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Early Greek Philosophy (Classics) por…
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Early Greek Philosophy (Classics) (original 1987; edición 1987)

por Jonathan Barnes (Autor)

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708525,172 (3.79)2
This anthology presents the early sages of Western philosophy and science who paved the way for Plato and Aristotle and their successors. Democritus's atomic theory of matter, Zeno's dazzling "proofs" that motion is impossible, Pythagorean insights into mathematics, Heraclitus's haunting and enigmatic epigrams-all form part of a revolution in human thought that relied on reasoning, forged the first scientific vocabulary, and laid the foundations of Western philosophy. Jonathan Barnes has painstakingly brought together the surviving Presocratic fragments in their original contexts, utilizing the latest research and a newly discovered major papyrus of Empedocles.… (más)
Miembro:ArabellaFasham
Título:Early Greek Philosophy (Classics)
Autores:Jonathan Barnes (Autor)
Info:Penguin Classics (1987), Edition: Reprint, 320 pages
Colecciones:Tu biblioteca
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Etiquetas:Ninguno

Work Information

Early Greek Philosophy por Jonathan Barnes (Editor) (1987)

Añadido recientemente porgregcarew, drbrand, jean.herpich, a.c.jones1990, gnav, Robbie1970, MadaDursma, davisclassicslib, ArabellaFasham
Bibliotecas de Figuras NotablesGillian Rose
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The early Greek philosophers, thinkers like Thales, Anaximander, Pythagoras, Parmenides, Zeno, Empedocles, Leucippus, are foundational for the Western intellectual tradition. I couldn’t imagine a better introductory book then this one on the subject. Below are a few quotes from Jonathan Barnes’s excellent 40 page introduction along with my brief comments:

“First and most simply, the Presocratics invented the very idea of science and philosophy. They hit upon that special way of looking at the world which is the scientific and rational way. They saw the world as something ordered and intelligible, its history following an explicable course and its different parts arranged in a comprehensible system. The world was not a random collection of bits, its history was not an arbitrary jumble of events.” ---------- This is central to their spirit of inquiry, an approach compatible with a modern physicist or chemist.

“Nor was the world a series of events determined by the will or the caprice of the gods. The Presocratics were not atheists: they allowed the god into their brave new world, and some of them attempted to produce an improved and rationalized theology in place of the anthropomorphic divinities of the Olympian pantheon. But their theology had little to do with religion, and they removed most of the traditional functions of the gods. Their thunder was no longer the growling of a minatory Zeus.” ----------- Again, the Presocratics have kindred spirits in the science departments at modern universities.

Jonathan Barnes goes on to write how the Presocratics explained the world in ways that were systematic and economical, that is, these early philosophers wanted to “explain as much as possible in terms of as little as possible.” Some of their key concepts were order (kosmos), nature (phusis), origins (arche) , and reason (logos). --------- These Greek words are supercharged with meaning. I use one English word for simplicity sake. How supercharged? The author does a fine job elaborating.

The actual words of the Presocratics have come down to us as fragments. Here are several of my favorites:

Xenophanes
“But if cows and horses or lions had hands and drew with their hands or made the things men make, then horses would draw the forms of gods like horses, cows like cows, and each would make their bodies similar in shape to their own.”

Heraclitus
“The uncomprehending, when they hear, are like the deaf. To them applies the saying: though present they are absent.”

Democritus
“To a wise man the whole earth is accessible; for the country of a great soul is the whole world.”

“The desire for more destroys what is present – like Aesop’s dog.”

“One should tell the truth, not speak at length.” ( )
  Glenn_Russell | Nov 13, 2018 |
In many ways we can simply make the statement that the Greeks invented philosophy. For roughly eleven centuries Greek philosophy held first place in the world. Pre-Socratics as the title of these philosophers is a bit of a misnomer since they actually over lapoed the life of Socrates. Nonetheless, these are important contributions and well worth reading.
  gmicksmith | Jul 15, 2018 |

The early Greek philosophers, thinkers like Thales, Anaximander, Pythagoras, Parmenides, Zeno, Empedocles, Leucippus, are foundational for the Western intellectual tradition. I couldn’t imagine a better introductory book then this one on the subject. Below are a few quotes from Jonathan Barnes’s excellent 40 page introduction along with my brief comments:

“First and most simply, the Presocratics invented the very idea of science and philosophy. They hit upon that special way of looking at the world which is the scientific and rational way. They saw the world as something ordered and intelligible, its history following an explicable course and its different parts arranged in a comprehensible system. The world was not a random collection of bits, its history was not an arbitrary jumble of events.” ---------- This is central to their spirit of inquiry, an approach compatible with a modern physicist or chemist.

“Nor was the world a series of events determined by the will or the caprice of the gods. The Presocratics were not atheists: they allowed the god into their brave new world, and some of them attempted to produce an improved and rationalized theology in place of the anthropomorphic divinities of the Olympian pantheon. But their theology had little to do with religion, and they removed most of the traditional functions of the gods. Their thunder was no longer the growling of a minatory Zeus.” ----------- Again, the Presocratics have kindred spirits in the science departments at modern universities.

Jonathan Barnes goes on to write how the Presocratics explained the world in ways that were systematic and economical, that is, these early philosophers wanted to “explain as much as possible in terms of as little as possible.” Some of their key concepts were order (kosmos), nature (phusis), origins (arche) , and reason (logos). --------- These Greek words are supercharged with meaning. I use one English word for simplicity sake. How supercharged? The author does a fine job elaborating.

The actual words of the Presocratics have come down to us as fragments. Here are several of my favorites:

Xenophanes
“But if cows and horses or lions had hands and drew with their hands or made the things men make, then horses would draw the forms of gods like horses, cows like cows, and each would make their bodies similar in shape to their own.”

Heraclitus
“The uncomprehending, when they hear, are like the deaf. To them applies the saying: though present they are absent.”

Democritus
“To a wise man the whole earth is accessible; for the country of a great soul is the whole world.”

“The desire for more destroys what is present – like Aesop’s dog.”

“One should tell the truth, not speak at length.” ( )
  GlennRussell | Feb 16, 2017 |
Ever since listening to Peter Adamson's *History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps* podcast I was very curious to explore the writings of these early thinkers. In this book, Jonathan's Barnes translation and editorial arrangement provides a high speed "fly by" of the presocratic philosophers. Context is minimal, but the scope is impressive, especially considering the small size of the volume. Readers will not finish this book ready to write a detailed theory piece on the writings of Anaxagoras (at least, I didn't), but they will discover who Anaxagoras is and how his ideas build on the critical questions of his day. I came away from this book profoundly more appreciative for how strong the philosophical "tradition" was prior to Plato. And I doubt anyone can walk away without gaining a sense that the story goes back even farther than these fragments... but today, these fragments are as far back as we can go.
1 vota jamesshelley | Nov 22, 2015 |
A good reader in the beginnings of Western thought.
  Fledgist | Jun 7, 2007 |
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Hail, children of Zeus, grant a sweet song and tell of the holy race of the immortals who exist forever, those who came from Earth and from starry Heaven and from dark Night, and those whom the salt Sea reared, and the gods, givers of good things, who came from them.
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This anthology presents the early sages of Western philosophy and science who paved the way for Plato and Aristotle and their successors. Democritus's atomic theory of matter, Zeno's dazzling "proofs" that motion is impossible, Pythagorean insights into mathematics, Heraclitus's haunting and enigmatic epigrams-all form part of a revolution in human thought that relied on reasoning, forged the first scientific vocabulary, and laid the foundations of Western philosophy. Jonathan Barnes has painstakingly brought together the surviving Presocratic fragments in their original contexts, utilizing the latest research and a newly discovered major papyrus of Empedocles.

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