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Tormentas cotidianas (2009)

por William Boyd

MiembrosReseñasPopularidadValoración promediaMenciones
1,1757312,552 (3.51)114
Adam Kindred is in London for a job interview and looking at a bright future. Then he has a chance meeting in a restaurant that results in a series of actions that cost him his family, his money, his very identity. Utterly alone, Adam joins London's underground society of dispossessed and tries to figure out what happened to his life.… (más)
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Inglés (65)  Francés (4)  Holandés (2)  Alemán (2)  Todos los idiomas (73)
Mostrando 1-5 de 73 (siguiente | mostrar todos)
> Orages ordinaires, par William Boyd
Ce polar magnifiquement ficelé est aussi une méditation sur la fragilité de nos identités.
A Londres, Adam Kindred vient de découvrir un cadavre dans sa chambre d'hôtel. Craignant d'être accusé de ce meurtre par la police, il panique et décide de changer d'identité, avant de rejoindre les marginaux qui galèrent sur les rives de la Tamise. C'est l'histoire de cette rocambolesque métamorphose que raconte William Boyd, dont le héros, déguisé en SDF, va vivre une véritable descente aux enfers. Avec, à ses trousses, un affreux tueur à gages et une inspectrice qui le croit coupable. Un polar magnifiquement ficelé - mais aussi une méditation sur la fragilité de nos identités - où l'auteur de Brazzaville Plage explore les bas-fonds de Londres, cité fantomatique qu'il décrit en digne héritier de Dickens. --L'Express
  Joop-le-philosophe | Feb 10, 2021 |
This book took me out of my comfort zone. I liked this story, although the writing style did not appeal to me overly.

The story relies on the naivety of Adam Kindred not going to the police immediately about Philip Wang’s murder and then digging himself into bigger and bigger holes.

The timeline felt believable and the characters were well-drawn. I particularly liked Mhouse and got a sense of someone living hand-to-mouth, under the radar as best she could, providing for her son (although I worried she was going to kill him with the cocktail of drugs she was regularly feeding him), and being caught up with the likes of Mohammed & Mr Quality which was dragging her down. However, there is something good about Mhouse too. Her connection to the Church of John Christ where they feed the starving and accept everyone who walks through the door without question, suggests she has a caring side. It seemed odd that Mhouse would rob Adam Kindred and then direct him to her church, but perhaps that is the behaviour of someone desperate and under the wrong influences fighting her natural inclination to help.

I was surprised when Adam Kindred could so easily resort to murder to dispose of his blackmailer by throwing him off Chelsea Bridge, and letting the tide carry him to his death. Kindred was obviously backed so far into a corner that he had no other way out.

Kindred does this after disposing of his friend Vladimir’s body following a drug overdose. It felt as though Kindred was finding he was remorselessly able to things he would never even have contemplated previously. Before his death, Vladimir had assumed the identity of Primo Belem, which Adam then adopts, along with Vladimir's flat and new job as a porter. This job allows him to move around the hospital unnoticed, and uncover the motive for silencing Dr Wang.

The Church of John Christ is an odd one too. I wasn’t sure if it was a place where the vulnerable were indoctrinated, dressed up as a charity soup kitchen, or whether there was some financial scam going on in the background.

When Mhouse's son Ly-on was in the children’s home run by the Church of John Christ, the idea that anyone could take a child out for a day for a payment appalled me. While the organisation would know 'John 1603', they had no idea who he really was or his connection to Ly-on beyond being a friend of Ly-on’s mother.

I felt the ending left us guessing as to what might happen next as there are lots of threads not neatly tied off, which I rather enjoyed. ( )
  Deborah_J_Miles | Mar 25, 2020 |
Mord, London, Pharma, Obdachlos ( )
  sollimath | Mar 3, 2019 |
Climatologist Adam Kindred arrives in London from America for a job interview from after a sexual indiscretion has ruined his marriage and his academic career there. Dining alone in a Chelsea restaurant, he strikes up a conversation with fellow lone diner Philip Wang. When Wang, an immunologist, leaves the restaurant he also leaves a sheaf of papers behind. Adam, attempts to return the papers to his new acquaintance's flat only to find him with a knife sticking out of his side. Kindred subsequently does two incredibly stupid things: he removes the knife, hastening Wang's death and ensuring that his fingerprints are on the murder weapon, and then after hearing noises in the flat going on the run. Pursued by Wang's killer and the police he decides to shun the trappings of society and go underground living as a vagrant. Once there Kindred's intelligence and self-preservation instincts means that he is gradually able to construct some semblance of civilised life.

Thus the novel begins as a thriller with an innocent man mistaken for a murderer who finds himself caught up in the murky world of major pharmaceuticals and drug patenting. However, it soon becomes apparent that identity and self worth are also important factors in this book.

This idea seems to affect the author as much as the characters because I felt that Boyd struggled to decide what sort of book he actually wanted to write. Set along the banks of the Thames the action seems to meander along rather than rapidly flow downstream as you would expect in an out and out thriller. The twists and turns of the plot feel forced rather than free flowing.

The chapters generally alternate between Kindred and Jonjo Case, the real murderer, as they take part in in a cat and mouse chase but are on occasions interwoven with the stories of a few minor characters, ranging from a semi-literate prostitute struggling to survive as a single parent living on a London sink estate, a charlatan preacher who provides free meals to those willing to listen to his sermons, a policewoman (who also adds the love interest of this novel) who lives with her father on a house boat, and the fat cat owners of a large pharmaceutical company. These sub-plots rather suggest that the author wanted to write a critique on London life, the differences between the disparate social classes but this idea is hinted at rather than fully developed. This is a real shame because I believe that Boyd had a real opportunity to shine a light on the murky, lawless, subculture of a London sink estate and the alienation felt by those who feel on the outside of society not to mention their desire to survive no matter what obstacles life puts in front of them. Consequently Kindred's own character comes across as lacking any real depth.

This books therefore seems to fall between two very differing genres but that all said and done it is well written making this an enjoyable piece of escapism. I simply feel that it was a missed opportunity and could have been so much better. I have the author's A Good Man in Africa and Armadillo in my possession so look forward to reading them at some point. ( )
  PilgrimJess | Feb 11, 2019 |
There were some good moments, but this is not one of Boyd's best. This comment does not mean that I won't continue to read him. I will. ( )
1 vota JohnJGaynard | Dec 31, 2018 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 73 (siguiente | mostrar todos)
That's what I thought when I finished it. I thought, "It's not the way a thriller writer would do it." But I thought fair dos, he's trying to do something different. It's not something that I would necessarily criticise him for.
 
This is an uneven novel. Yet Boyd’s restless inventiveness sustained me throughout and the ending proved satisfying, not least because Boyd doesn’t resolve the plot fully. He lets some stories flow beyond the last page, like the Thames.
añadido por Shortride | editarBloomberg, James Pressley (Sep 25, 2009)
 
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Ordinary thunderstorms have the capacity to transform themselves into multi-cell storms of ever growing complexity. Such multi-cell storms display a marked increase in severity and their lifetime can be extended by a factor of ten or more. The grandfather of all thunderstorms, however, is the super-cell thunderstorm. It should be noted that even ordinary thunderstorms are capable of mutating into super-cell storms. These storms subside very slowly.
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Adam Kindred is in London for a job interview and looking at a bright future. Then he has a chance meeting in a restaurant that results in a series of actions that cost him his family, his money, his very identity. Utterly alone, Adam joins London's underground society of dispossessed and tries to figure out what happened to his life.

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