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John Donne's Poetry (Norton Critical…
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John Donne's Poetry (Norton Critical Editions) (edición 1991)

por John Donne (Autor), A. L. Clements (Editor)

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The texts reprinted in this new Norton Critical Edition have been scrupulously edited and are from the Westmoreland manuscript where possible, collated against the most important families of Donne manuscripts--the Cambridge Belam, the Dublin Trinity, and the O'Flahertie--and compared with all seven seventeenth-century printed editions of the poems as well as all major twentieth-century editions."Criticism" is divided into four sections and represents the best criticism and interpretation of Donne's writing: "Donne and Metaphysical Poetry" includes seven seventeenth-century views by contemporaries of Donne such as Ben Jonson, Thomas Carew, and John Dryden, among others; "Satires, Elegies, and Verse Letters" includes seven selections that offer social and literary context for and insights into Donne's frequently overlooked early poems; "Songs and Sonnets" features six analyses of Donne's love poetry; and "Holy Sonnets/Divine Poems" explores Donne's struggles as a Christian through four authoritative essays.A Chronology of Donne's life and work, a Selected Bibliography, and an Index of Titles and First Lines are also included.… (más)
Miembro:albanyhill
Título:John Donne's Poetry (Norton Critical Editions)
Autores:John Donne (Autor)
Otros autores:A. L. Clements (Editor)
Info:W. W. Norton (1991), Edition: 2, 400 pages
Colecciones:Tu biblioteca
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Etiquetas:E8-3

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John Donne's Poetry [Norton Critical Edition] por John Donne

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I’ve always enjoyed Donne so this read did not disappoint ( )
  Vividrogers | Dec 20, 2020 |
I read eleven poems, plus the 16 sonnet sequence "Holy Sonnets" for my bookclub.

I thought "To His Mistress" was quite sensual. Could you imagine having all of that stuff to take off—girdle, breastplate, busk (corset), gown, coronet, shoes. He says “unpin” and “Unlace yourself.” I’m so glad I don’t have to go through all that to get undressed each night.

In "Valediction: Forbidding Mourning" I really liked the analogy of the compass for a married couple. John Donne wrote this to his wife as he was leaving for Europe. They were like a compass—she was the fixed foot. Since they were one flesh, while he was away, their soul would expand. Like a compass she would remain in place but lean towards him while he was away. Then she would straighten as he returned.

I found the Holy Sonnets quite interesting. What a difference from his earlier works, eh? Of course, Death Be Not Proud is a triumphant poem. I've always loved it. Death should not be proud because some day it's going to die. I've always had that comfort that at the moment of death the victory is won. Sometimes we have the idea that when someone loses their battle with cancer or other illness, they've lost. But at just the moment they've lost the battle, they've won the war through faith in Christ.

The poem called "Spit in my face you Jews" is interesting.

My sins, which pass the Jews' impiety:
They killed once an inglorious man, but I
Crucify him daily, being now glorified.

At first I was wondering where he was going with this--it started out sounding like he was going to bash the Jews, but ended up with him convicting himself. Good one. ( )
  heidip | Dec 28, 2014 |
John Donne’s poetry is very complex, but identifies with anyone who is stuck between two very different identities; for him that was English and Catholic. Many of his poems have light at the end of the tunnel, while some end in death.
  Backus2 | Sep 24, 2013 |
A great collection of this very interesting poet: "More than kisses, letters mingle souls." ( )
  Peter_Forster | Sep 15, 2011 |
What is it that infects the iconoclasts? What is it unrelenting that they cannot be the same?

John Donne was a man who straddled the channel. To be English and Catholic was to never have an identity. Sometimes it troubled him, but to be no one man became his greatest gift. There are those who are never forced to look beyond their place and their lives. That place itself may be challanged, and success is never assured, but to strive to become someone out of being so strongly no-one is another type of success.

It taught him joy in the world. It taught him of the simplicity of joy: that it is always a small thing and turns about and about on a single word. It stretched him out along a continuum with two opposing sides that could never be opposite concepts, and only found their conflict in the blood and flesh of men.

I might say it is no wonder that he was the man who tried to imagine a speck of dust that spans the universe. I might say it, but it would not be true: Donne is a wonder; and he is a wonderer. In that sense, he creates himself. He may be this, or he may be its opposite. That he was born a Catholic and died the Anglican Priest of St. Paul's Cathedral is not the showing of a change of identity, but rather a simple turn of phrase.

Why shouldn't a poet's life be a poem? We might ask what mark could stand betwixt the caesura of a man's change of heart. The mark is Metaphysics, which has doggedly followed him ever since.

There is a Shakespearean accessibility to Donne, in that he never places himself squarely behind any particular idea. Indeed, he is defined by his ability to question more than answer. He also bears some resemblance to the bard in his use of low humor, which combines with his holy works to span most of human experience.

However, there is often little accessible about his conceits, which are complex, intellectual, and many-layered. Unlike Shakespeare, Donne tends to challenge the reader (though the argument of medium may stand here). Like Pope, there is the sense that Donne is sharing a joke with you, and there is satisfaction in it. However, it is often less likely to be (entirely) a joke as a conceptual and philosophical exploration.

Taking his cues from the consummate Petrarch, Donne builds a language and a world of poetry like the crafting of a philosophy. However, finding himself too uninhibited to match the singular drive and form of Petrarch, Donne leaves us instead an open book, where every confirmation undermines itself, and to withhold becomes, itself, a passion. ( )
  Terpsichoreus | Jun 9, 2009 |
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The texts reprinted in this new Norton Critical Edition have been scrupulously edited and are from the Westmoreland manuscript where possible, collated against the most important families of Donne manuscripts--the Cambridge Belam, the Dublin Trinity, and the O'Flahertie--and compared with all seven seventeenth-century printed editions of the poems as well as all major twentieth-century editions."Criticism" is divided into four sections and represents the best criticism and interpretation of Donne's writing: "Donne and Metaphysical Poetry" includes seven seventeenth-century views by contemporaries of Donne such as Ben Jonson, Thomas Carew, and John Dryden, among others; "Satires, Elegies, and Verse Letters" includes seven selections that offer social and literary context for and insights into Donne's frequently overlooked early poems; "Songs and Sonnets" features six analyses of Donne's love poetry; and "Holy Sonnets/Divine Poems" explores Donne's struggles as a Christian through four authoritative essays.A Chronology of Donne's life and work, a Selected Bibliography, and an Index of Titles and First Lines are also included.

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