PortadaGruposDe qué se hablaExplorarZeitgeist
Buscar en el sitio
Este sitio utiliza cookies para ofrecer nuestros servicios, mejorar el rendimiento, análisis y (si no estás registrado) publicidad. Al usar LibraryThing reconoces que has leído y comprendido nuestros Términos de Servicio y Política de Privacidad. El uso del sitio y de los servicios está sujeto a estas políticas y términos.
Hide this

Resultados de Google Books

Pulse en una miniatura para ir a Google Books.

Cargando...

A Town Like Alice (1950)

por Nevil Shute

Otros autores: Ver la sección otros autores.

MiembrosReseñasPopularidadValoración promediaMenciones
3,3271293,068 (4.04)429
"A tale of love and war, follows its enterprising heroine from Malayan jungle during World War II to the rugged Australian outback." -- Cover, p.4.
  1. 00
    Evidence Not Seen: A Woman's Miraculous Faith in the Jungles of World War II por Darlene Deibler Rose (CherylLonski)
    CherylLonski: One is a work of fiction, the other is a biographical account. One author is male, the other female. One British, one American. Yet the stories intersect in interesting ways in their telling of a painful time in world history.
  2. 00
    The Promise of Rain por Donna Milner (jayne_charles)
    jayne_charles: More POW hell
  3. 00
    In the Wet por Nevil Shute (Booksloth)
  4. 00
    The Flamboya Tree: Memories of a Mother's Wartime Courage por Clara Kelly (whymaggiemay)
    whymaggiemay: Though fiction, the war experiences of Jean Padgett are based in fact from the Island of Sumatra, and gives a good view of what was going on on other islands in the Pacific.
Cargando...

Inscríbete en LibraryThing para averiguar si este libro te gustará.

No hay Conversaciones actualmente sobre este libro.

» Ver también 429 menciones

Inglés (123)  Danés (4)  Alemán (1)  Todos los idiomas (128)
Mostrando 1-5 de 128 (siguiente | mostrar todos)
This is the most famous novel by British author and engineer Nevil Shute. It is a novel of three parts: in the first and by far the most dramatic part, a young lady Jean Paget recounts to her lawyer Noel Strachan (who is the overall narrator of the novel) her experiences during the war in Malaya after the Japanese invaded, as part of a party of British women and children being marched around the country with no one wanting to take responsibility for their fate. Due to the privations of the forced march, poor food and disease, half of the party die en route. Jean assumes responsibility for the group's welfare. She meets an Australian prisoner of war Joe Harman who helps the party by stealing chickens for them; however, he is caught by the Japanese, horribly beaten and crucified and left for dead. Sometime after this, Jean and her party are able to establish themselves relatively securely in a Malay village working in the paddy fields for the remaining three years of the war.

In the second part, having discovered a few years later that Joe survived his torture, Jean visits Australia to try to track him down across the outback; at the same time, unbeknownst to her, Joe is visiting England to look for her. They finally meet and, in the third and least dramatic part, they get together romantically and build a life in the Queensland outback, Jean using her entrepreneurial skills to start a string of business and build up the (fictional) township of Willstown so that it can become "a town like Alice (Springs)". There was perhaps rather too much detail in this section than most most British readers are likely to want to know about breeding of cattle and how to start up a business in the outback. That said, it is an uplifting story of how Jean and Joe are able to overcome adversity to build a life together.

This edition contains an introduction by Eric Lomax, a prisoner of war on the notorious Burma-Siam railway, whose experiences were described in The Railway Man, made into a film starring Colin Firth and Nicole Kidman. The introduction helpfully warns the reader at the outset in bold letters that it gives away details of the plot, so I read it only after finishing the book ( )
  john257hopper | Jan 10, 2022 |
I knew the title of this book, perhaps from the play on words of The Jam's song 'A Town Called Malice', but had no idea what the story was about. The first half of the novel, based on the real life mistreatment of Dutch female prisoners of war by the Japanese on the island of Sumatra, was very powerfully written and took me by surprise.

Like the 1980s series Tenko, a young woman named Jean Paget and thirty other women and children are taken prisoner by the Japanese and marched around Malaya by guards who can't or won't find a camp for them to live in. While being moved between small villages, Jean meets an Australian soldier called Joe who tries to help the women by 'acquiring' drugs, soap and food for them. When he is caught by the Japanese, Jean believes that he has been brutally killed and blames herself. After the war, the story - narrated in plain, undramatic language by Jean's London solicitor Noel Strachan - shifts to London and then Australia, after Jean inherits a considerable sum of money, managed by Noel and his law firm, and returns to Malaya to repay the villagers who helped her and the other women to survive. She makes a shocking discovery while abroad which prompts her to move to the Australian outback and apply her magic touch to a small town there. Although the novel is billed as a romance, the Australian chapters reminded me much more of The Flying Doctors than purple prose like The Thorn Birds, with the dramatic rescue of a stockman thrown in for good measure!

Jean Paget, told through the elderly but lovesick eyes of Strachan the solicitor (and a male author) could have turned into a bit of a fantasy figure, but I found myself believing in her strength and admiring her pragmatic nature. She herds the dwindling group of women and children through Malaya, taking on the smallest child of one woman who dies, and liaises with the local communities, knowing how to speak the language. When the last Japanese guard dies, she arranges for them all to pay their way in a small village by working in the paddy fields. In Australia, determined to make the small Gulf town where she settles into 'a town like Alice' (Springs), she sets up a shoe-making factory and builds an ice cream parlour, cinema, laundrette and swimming baths to persuade the young women to stay in town and not leave for bigger cities. Jean is one-woman dynamo who is deprived of her own voice - Strachan is retelling her story through the letters she sent him - yet her success at the everything she touches is strangely admirable and not annoying.

Published in 1950 and written about the war years, there is a good deal of racism in the story, especially in Australia, although the Japanese guards in Malaya are not all portrayed as monsters, and of course sexism is at the heart of the plot (Jean's money is put in trust until she is 35!), but both forms of prejudice were (and possibly still are) sadly true to life. The animal cruelty is also hard to read - 'Oh, do you need a soft lining for your alligator skin shoes? I'll just pop off and kill a few wallabies, leaving their motherless babies to be raised on the station at pets.'

I found this a very engaging and educational story, with a strong female protagonist - and a good book with which to finish the year! ( )
  AdonisGuilfoyle | Dec 31, 2021 |
A Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute (1987)
  arosoff | Jul 10, 2021 |
This story of British Jean Paget and Australian Joe Harmon's unlikely romance spans three continents over several years. Their common bravery through the atrocities as WWII prisoners of war makes for an enjoyable read. The book is laced with racist language perhaps acceptable at the time of writing, but offensive to 21st century ears. Still, the story is unique and entertaining. ( )
  elifra | Jun 30, 2021 |
The first half is pretty good, but the second is rubbish. Plus the racist, sexist, jingoistic nonsense throughout mean that it is a completely unnecessary read. Not good enough to make the bad bits worth tolerating. One to fade into history. ( )
  elahrairah | Jun 17, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 128 (siguiente | mostrar todos)

» Añade otros autores (30 posible)

Nombre del autorRolTipo de autor¿Trabajo?Estado
Nevil Shuteautor principaltodas las edicionescalculado
Bailey, RobinNarradorautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
Hunt, NeilNarradorautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
Debes iniciar sesión para editar los datos de Conocimiento Común.
Para más ayuda, consulta la página de ayuda de Conocimiento Común.
Título canónico
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Fecha de publicación original
Personas/Personajes
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Lugares importantes
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Eventos importantes
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Películas relacionadas
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Premios y honores
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Epígrafe
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
How many loved your moments of glad grace,
And loved your beauty with love false or true;
But one man loved the pilgrim soul in you,
And loved the sorrows of your changing face.
— W. B. Yeats
Dedicatoria
Primeras palabras
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
James MacFadden died in March 1905 when he was forty-seven years old; he was riding in the Driffield Point-to-Point.
On the publication of this book I expect to be accused of falsifying history, especially in regard to the march and death of the homeless women prisoners. (Author's Note)
[Introduction] I was born in 1919.
Citas
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
The soldiers ... came to the evacuees sitting numbly in the veranda of the accounts office.... they were ordered to give up all fountain-pens and wrist-watches and rings.... Jean lost her watch and had her bag searched for a fountain-pen, but she had packed it in her luggage.
Ayer Penchis ... was a Malay village which housed the labour for a number of rubber plantations in the vicinity. The latex-processing plant of one stood near at hand and by it was a sort of palm thatch barn, used normally for smoking sheets of the raw rubber hung on horizontal laths.
"People who spent the war in prison camps have written a lot of books about what a bad time they had.... They don't know what it was like, not being in a camp."
Últimas palabras
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
(Click para mostrar. Atención: puede contener spoilers.)
(Click para mostrar. Atención: puede contener spoilers.)
(Click para mostrar. Atención: puede contener spoilers.)
Aviso de desambigüedad
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
"A Town Like Alice" was originally published as "The Legacy".
Editores
Blurbistas
Idioma original
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
DDC/MDS Canónico
Canonical LCC

Referencias a esta obra en fuentes externas.

Wikipedia en inglés

Ninguno

"A tale of love and war, follows its enterprising heroine from Malayan jungle during World War II to the rugged Australian outback." -- Cover, p.4.

No se han encontrado descripciones de biblioteca.

Descripción del libro
Resumen Haiku

Cubiertas populares

Enlaces rápidos

Valoración

Promedio: (4.04)
0.5 1
1 9
1.5 5
2 21
2.5 5
3 130
3.5 61
4 312
4.5 52
5 260

¿Este eres tú?

Conviértete en un Autor de LibraryThing.

 

Acerca de | Contactar | LibraryThing.com | Privacidad/Condiciones | Ayuda/Preguntas frecuentes | Blog | Tienda | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas de Figuras Notables | Primeros Reseñadores | Conocimiento Común | 166,266,635 libros! | Barra superior: Siempre visible