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Vittoria Cottage por D. E. Stevenson
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Vittoria Cottage (original 1949; edición 1973)

por D. E. Stevenson

MiembrosReseñasPopularidadValoración promediaMenciones
1717127,376 (3.83)20
Caroline opened the door and saw Mr. Shepperton standing on the step. "Oh, it's you!" she exclaimed in surprise. "Did you--were you expecting someone else?" he asked. "Only the Queen," replied Caroline, chuckling. "Don't mind me," she added. "I often go slightly mad." Caroline Dering, a widow with three grown children, lives a cheerful, quiet life near the idyllic English village of Ashbridge. But things are about to liven up, as daughter Leda announces a problematic engagement to the son of the local squire, son James returns from service and pursues romance with the squire's independent daughter, and sister Harriet, a famous actress who latest play has bombed, retreats to Ashbridge for a break. Then there's Robert Shepperton, a charming widower recovering from the losses of war at the local inn . . . These problems, as well as smaller challenges with an overbearing village organizer, the blustering Sir Michael, and Caroline's daily help ("who rejoices in the name of Comfort Podbury"), are resolved with all of D.E. Stevenson's flair for gentle humour, clever plotting, and characters who walk right off the page. Furrowed Middlebrow and Dean Street Press have also reprinted Music in the Hills and Winter and Rough Weather, which continue the stories of some of the characters from Vittoria Cottage. All the novels feature an introduction by Alexander McCall Smith. "A well-balanced novel that moves swiftly enough for any taste." Manchester Evening News "It is a family novel, and few writers can do this sort of thing better than Miss Stevenson." Glasgow Herald… (más)
Miembro:kayclifton
Título:Vittoria Cottage
Autores:D. E. Stevenson
Info:London : Collins, 1973.
Colecciones:Tu biblioteca
Valoración:**1/2
Etiquetas:Ninguno

Work Information

Villa Vitoria por D. E. Stevenson (1949)

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Mostrando 1-5 de 7 (siguiente | mostrar todos)
Caroline Dering, a middle-aged widow, lives at Vittoria Cottage. Nothing too dramatic happens. There are some dinner parties and some incidents involving neighbours. The Derings befriend a newcomer to the neighbourhood, Robert Shepperton. Caroline’s eldest daughter gets engaged and no one is very happy about it; Caroline and her sister (the actress Harriet Fane) visit each other; her son James returns home after three years in the army. And so on.

But this is a fascinating insight into postwar life in England, with rationing and rules about what one must do with eggs if one keeps more than a certain number of hens. And I like that Stevenson considers the concerns of a middle-aged widow worthy of this sort of attention -- and of this sort of romance.

She saw beauty in ordinary little things and took pleasure in it (and this was just as well because she had had very little pleasure in her life). She took pleasure in a well-made cake, a smoothly ironed napkin, a pretty blouse, laundered and pressed; she liked to see the garden well dug, the rich soil brown and gravid; she loved her flowers. When you are young you are too busy with yourself -- so Caroline thought -- you haven't time for ordinary little things but, when you leave youth behind, your eyes open and you see magic and mystery all around you: magic in the flight of a bird, the shape of a leaf, the bold arch of a bridge against the sky, footsteps at night and a voice calling in the darkness, the moment in a theatre before the curtain rises, the wind in the trees, or (in winter) an apple-branch clothed with pure white snow and icicles hanging from from a stone and sparkling with rainbow colours.

(I’m not sure how I feel about Stevenson’s portrayal of Caroline’s “daily help”, Comfort Podbury. Caroline obviously values Comfort’s friendship as well as her work -- Caroline has a lot of affection, sympathy and respect for Comfort, and so, it seems, does the author. But Stevenson is also very unflattering about Comfort’s obesity. Does that undermine the sympathy?) ( )
  Herenya | Jun 13, 2021 |
The first in the 3 book series about people related to the Johnstones of Mureth. ( )
  mirihawk | May 21, 2020 |
(Fiction, Vintage, Romance)

The work of D.E. Stevenson was recommended to me by our head librarian on one of my brief visits to our beautiful relatively new village library. We found on the shelf Vittoria Cottage, published in 1949 and the first of a trilogy.

I did enjoy the mid-twentieth century English village setting, but the plot was a little too much of a romance for me to be crazy about this book. 3 stars ( )
  ParadisePorch | Nov 1, 2016 |
Appallingly patronising towards the lower classes. One of the characters actually thought of a village woman as a peasant. Dated, even for 1949. ( )
  pamelad | Mar 23, 2016 |
Historical fiction, women's fiction, old-fashioned light romance--all of these descriptors fit this charming book, just released in electronic form by Endeavor Press.

Originally published in 1949 and set contemporaneously, this is only historical fiction in retrospect. Caroline Dering is a middle-aged widow, living quietly in a country village with her two adolescent daughters, worrying about her son who is in Malay fighting terrorist guerillas. (And yes, they are repeatedly referred to as Terrorists, with a capital T.) Robert Shepperton, widowed and left homeless by the war, comes to Ashbridge for an extended stay, looking for peace and quiet. They fall into a friendship, and maybe something more. Meanwhile, life goes on. There are domestic dramas, village personalities, and a visit from Caroline's actress sister, who charms Robert.

This doesn't have the pacing that a modern romance reader expects, but it is nevertheless a thoroughly enjoyable romance. ( )
  readinggeek451 | Oct 23, 2015 |
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Caroline opened the door and saw Mr. Shepperton standing on the step. "Oh, it's you!" she exclaimed in surprise. "Did you--were you expecting someone else?" he asked. "Only the Queen," replied Caroline, chuckling. "Don't mind me," she added. "I often go slightly mad." Caroline Dering, a widow with three grown children, lives a cheerful, quiet life near the idyllic English village of Ashbridge. But things are about to liven up, as daughter Leda announces a problematic engagement to the son of the local squire, son James returns from service and pursues romance with the squire's independent daughter, and sister Harriet, a famous actress who latest play has bombed, retreats to Ashbridge for a break. Then there's Robert Shepperton, a charming widower recovering from the losses of war at the local inn . . . These problems, as well as smaller challenges with an overbearing village organizer, the blustering Sir Michael, and Caroline's daily help ("who rejoices in the name of Comfort Podbury"), are resolved with all of D.E. Stevenson's flair for gentle humour, clever plotting, and characters who walk right off the page. Furrowed Middlebrow and Dean Street Press have also reprinted Music in the Hills and Winter and Rough Weather, which continue the stories of some of the characters from Vittoria Cottage. All the novels feature an introduction by Alexander McCall Smith. "A well-balanced novel that moves swiftly enough for any taste." Manchester Evening News "It is a family novel, and few writers can do this sort of thing better than Miss Stevenson." Glasgow Herald

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