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Minnesota rag : the dramatic story of the…
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Minnesota rag : the dramatic story of the landmark Supreme Court case that… (edición 1982)

por Fred W. Friendly

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622335,467 (3.42)6
"An informative and entertaining account of the variously comic, sordid, scandalous and high-minded doings that culminated in Near v. Minnesota, a landmark case in the history of freedom of the press." -- The New Yorker In 1927 the publisher Jay M. Near -- whose muck-raking newspaper indulged his anti-Semitic, anti-black, anti-Catholic and anti-labor prejudices -- was put out of business by a Minnesota gag law. This law allowed a single judge to bar publication of any newspaper found "malicious, scandalous or defamatory," set a dangerous precedent for prior restraint and curtailed freedom of the press. Near's case was eventually taken up by Colonel McCormick, the powerful publisher of the Chicago Tribune, who paid for the appeal to the Supreme Court. In 1931 Near v. Minnesota was decided 5 to 4 in Near's favor -- a decision that bears directly on freedom of the press today. "Ranging from the sleaze of the Minnesota underworld to the often bitchy byplay among members of the Supreme Court, [Friendly] has done a marvelous job." -- The Los Angeles Times Book Review "A very rich slice of Americana....The author creates a dramatic atmosphere and a pace that never flags." -- The New York Times… (más)
Miembro:RustBelt
Título:Minnesota rag : the dramatic story of the landmark Supreme Court case that gave new meaning to freedom of the press
Autores:Fred W. Friendly
Info:New York: Vintage Books, 1982, c1981. 243 p., [4] leaves of plates : ill. ; 21 cm. 1st Vintage Books ed
Colecciones:Tu biblioteca
Valoración:**1/2
Etiquetas:Ninguno

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Minnesota Rag por Fred W. Friendly

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Minnesota Rag by Fred W. Friendly was the Silver Gavel Award winner in 1982. The Silver Gavel Award is given every year by the American Bar Association for a work of nonfiction that best illuminates the legal system in some regard. This book was written by a proponent and protector of Freedom of the Press, about the 1931 Supreme Court case that defined (some say redefined) the meaning of Freedom of the Press. The case involves liers, cheats, mean vindictive people, and huge egos, but where this book really excelled was in the description of the Supreme Court at that point in time. Reading this book just proves that the controversies about the politicization of the Court have been going on for a long long time - probably from the beginning. It may be that I found that part the most fascinating because it was like reading about the Court of today and realizing that the same political fights about strict or liberal interpretation of the Constitution are still going on. At the time of this court case, Chief Justice William H. Taft (the former President) had just died and Charles Evans Hughes became the new Chief Justice. Hughes was a more liberal justice than Taft, which was a surprise to the Harding administration, and his influence allowed the decision to go as it did. This book was written to explain what the Doctrine of Prior Restraint was and how dangerous it is for democracy. It does that, and makes me want to go read more about the history of the Cour ( )
  benitastrnad | Jan 31, 2019 |
1683 Minnesota Rag, by Fred W. Friendly (read 2 Jan 1982) This is a book on Near v. Minnesota, a 1931 US Supreme Court case which elevated the prohibition against "prior restraint"--called "previous restraint" in that opinion--to constitutional doctrine. The book is the work of a journalist, and is poorly written and poorly organized. But it still tells an interesting story. The author says he worked three years on the book--it didn't show it. It seems the work of an amateur. ( )
  Schmerguls | Nov 15, 2008 |
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"An informative and entertaining account of the variously comic, sordid, scandalous and high-minded doings that culminated in Near v. Minnesota, a landmark case in the history of freedom of the press." -- The New Yorker In 1927 the publisher Jay M. Near -- whose muck-raking newspaper indulged his anti-Semitic, anti-black, anti-Catholic and anti-labor prejudices -- was put out of business by a Minnesota gag law. This law allowed a single judge to bar publication of any newspaper found "malicious, scandalous or defamatory," set a dangerous precedent for prior restraint and curtailed freedom of the press. Near's case was eventually taken up by Colonel McCormick, the powerful publisher of the Chicago Tribune, who paid for the appeal to the Supreme Court. In 1931 Near v. Minnesota was decided 5 to 4 in Near's favor -- a decision that bears directly on freedom of the press today. "Ranging from the sleaze of the Minnesota underworld to the often bitchy byplay among members of the Supreme Court, [Friendly] has done a marvelous job." -- The Los Angeles Times Book Review "A very rich slice of Americana....The author creates a dramatic atmosphere and a pace that never flags." -- The New York Times

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