PortadaGruposSe habla deMásVisión actual
Buscar En Este Sitio
Este sitio utiliza cookies para ofrecer nuestros servicios, mejorar el rendimiento, para análisis y (si no está registrado) para publicidad. Al usar LibraryThing reconoces que has leído y comprendido nuestros Términos de Servicio y Política de Privacidad. Su uso del sitio y de los servicios está sujeto a estas políticas y términos.
Hide this

Resultados de Google Books

Pulse en una miniatura para ir a Google Books.

The Hopkins Manuscript por R. C. Sherriff
Cargando...

The Hopkins Manuscript (original 1939; edición 1963)

por R. C. Sherriff (Autor), Joseph Mugnaini (Ilustrador), George Gamow (Epilogue), John Gassner (Introducción)

MiembrosReseñasPopularidadValoración promediaMenciones
1757119,177 (4.41)34
The funny and moving story of the apocalypse - as seen from one small village in England 'I loved this book, by turns funny and tragic ... It moves between abject despair and good old-fashioned British stoicism with ease. Magical' Jeff Noon, Spectator, Books of the Year 2018 Retired teacher Edgar Hopkins lives for the thrill of winning poultry prizes. But his narrow world is shattered when he learns that the moon is about to come crashing into the earth, with apocalyptic consequences. The manuscript he leaves behind will be a testament - to his growing humanity and to how one English village tried to survive the end of the world... Written in 1939 as the world was teetering on the brink of global war, R. C. Sherriff's tragicomic novel is a masterly work of science fiction, and a powerful warning from the past. 'Spectacular, skilled and moving. It is supremely and alarmingly relevant' Fay Weldon 'Intensely readable and touching' Sunday Telegraph… (más)
Miembro:BookHavenAZ
Título:The Hopkins Manuscript
Autores:R. C. Sherriff (Autor)
Otros autores:Joseph Mugnaini (Ilustrador), George Gamow (Epilogue), John Gassner (Introducción)
Info:Macmillan Company (1963), Edition: 1st, 274 pages
Colecciones:Tu biblioteca
Valoración:
Etiquetas:SF HC, BCE

Detalles de la obra

The Hopkins Manuscript por R. C. Sherriff (1939)

  1. 10
    La guerra de las salamandras por Karel Čapek (chrisharpe)
    chrisharpe: A similar kind of dystopian novel written on the verge of WWII, both are fantasies, reminiscent of H.G. Wells, with a puzzling (to me at least) element of satire on contemporary events. Definitely of their time - black-and-white Sunday afternoon early sci-fi.… (más)
  2. 00
    La guerra de los mundos por H. G. Wells (chrisharpe)
Ninguno
Cargando...

Inscríbete en LibraryThing para averiguar si este libro te gustará.

No hay Conversaciones actualmente sobre este libro.

» Ver también 34 menciones

Mostrando 1-5 de 7 (siguiente | mostrar todos)
The expedition from the Royal Society of Abyssinia was tremendously excited to discover what becomes known as the 'Hopkins Manuscript' hidden in a vacuum flask behind bricks in the ruins of what had once been London. After all, very little written text had survived from the island of Great Britain apart from an inscription on an iron tablet 'deciphered by Dr Shangul of Aduwa University as 'KEEP OFF THE GRASS'', and a rectangular column of stone inscribed 'PECKHAM 3 MILES'. London, and indeed the British Isles as a whole, clearly did not come to a happy end:

For nearly a thousand years, since its last wretched inhabitants starved to death amidst the ruins of their once noble cities, the Island remained a deserted ghost-haunted waste - its towns and villages buried ever deeper beneath encroaching forest and swamp

The scholars excitement is reduced when they realise that Edgar Hopkins, the author of the aforesaid Manuscript, was a man of 'unquenchable self-esteem and limited vision', obsessed with the breeding of prize-winning poultry, but still the Manuscript is the only eye witness document that exists to the feelings of an Englishman in the days of the 'Cataclysm'.

And what had caused the Cataclysm soon becomes clear as Edgar Hopkins begins his narrative. As a member of the British Lunar Society Mr Hopkins is one of the first people to hear the alarming news that the distance between the Earth and the Moon is rapidly reducing, and that the Moon is expected to strike the Earth in a few months time, rather precisely calculated to be the 3rd May 1946, at about 8 o'clock. (The book was published in 1939, before the outbreak of WWII). Once this becomes known to the general public, the panic is rather less than might be expected. Some people don't believe the scientists, many people have a rather hazy idea of the moon's size, and others are too involved in their day to day lives to read the papers. But the Moon gets bigger and bigger in the night sky and the fateful day approaches...

This isn't a book to read expecting a scientific explanation of why the moon's orbit changes, or of what eventually happens on the 3rd May. The reader just has to go with the flow on that. Rather, it's a novel about human nature in the event of unspeakable circumstances. Written in the 1930's, it's also a commentary on the populist and fascist political leaders of its time, and rather more worryingly seems to be quite appropriate for today's political climate as well.

A science-fiction novel written by a male author isn't the normal Persephone Books offering, but it's an interesting bridge between H.G.Wells and John Wyndham in the world of British science-fiction. Just don't be expecting too much of a cozy catastrophe - this is rather darker. ( )
  SandDune | Jan 14, 2020 |
There are plenty of dove grey covered books which are synonymous with the kind of output we have come to expect from the divine Persephone books, works by the likes of Dorothy Whipple, D E Stevenson, Mollie Panter Downes and Marghanita Laski. The Hopkins Manuscript is not that kind of book – on paper it isn’t the kind of novel I would read, but prompted by Kaggsy’s superb review I put it on my Persephone wishlist. Although I received it for Christmas in 2013 it has taken me till now to get around to reading it – and it proved absolutely unputdownable. A Sci-Fi novel by the author of the famous World War I play Journey’s End and another superb novel re-issued by Persephone books A Fortnight in September, The Hopkins Manuscript is a brilliant imagining of the moon’s collision with the earth, and the eventual end of western civilisation. Sci-fi novels vary in type, and I have read only a few over the years, but the only kind of Sci-fi I have any interest in, is the type which is set in a recognisable world, where unexpected, unworldly or fantastic events impact seriously upon that world and the people in it.

The novel opens with a foreword in which an Abyssinian scientist explains how the Hopkins Manuscript was discovered inside a flask by explorers examining the ruins of Notting Hill; working to understand the last days of that dead western civilisation. The document was written in the days before the death of that civilisation, and hidden away for men of the future to discover.

The Manuscript begins seven years after the cataclysm; the world of Western Europe is dying.

“I am writing by the light of a piece of string which I have pushed through a fragment of bacon fat and arranged in an egg-cup. I shall write by night, partly because I can no longer sleep through these ghastly, moonless chasms, and partly because by day I must search for food, and the days are short.”

the hopkins manuscriptThe narrator, Edgar Hopkins a quiet former school master, member of the British Lunar Society, was living in a small house in the Hampshire village of Beadle in October 1945. His concerns were mainly those of a keen breeder of Bantam hens. Edgar’s quiet, comfortable life is thrown horribly off balance when he is called to an emergency meeting of The Lunar Society in London. Edgar travels to London with his heart in his mouth, expecting to be stung for money he can ill afford and rashly promised during an acrimonious earlier meeting. However, Edgar and his fellow members are instead let into a terrible secret, a secret that governments and scientists have known and been preparing for quietly behind the scenes.

“At midnight on the 12th February this year the moon had drawn nearer to the earth by 3,583 miles”

The president of the society lays the facts before his stunned audience, how the measurements have been taken and scrupulously checked, and that according to their calculations the moon will crash into the earth on May 3rd of the following year. There begins much speculation about the nature and severity of the collision and whether it will mean a complete destruction of the earth, or whether the earth will survive altered and in parts devastated but with some life at least preserved. The members of the society are urged to keep the secret until the altered appearance of the moon becomes so discernible with the naked eye that the people need be told. Edgar goes home to his dear little home, his hens and the community with whom he has a reserved relationship nursing his terrible secret.

Bit by bit the world’s fate becomes known, and things necessarily start to change. Sherrif’s descriptions of how the government and media manipulate the populace into calm compliance feels brilliantly realistic; one way to keep the populace busy and active, and giving people hope is in the required development of dug outs in which to spend the hours of the evening of the 3rd May. In the months leading up to the fateful night – Edgar finds new occupations and develops new friendships among the people of Beadle. Aside from a few understandable ructions, the villagers largely pull together, many of them believing in the government’s positive spin on the impending disaster. We know of course right from the start that the earth isn’t instantly destroyed – but that is partly what makes this so compulsively readable, how is the world changed? Who dies? who survives?

Edgar Hopkins is a rather self-important little man (although still likeable enough – he is a recognisable type) he takes great pride in his prize hen Broodie, and has placed himself rather above the patrons of the local pub in the years before that meeting at the British Lunar society which condemned him to the possibility of just seven months left on earth. In the three months before the news of the moon’s collision with earth is made known, Edgar nurses the secret jealously and importantly, imagining how his fore-knowledge will in time make him a hero among the villagers as he calms their fears and intelligently answers the questions that must naturally follow. Things, naturally don’t go quite as Edgar has imagines – but Edgar has skills, and when he begins to throw himself into the creation of the Beadle dugout he finds he has more in common with people from the village than he perhaps thought.

“All the way to the village the birds sang in chorus as birds only can upon a dawn in May. I think the singing of those birds in the moonlight was the strangest sound that I ever heard”

What happens after the 3rd of May is brilliantly imagined, Edgar Hopkins finds himself in a world he doesn’t recognise. Yet, Edgar has been changed and rather humanised by the months leading up to the cataclysm, and so he throws himself into working to re-establish is own little piece of the world amidst the changed and devastated landscape. The irony of course, and no doubt the message of the entire novel, is that it isn’t the devastating natural disaster that destroys the world, but man himself.

This novel is brilliant on so many levels, it is a sci-fi novel which should really be every bit as well known as The Time Machine, yet I am sure few people (non Persephone readers certainly) have heard of it. The Hopkins Manuscript examines, quite poignantly how human beings react under extraordinary circumstances, but it also has a lot to say about the ending of the Empire as it was understood at this time, the relationships between nations and how ultimately man is destined to destroy itself. There is naturally a clear allegorical aspect to a novel written and published at a time of dreadful upheaval in Europe, as the threat of war drew ever closer. Outside of all that however, The Hopkins Manuscript is just a hugely readable story, endlessly compelling I fairly flew through what is a pretty chunky volume. ( )
1 vota Heaven-Ali | Jul 30, 2015 |
'At midnight on the 12th February this year the moon had drawn nearer to the earth by 3583 miles, July 7, 2014

This review is from: The Hopkins Manuscript (Paperback)
I don't normally read sci-fi, but was tempted by this being a Persephone publication - and I really enjoyed it.
Set in the 1930s, it's narrated by Edgar Hopkins, a pompous little ex-schoolmaster, whose life revolves around his poultry and membership of the Lunar Society. When he and a few select others are made privy to the fact that the moon is approaching the earth, and will collide in 7 months, life is set to change forever...
The first half of the novel was to my mind the most interesting, covering the lead-up to the Event. When the government finally announce it to the population at large, there's a general sense of cameraderie and team-spirit, as people undertake the building of a dug-out - yet there's an underlying feeling that it won't be too dreadful, as shown in the debate on rules for the dug-out:
"A lady asked whether knitting or needlework would be allowed, and the Committee, after a brief discussion, agreed to the loose, handy type but forbade tapestry frames, etc"
What happens after the collision, and how the Earth rallies, forms the second half of the novel...
Very much influenced by world events at the time of publication (1939), this is extremely readable, entertaining, and quite scary at times:
'I thought of it no longer as the moon; it hung like a great amber pock-marked lamp above a billiard-table, so vast and enveloping that the little white-clad cricketers moved without shadows.' ( )
  starbox | Jul 7, 2014 |
On the first page of this novel, written in 1939, R. C. Sherriff states that western civilization no longer exists. A young scientist from the Royal Society of Abyssinia discovers the Hopkins manuscript in a thermos bottle hidden in recess of a decayed wall. Prior to the discovery of the manuscript, the only written artifacts from The Island are a rectangular column of stone inscribed with "PERCHAM 3 MILES ( now in the Imperial Museum of Afghanistan) and a rusted iron tablet with " KEEP OFF THE GRASS" (Royal Collection of Addis Ababa). So begins the saga of what caused the total destruction of the west.

The author of the manuscript and hero is the unlikely Edgar Hopkins, a fifty-three year old retired math teacher whose chief interests in life are raising prize poultry and the moon. As a chicken breeder, his high point was the invention of a heated perch to keep the feet of his birds nice and warm. He felt he was not appreciated for this advance in creature comfort. As a moon fancier he belongs to the prestigious British Lunar Society. It is at the Sept 18, 1945 meeting of the society that he is made privy to the awful truth: the moon is hurtling toward the earth and will crash into it in seven months! How Edgar Hopkins and his village cope with the catastrophe is the story of the manuscript, much to the disappointment of the eastern scholars who were hoping for an in-depth study of western ideas and philosophies.

At first, Edgar is a caricature, a silly man who is so self-absorbed that he actually gives the vicar a subscription to a poultry-breeding magazine so they have something to talk about at the bridge table. After the shock wears off, he is full of a secret pride that he knows something the ignorant villagers are unaware of and he imagines he will become the "moon" expert of Beadle Hampshire. He is miffed when, at the eventual revelation to the country, the villagers seem unaffected by the news. Since the information was announced during church services many thought it was not nearly as good a sermon as the old vicar who could really talk about hell-fire. A moon collision was really not as menacing as all that brimstone.

Gradually, as the moon moves obviously closer to the earth, attitudes and people change, including Edgar Hopkins. For the first time he becomes involved in village life and finds himself accepted at the pub. He makes friends and uses his organizing skills to help to prepare for the crash. He becomes particularly close to two young neighbors until they are almost a family.

The crisis brings out the best in the village and, one supposes, the rest of the western world. But the manuscript ends seven years after the moon's impact. So what caused western civilization to disappear? Sadly, it is an easy mystery to solve.

As the world was ready to begin a second war in 1939, Sherriff wrote this social satire. Parts of it are funny, especially Edgar at his most pompous. Parts are very exciting and the tension as the moon draws closer is really well done. The evolution of Edgar from a prissy jerk to a heroic survivor is touching. But, in the end, The Hopkins Manuscript is a warning that, although humanity can survive any number of natural disasters, civilization can only be destroyed by man himself.

A marvelous read. ( )
2 vota Liz1564 | Apr 21, 2011 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 7 (siguiente | mostrar todos)
sin reseñas | añadir una reseña

» Añade otros autores (4 posible)

Nombre del autorRolTipo de autor¿Trabajo?Estado
Sherriff, R. C.autor principaltodas las edicionesconfirmado
Gamow, GeorgeIntroducciónautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
Gassner, JohnIntroducciónautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
Moorcock, MichaelPrefacioautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado

Belongs to Publisher Series

Debes iniciar sesión para editar los datos de Conocimiento Común.
Para más ayuda, consulta la página de ayuda de Conocimiento Común.
Título canónico
Información del Conocimiento común finlandés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Fecha de publicación original
Personas/Personajes
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Lugares importantes
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Eventos importantes
Películas relacionadas
Premios y honores
Epígrafe
Dedicatoria
Primeras palabras
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
I am writing by the light of a piece of string which I have pushed through a fragment of bacon fat and arranged in an egg-cup.
Citas
Últimas palabras
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
(Click para mostrar. Atención: puede contener spoilers.)
Aviso de desambigüedad
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
First published 1939 as 'The Hopkins Manuscript'
Editores
Blurbistas
Idioma original
DDC/MDS Canónico

Referencias a esta obra en fuentes externas.

Wikipedia en inglés

Ninguno

The funny and moving story of the apocalypse - as seen from one small village in England 'I loved this book, by turns funny and tragic ... It moves between abject despair and good old-fashioned British stoicism with ease. Magical' Jeff Noon, Spectator, Books of the Year 2018 Retired teacher Edgar Hopkins lives for the thrill of winning poultry prizes. But his narrow world is shattered when he learns that the moon is about to come crashing into the earth, with apocalyptic consequences. The manuscript he leaves behind will be a testament - to his growing humanity and to how one English village tried to survive the end of the world... Written in 1939 as the world was teetering on the brink of global war, R. C. Sherriff's tragicomic novel is a masterly work of science fiction, and a powerful warning from the past. 'Spectacular, skilled and moving. It is supremely and alarmingly relevant' Fay Weldon 'Intensely readable and touching' Sunday Telegraph

No se han encontrado descripciones de biblioteca.

Descripción del libro
Resumen Haiku

Enlaces rápidos

Cubiertas populares

Valoración

Promedio: (4.41)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 1
3.5 3
4 8
4.5 4
5 12

¿Este eres tú?

Conviértete en un Autor de LibraryThing.

 

Acerca de | Contactar | LibraryThing.com | Privacidad/Condiciones | Ayuda/Preguntas frecuentes | Blog | Tienda | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas de Figuras Notables | Primeros Reseñadores | Conocimiento Común | 157,946,077 libros! | Barra superior: Siempre visible