra maestra de Kahlil Gibrán es uno de los más queridos clásicos de nuestra época, un repositorio rico en sabiduría y alegría que ha inspirado a generaciones de lectores. Con poesía frugal y bellamente resonante, El profeta ofrece inolvidables palabras de esperanza y consolación sobre los temas del nacimiento, del amor, del matrimonio, de la muerte y de los otros hitos de la vida. Desde su publicación hace más de setenta años, El profeta ha sido traducido a más de veinte idiomas y ha dado inspiración a millones de lectores, quienes encuentran en sus palabras la expresión de los más profundos impulsos, la más profunda poesía, del corazón humano.nbsp;nbsp;Ilustrados con los dibujos místicos de Gibrán--comparados por Auguste Rodin a los de William Blake--El profeta es un volumen para disfrutar y al cual volver a lo largo de la vida.… (más)
  1. 53
    Tao Te King por Lao Tzu (Othemts)
  2. 10
    Cuatro cuartetos por T. S. Eliot (kara.shamy)
  3. 10
    El jardín del profeta por Kahlil Gibran (Michael.Rimmer)
  4. 00
    A Flight of Swans: Poems from Balākā por Rabindranath Tagore (Michael.Rimmer)
  5. 00
    La Tabla Rasa por Steven Pinker (PlaidStallion)
    PlaidStallion: God, Jesus, Virgin Mary, Yahweh, Allah, Mohammed, Shiva, Buddha, Zeus, Odin, Horus, Emperor of Heaven, Haile Selassie, Great Spirit, Spider Grandmother, Flying Spaghetti Monster—take a lesson:


    MOST PEOPLE ARE familiar with the idea that some of our ordeals come from a mismatch between the source of our passions in evolutionary history and the goals we set for ourselves today. People gorge themselves in anticipation of a famine that never comes, engage in dangerous liaisons that conceive babies they don’t want, and rev up their bodies in response to stressors from which they cannot run away.

    What is true for the emotions may also be true for the intellect. Some of our perplexities may come from a mismatch between the purposes for which our cognitive faculties evolved and the purposes to which we put them today. This is obvious enough when it comes to raw data processing. People do not try to multiply six-digit numbers in their heads or remember the phone number of everyone they meet, because they know their minds were not designed for the job. But it is not as obvious when it comes to the way we conceptualize the world. Our minds keep us in touch with aspects of reality—such as objects, animals, and people—that our ancestors dealt with for millions of years. But as science and technology open up new and hidden worlds, our untutored intuitions may find themselves at sea.

    What are these intuitions? Many cognitive scientists believe that human reasoning is not accomplished by a single, general-purpose computer in the head. The world is a heterogeneous place, and we are equipped with different kinds of intuitions and logics, each appropriate to one department of reality. These ways of knowing have been called systems, modules, stances, faculties, mental organs, multiple intelligences, and reasoning engines. They emerge early in life, are present in every normal person, and appear to be computed in partly distinct sets of networks in the brain. They may be installed by different combinations of genes, or they may emerge when brain tissue self-organizes in response to different problems to be solved and different patterns in the sensory input. Most likely they develop by some combination of these forces.

    What makes our reasoning faculties different from the departments in a university is that they are not just broad areas of knowledge, analyzed with whatever tools work best. Each faculty is based on a core intuition that was suitable for analyzing the world in which we evolved. Though cognitive scientists have not agreed on a Gray’s Anatomy of the mind, here is a tentative but defensible list of cognitive faculties and the core intuitions on which they are based:
    • An intuitive physics, which we use to keep track of how objects fall, bounce, and bend. Its core intuition is the concept of the object, which occupies one place, exists for a continuous span of time, and follows laws of motion and force. These are not Newton’s laws but something closer to the medieval conception of impetus, an “oomph” that keeps an object in motion and gradually dissipates.
    • An intuitive version of biology or natural history, which we use to understand the living world. Its core intuition is that living things house a hidden essence that gives them their form and powers and drives their growth and bodily functions.
    • An intuitive engineering, which we use to make and understand tools and other artifacts. Its core intuition is that a tool is an object with a purpose—an object designed by a person to achieve a goal.
    • An intuitive psychology, which we use to understand other people. Its core intuition is that other people are not objects or machines but are animated by the invisible entity we call the mind or the soul. Minds contain beliefs and desires and are the immediate cause of behavior.
    • A spatial sense, which we use to navigate the world and keep track of where things are. It is based on a dead reckoner, which updates coordinates of the body's location as it moves and turns, and a network of mental maps. Each map is organized by a different reference frame: the eyes, the head, the body, or salient objects and places in the world.
    • A number sense, which we use to think about quantities and amounts. It is based on an ability to register exact quantities for small numbers of objects (one, two, and three) and to make rough relative estimates for larger numbers.
    • A sense of probability, which we use to reason about the likelihood of uncertain events. It is based on the ability to track the relative frequencies of events, that is, the proportion of events of some kind that turn out one way or the other.
    • An intuitive economics, which we use to exchange goods and favors. It is based on the concept of reciprocal exchange, in which one party confers a benefit on another and is entitled to an equivalent benefit in return.
    • A mental database and logic, which we use to represent ideas and to infer new ideas from old ones. It is based on assertions about what’s what, what’s where, or who did what to whom, when, where, and why. The assertions are linked in a mind-wide web and can be recombined with logical and causal operators such as AND, OR, NOT, ALL, SOME, NECESSARY, POSSIBLE, and CAUSE.
    • Language, which we use to share the ideas from our mental logic. It is based on a mental dictionary of memorized words and a mental grammar of combinatorial rules. The rules organize vowels and consonants into words, words into bigger words and phrases, and phrases into sentences, in such a way that the meaning of the combination can be computed from the meanings of the parts and the way they are arranged.
    The mind also has components for which it is hard to tell where cognition leaves off and emotion begins. These include a system for assessing danger, coupled with the emotion called fear, a system for assessing contamination, coupled with the emotion called disgust, and a moral sense, which is complex enough to deserve a chapter of its own.

    These ways of knowing and core intuitions are suitable for the lifestyle of small groups of illiterate, stateless people who live off the land, survive by their wits, and depend on what they can carry. Our ancestors left this lifestyle for a settled existence only a few millennia ago, too recently for evolution to have done much, if anything, to our brains. Conspicuous by their absence are faculties suited to the stunning new understanding of the world wrought by science and technology. For many domains of knowledge, the mind could not have evolved dedicated machinery, the brain and genome show no hints of specialization, and people show no spontaneous intuitive understanding either in the crib or afterward. They include modern physics, cosmology, genetics, evolution, neuroscience, embryology, economics, and mathematics.

    It’s not just that we have to go to school or read books to learn these subjects. It’s that we have no mental tools to grasp them intuitively. We depend on analogies that press an old mental faculty into service, or on jerry-built mental contraptions that wire together bits and pieces of other faculties. Understanding in these domains is likely to be uneven, shallow, and contaminated by primitive intuitions. And that can shape debates in the border disputes in which science and technology make contact with everyday life. The point … is that together with all the moral, empirical, and political factors that go into these debates, we should add the cognitive factors: the way our minds naturally frame issues. Our own cognitive makeup is a missing piece of many puzzles, including education, bioethics, food safety, economics, and human understanding itself.
    … (más)
  6. 12
    The Seed por Fola (nadoosha_373)
  7. 01
    Así habló Zarathustra por Friedrich Nietzsche (Sylak)
Cargando...

Inscríbete en LibraryThing para averiguar si este libro te gustará.

No hay Conversaciones actualmente sobre este libro.

» Ver también 129 menciones

Inglés (133)  Español (4)  Francés (3)  Holandés (2)  Catalán (2)  Pirata (1)  Todos los idiomas (145)
Mostrando 4 de 4
4ª reimp.
  miriminguea | Nov 27, 2020 |
Librería 1. Estante 6.
  atman2019 | Jul 10, 2019 |
EL PROFETA

PRÓLOGO

por Luz María T. de Hernández
GIBRAN Jalil Gibran es ese fenómeno filosófico-
literario que se produce sólo una vez en varios siglos
y en varias generaciones: el hombre que escribe de
temas profundos y eternos, fuera de la dimensión del
tiempo y el espacio.

Gibran es mucho, pero mucho más que poeta,
filósofo, escritor, artista, místico o humanista, a pesar
de que fue todas esas cosas. Gibran es la personificación
del ser humano en ese momento único, extraordinario,
en que es tocado por la chispa divina.

Quien lea "El Profeta" sin saber quién fu.e su
autor, difícilmente podrá adivinar en qué época o en
qué lugar pudo haber sido escrita. Esta obra, tal vez
la mejor y la más completa de la selecta producción
de Gibran, pudo haber sido escrita por un filósofo
chino hace 20 siglos, o por un libanés contemporáneo,
como lo fue realmente.

Gibran Jalil Gibran (1883-1931) vivió y murió
hace apenas unas cuantas décadas, en el Líbano. Está
reconocido internacionalmente como el genio indiscutible
no sólo de su país, sino de todo el Medio Oriente.
  FundacionRosacruz | Jul 6, 2018 |
EL PROFETA

En la poesía y el pensamiento de Gibrán
Jalil Gibrán se mezclan dos mundos, el
occidental y el oriental, en lo que
tienen de más sencillo y más místico.

El subjetivismo de sus ideas trata de
impulsar al hombre hacia la divinidad; su
rebelión se basa en la paz interior que el
hombre necesita para seguir siendo, para vivir
de forma auténtica. El mundo, con sus
obstáculos y sus miserias, no es para Gibrán
otra cosa que el camino hacia la purificación
personal. El ansia de fraternidad, de
generosidad, de acercamiento entre los
hombres es la vara mágica que hará habitable
nucstro mundo, cruel e insolidario, material y
desdeñoso de los valores auténticamente
humanos. Ésa es la idea que subyace en la
obra de un Gibrán que mezcló, en su
pensamiento, lo mejor de la cultura
occidental y de la oriental.
  FundacionRosacruz | Jul 6, 2018 |
Mostrando 4 de 4
sin reseñas | añadir una reseña

» Añade otros autores (83 posible)

Nombre del autorRolTipo de autor¿Trabajo?Estado
Gibran, Kahlilautor principaltodas las edicionesconfirmado
McFarlane, RobertFotógrafoautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
Valckenier, LiesbethTraductorautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
Verhulst, CarolusTraductorautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
Debes iniciar sesión para editar los datos de Conocimiento Común.
Para más ayuda, consulta la página de ayuda de Conocimiento Común.
Título canónico
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Fecha de publicación original
Personas/Personajes
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Lugares importantes
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Eventos importantes
Películas relacionadas
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Premios y honores
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Epígrafe
Dedicatoria
Primeras palabras
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Almustafa, the chosen and the beloved, who was a dawn unto his own day, had waited twelve years in the city of Orphalese for his ship that was to return and bear him back to the isle of his birth.
Citas
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
You have been told that, even like a chain, you are as weak as your weakest link.
This is but half the truth. You are also as strong as your strongest link.
To measure you by your smallest deed is to reckon the power of the ocean by the frailty of its foam.
And ever has it been that love knows not its own depth until the hour of desperation.
When love beckons to you, follow him, though his ways are hard and steep. And when his wings enfold you yield to him, though the sword hidden among his pinions may wound you. And when he speaks to you believe in him...
Your children are not your children. They are the sons and daughters of Life's longing for itself. They come through you but not from you, and though they are with you yet they belong not to you.
You give but little when you give of your possessions. It is when you give of yourself that you truly give.
Últimas palabras
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
(Click para mostrar. Atención: puede contener spoilers.)
Aviso de desambigüedad
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Library of Congress please note: this is NOT a work written in Arabic and translated into English. It is a work written in English by a Lebanese poet.
Editores
Blurbistas
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Idioma original
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
DDC/MDS Canónico
Canonical LCC

Referencias a esta obra en fuentes externas.

Wikipedia en inglés

Ninguno

La obra maestra de Kahlil Gibrán es uno de los más queridos clásicos de nuestra época, un repositorio rico en sabiduría y alegría que ha inspirado a generaciones de lectores. Con poesía frugal y bellamente resonante, El profeta ofrece inolvidables palabras de esperanza y consolación sobre los temas del nacimiento, del amor, del matrimonio, de la muerte y de los otros hitos de la vida. Desde su publicación hace más de setenta años, El profeta ha sido traducido a más de veinte idiomas y ha dado inspiración a millones de lectores, quienes encuentran en sus palabras la expresión de los más profundos impulsos, la más profunda poesía, del corazón humano.nbsp;nbsp;Ilustrados con los dibujos místicos de Gibrán--comparados por Auguste Rodin a los de William Blake--El profeta es un volumen para disfrutar y al cual volver a lo largo de la vida.

No se han encontrado descripciones de biblioteca.

Descripción del libro
Resumen Haiku

Cubiertas populares

Enlaces rápidos

Valoración

Promedio: (4.11)
0.5 3
1 29
1.5 9
2 113
2.5 20
3 281
3.5 49
4 589
4.5 56
5 865

¿Este eres tú?

Conviértete en un Autor de LibraryThing.

Penguin Australia

3 ediciones de este libro fueron publicadas por Penguin Australia.

Ediciones: 0140194479, 0141187018, 0141194677

Tantor Media

Una edición de este libro fue publicada por Tantor Media.

» Página de Información del Editor

 

Acerca de | Contactar | LibraryThing.com | Privacidad/Condiciones | Ayuda/Preguntas frecuentes | Blog | Tienda | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas de Figuras Notables | Primeros Reseñadores | Conocimiento Común | 163,249,676 libros! | Barra superior: Siempre visible