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Las máscaras de Dios. Tomo 4, Mitología creativa (1968)

por Joseph Campbell

Otros autores: Ver la sección otros autores.

Series: The Masks of God (Volume 4)

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1,48379,521 (4.03)4
This volume explores the whole inner story of modern culture since the Dark Ages, treating modern man's unique position as the creator of his own mythology.
Añadido recientemente poraemartin94, biblioteca privada, WestBranch, winnowing, ksoni1, Md.Sheik, ChrisHigginson, RichfieldUMC, ricksnadurti, Al_Ennis
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This was a great wrap-up to Joseph Campbell's The Masks of God 4-book series. The first 3 books in the series focus on how all of the mythologies in the world connect. This last book, though, focuses on how mythologies from different countries/areas are unique. For a series that focuses on the similarities of the world's mythologies, this last book initially seems a bit disjointed. However, I think that this was a good move on Campbell's part. It's specifically because the first three books focus on the similarities that it was beneficial to focus on the differences as well. As with the other three books, there were a few parts that seemed a bit slow and dragged on a bit too long. I did enjoy this book, though, and I do recommend the series. (Although it's not necessary to read every book in this series to read one.) ( )
  historybookreads | Jul 26, 2021 |
OKAY. For as much as I generally love Campbell for his scholarship and his breadth and depth of knowledge on all things religious, mythical, and anthropological, I have to say he goes rather overboard in a DIFFERENT direction for this book.

What direction, you ask?

Living culture. And I'm not really talking about modern culture so much as I'm referring to the scope of the Dark Ages through Thomas Mann and James Joyce. He does the literary analysis thing. In spades. Want Beowulf? Check. Want tons of Parcival, Gawain, and even the tragic love story of Adelard and Heloise? Check. Want the erudite traditions, influences, mythological connections and cultural transformations laid out? You got it.

But wait, that's not all! We get some of the best and fully explained nastiness of the truth behind chastity in Christianity and the best visceral descriptions I've ever read that makes me UNDERSTAND why the whole Romantic Love thing took off so HARD back at the opening days of the Rennaisance. Grail Legend? Chivalry? The whole love thing was bucking the Church and Society HARD. Trubadors were the punk bands of the day. :)

We get the influence of Alchemy and Science in poetry, music, and opera. We get dozens of traditions, a great analysis that shows just how much Islamic thought is slathered throughout the Divine Comedy, and so much more.

So what's my problem?

It feels like half the book was devoted to fanboying over Thomas Mann and James Joyce.

I mean, sure, these guys were like a wet dream for mythographers and sociologists and Jungian analysts and they wrote some fine fiction, too, but I would have been JUST FINE with... a slightly abbreviated analysis.

Don't get me wrong! I'm now interested as hell in reading more of Thomas Mann and I may go ahead and revisit Joyce soon, but BY NO MEANS is this very good reading if you're not at least slightly interested in either author.

Of course, if you're prepping yourself in College for writing one hell of a great essay on Joyce (or 14 of them), then DO YOURSELF A BIG FAVOR and read this book or the relevant sections. Some of it rather blew me away. :)


Is this the best stuff Campbell ever wrote? Hell, no. It's very learned and I learned TONS, but it was almost nothing like what I had come to expect from him. More like he had been sitting around doing a lot of reading and his brilliant mind came up with fantastic random crap that sooner or later coalesced into a huge coherent literary epiphany. I think that's great and all but damn... I wanted the world, not fiction, THIS TIME. :) ( )
  bradleyhorner | Jun 1, 2020 |
Gerald Sykes said of this work, "[Joseph Campbell] says things here that have not been said anywhere else--though every good artist has implied them--and he says them with urgency, breadth, and some of the most impressive scholarship of our time."
Esta reseña ha sido marcada por varios usuarios como un abuso de los términos de servicio y nunca más se mostrará (mostrar).
  uufnn | Jan 28, 2017 |
After exploring ancient, Eastern, and Western mythology and religion up until the approximate time of the Dark Ages, Joseph Campbell's final volume of his Masks of God series deals with the "modern" world. As societies became increasingly mobile and fluid, the social purpose of religion and myth (transmission of local cultural "rules" to each generation, and the acceptance of those rules) fades in importance. Now what?

Creative Mythology explores what happens as cultures begin to intermingle, how local symbols are repurposed for new reasons in new places. He uses the lens of epic poetry to show us the heretic Christian ideas of Tristan & Isolde, the heavily pagan roots of Beowulf, and the Islamic influence on Dante's Divine Comedy (which was super interesting to me, since I took a class on just this work in college, and to the best of my recollection, this never came up). He moves into the modern world by dissecting some of the works of Thomas Mann and James Joyce (Finnegan's Wake, Ulysses, and Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man). Portrait was something I read several years ago that I enjoyed not at all and remembered precious little of, and after reading about it here, I'm not sure I want to read Ulysses even though it's a "classic" because it sounds very tiresome. Campbell wraps up his review by discussing the Holy Grail mythologies in the Knights of the Round Table/Arthurian legends (this section is very very long), and then concludes by reflecting back on the functions of mythologies, and how they have and do work (or not, as the case may be).

I'm not going to lie...I'm very glad to be done with this series. It was very informative, but only sporadically interesting. Do I feel much better versed in world religion and mythology? Yes. Would my life have been just as lovely without it? Absolutely. ( )
  ghneumann | Apr 7, 2016 |
Deel IV uit de beroemde serie The Masks of God. Over nieuwe mythologieën in de literatuur en kunst van de moderne wereld. Heel interessant!
  Heldinne | Sep 7, 2013 |
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» Añade otros autores

Nombre del autorRolTipo de autor¿Trabajo?Estado
Campbell, Josephautor principaltodas las edicionesconfirmado
Chagal, MarcArtista de la Cubiertaautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
Stuart, NealDiseñador de cubiertaautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado

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The Masks of God (Volume 4)

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In the earlier volumes of this survey of the historical transformations of those imagined forms that I am calling the "masks" of God, through which men everywhere have sought to relate themselves to the wonder of existence, the myths and rites of the Primitive, Oriental, and Early Occidental worlds could be discussed in terms of grandiose unitary stages.
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This volume explores the whole inner story of modern culture since the Dark Ages, treating modern man's unique position as the creator of his own mythology.

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