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The Mind of the Maker (1941)

por Dorothy L. Sayers

Otros autores: Ver la sección otros autores.

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1,1931314,113 (4.14)23
Dorothy L Sayers' great lay contemporaries in the Church of England were T. S. Eliot, C.S. Lewis and Charles Williams, but none of them wrote a book quite like The Mind of the Maker. In this crisp, elegant exercise in theology, Sayers illuminates the doctrine of the Trinity by relating it to the process of writing fiction, a process about which she could speak with complete authority. She illustrates her thesis with many examples drawn from her own books, and even illuminates the Christian heresies by analysing certain failures of creation which regularly occur in literature. This marvellous classic describes the creative process in terms of the arts and shows that literature can cast light on theology and vice versa.… (más)
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» Ver también 23 menciones

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I found this book accidentally while exploring info about the Inklings. Sayers was introduced to me via Connie Willis's To Say Nothing of the Dog and, though I've only read one of her books, what I know about her stuck because she was a very unconventional woman for her time. But she was, it seems, also the daughter of a religious leader. So I thought that her thoughts about the creative process and religion might be interesting. And they were.

To be sure, some of it is a stretch, for me personally. But there is a lot of depth packed into this book. She is every bit the equal of C. S. Lewis with, perhaps, a more specific audience. ( )
  OutOfTheBestBooks | Sep 24, 2021 |
*Sayers, The Mind of the Maker (audio; Jul 10-27)
  benjdevries | Apr 25, 2021 |
I've wanted to read this book for years, and it is everything I'd hoped it would be. Very like C.S. Lewis, which is high praise indeed. It's a synthesis of literary theory and theology, which means that it could have been written only for me. The first quarter, where she's setting up her thesis, made me think I'd dropped a few IQ points - it is very dense - but it is a very happy ride from then on. This is now one of my favorite books. ( )
  CatherineBurkeHines | Nov 28, 2018 |
Sayers argues that the trinity is part of man's inherent nature and illustrates this through an examination of the human creative process. Her views of literature are fairly traditional and may strike some as outdated. But her observations on the formal unities and on the differences between literary art and reality are fascinating. Christian readers will find her insights into the analogy of human to divine nature fascinating. Highly recommended for writers and "close" readers who want new ways of looking at literature as well as those interested in Christian theology. ( )
  kaitanya64 | Jan 3, 2017 |
I cannot pretend to have comprehended all of this, but here is what I gleaned.

She uses the terminology of Christianity, such as Trinity and Creator, to instruct on the art of artistic creation, with a focus on writing, since she is a writer. Her "trinity" is the Father (artist or Idea of the work), the Son (practical craft of material creation such as plot, grammar, etc.) and the Spirit (the power of the work in the minds of those who behold it). From there she proceeds to describe how and why a work fails or succeeds. Demonstrating that it is usually a lack in one or the other of the trinity. I love her insights into the craft of writing. She uses the playwright as a special example, because it is easier to demonstrate the above ideas in a drama written for the stage. Fascinating stuff.

At the very beginning and towards the end of the book, she points out the differences in the way language is used. Describing the scientific/literal bent of the world she was living in (WWII era), and the inclination of scientists and behaviorists of the day to dismiss analogy from their terminology, she points out the futility of it, since human experience of our world is really the only thing we have to go on. At the end, there is a bit of a rant over the use of the words "problem" and "solution." She spends a chapter disputing that view of life and suggesting that when a problem has been solved, it is then finished or dead. This is no way to live life and leads to great disappointment, since most of life is not a detective novel and therefore cannot be "solved." She suggests that a better way to approach life is to apply our natural creativeness and through that create a new thing which has not been before. This is really a chapter which must be read to be fully appreciated, it offers a great way to look at life and this world.

Now, if what I've written above does not make a lot of sense, don't blame Dorothy L. Sayers, blame me for my lack of descriptive abilities! ( )
  MrsLee | Aug 27, 2012 |
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» Añade otros autores (2 posibles)

Nombre del autorRolTipo de autor¿Obra?Estado
Sayers, Dorothy L.autor principaltodas las edicionesconfirmado
L'Engle, MadeleineIntroducciónautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
Debes iniciar sesión para editar los datos de Conocimiento Común.
Para más ayuda, consulta la página de ayuda de Conocimiento Común.
Título canónico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Fecha de publicación original
Personas/Personajes
Lugares importantes
Acontecimientos importantes
Películas relacionadas
Premios y honores
Información procedente del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Epígrafe
Información procedente del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
I propose to state the doctrine of the Trinity of God . . . in doing which, if I shall be led on to mention one or two points of detail, it must not be supposed, as some persons strangely mistake as if such additional statements were intended for explanation, whereas they leave the Great Mystery just as it was before, and are only useful as impressing on our mind what it is which the Catholic Church means to assert and to make it a matter of real faith and apprehension, and not a mere assemblage of words. — JOHN HENRY NEWMAN: Sermon on the Trinity
In the case of man, that which he creates is more expressive of him that that which he begets. The image of the artist and the poet is imprinted more clearly on his works than on his children. — NICHOLAS BERDYAEV: The Destiny of Man
Dedicatoria
Información procedente del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
In gloriam maiorem sancti Athanasii qui opificis aeterni divinitatem contra mundum vindicavit item Ecclesiarum Britannicarum per duces suos contra mundum operum humanorum sancitatem hodie asserentium
Primeras palabras
Información procedente del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
This book is not an apology for Christianity, nor is it an expression of personal religious belief.
Citas
Últimas palabras
Información procedente del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
(Haz clic para mostrar. Atención: puede contener spoilers.)
Aviso de desambiguación
Editores de la editorial
Blurbistas
Idioma original
DDC/MDS Canónico
LCC canónico

Referencias a esta obra en fuentes externas.

Wikipedia en inglés (1)

Dorothy L Sayers' great lay contemporaries in the Church of England were T. S. Eliot, C.S. Lewis and Charles Williams, but none of them wrote a book quite like The Mind of the Maker. In this crisp, elegant exercise in theology, Sayers illuminates the doctrine of the Trinity by relating it to the process of writing fiction, a process about which she could speak with complete authority. She illustrates her thesis with many examples drawn from her own books, and even illuminates the Christian heresies by analysing certain failures of creation which regularly occur in literature. This marvellous classic describes the creative process in terms of the arts and shows that literature can cast light on theology and vice versa.

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