PortadaGruposCharlasExplorarPanorama actual
Buscar en el sitio
Este sitio utiliza cookies para ofrecer nuestros servicios, mejorar el rendimiento, análisis y (si no estás registrado) publicidad. Al usar LibraryThing reconoces que has leído y comprendido nuestros Términos de Servicio y Política de Privacidad. El uso del sitio y de los servicios está sujeto a estas políticas y términos.
Hide this

Resultados de Google Books

Pulse en una miniatura para ir a Google Books.

Cargando...

Cloud Cuckoo Land (2021)

por Anthony Doerr

Otros autores: Ver la sección otros autores.

MiembrosReseñasPopularidadValoración promediaMenciones
1,678928,575 (4.23)136
"From the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of perhaps the most bestselling and beloved literary fiction of our time comes a triumph of imagination and compassion, a soaring novel about children on the cusp of adulthood in a broken world, who find resilience, hope, and story. The heroes of Cloud Cuckoo Land are children trying to figure out the world around them, and to survive. In the besieged city of Constantinople in 1453, in a public library in Lakeport, Idaho, today, and on a spaceship bound for a distant exoplanet decades from now, an ancient text provides solace and the most profound human connection to characters in peril. They all learn the story of Aethon, who longs to be turned into a bird so that he can fly to the paradise of Cloud Cuckoo Land, a better world. Twelve-year-old Anna lives in a convent where women toil all day embroidering the robes of priests. She learns to read from an old Greek tutor she encounters on her errands in the city. In an abandoned priory, she finds a stash of old books. One is Aethon's story, which she reads to her sister as the walls of Constantinople are bombarded by armies of Saracens. Anna escapes, carrying only a small sack with bread, salt fish-and the book. Outside the city walls, Anna meets Omeir, a village boy who was conscripted, along with his beloved pair of oxen, to fight in the Sultan's conquest. His oxen have died; he has deserted. In Lakeport, Idaho, in 2020, Seymour, a young activist bent on saving the earth, sits in the public library with two homemade bombs in pressure cookers-another siege. Upstairs, eighty-five-year old Zeno, a former prisoner-of-war, and an amateur translator, rehearses five children in a play adaptation of Aethon's adventures. On an interstellar ark called The Argos, Konstance is alone in a vault with sacks of Nourish powder and access to all the information in the world-or so she is told. She knows Aethon's story through her father, who has sequestered her to protect her. Konstance, encased on a spaceship decades from now, has never lived on our beloved Earth. Alone in a vault with sacks of Nourish powder and access to "all the information in the world," she knows Aethon's storythrough her father. Like Marie-Laure and Werner in All the Light We Cannot See, Konstance, Anna, Omeir, Seymour, the young Zeno, the children in the library are dreamers and misfits on the cusp of adulthood in a world the grown-ups have broken. They through their own resilience and resourcefulness, and through story. Dedicated to "the librarians then, now, and in the years to come," Anthony Doerr's Cloud Cuckoo Land is about the power of story and the astonishing survival of the physical book when for thousands of years they were so rare and so feared, dying, as one character says, "in fires or floods or in the mouths of worms or at the whims of tyrants." It is a hauntingly beautiful and redemptive novel about stewardship-of the book, of the Earth, of the human heart"--… (más)
  1. 30
    El atlas de las nubes por David Mitchell (nicole_a_davis)
    nicole_a_davis: Both have stories that span multiple time periods and are seemingly unconnected until the end.
  2. 20
    Station Eleven por Emily St. John Mandel (JenMDB)
  3. 10
    Fahrenheit 451 (Ave Fenix) por Ray Bradbury (JenMDB)
  4. 00
    El asno de oro por Apuleius (M_Clark)
    M_Clark: The Golden Ass is the basis, together with The Birds, for the ancient story Cloud Cuckoo Land. It also happens to be a tremendously entertaining novel from the days of the Roman Empire.
  5. 00
    Bewilderment por Richard Powers (Tinwara)
    Tinwara: Seymour in Cloud Cuckoo Land strongly reminded me of the young Robin in Bewilderment. If Seymour was your favorite character in Cloud Cuckoo Land, go for Bewilderment next!
Cargando...

Inscríbete en LibraryThing para averiguar si este libro te gustará.

No hay Conversaciones actualmente sobre este libro.

» Ver también 136 menciones

Mostrando 1-5 de 87 (siguiente | mostrar todos)
I read this for my read world book club. It is our September 2022 book selection. It’s a perfect discussion book and I would have loved to do this as a buddy read too.

I found it to be completely engrossing, It is long but it didn’t feel long. There are short chapters with alternating perspectives and for me the book was a page-turner.

Brilliantly written and constructed.

There were multiple time periods and multiple characters but even though I wasn’t sure how they were all connected I enjoyed every part. As I read I had some correct guesses and some times when I didn’t even know what connection to guess.

This is both historical fiction and speculative fiction.

As I read I looked up information about the Fall of Constantinople.

Wow! I loved this all the way through and then I got to a part toward the end of chapter 18 and Wow! Wow! Wow! The book felt nearly perfect to me until the second to last chapter. In the second to last chapter Why didn’t Zeno get the pack to a place away from everyone/everything and then run away from it?! I didn’t like what he did instead and I see why the author is thinking what he did made sense but it didn’t make sense to me. In the last chapter I liked Kondstance’s actions and enjoyed where she ended up but I wanted to much more. She is in this small sparsely populated place but what has become of the world in general?! She/they are able to forage for food and grow crops so that says something, but what else? I wanted to know a LOT more.

Konstance, Zeno, Seymour, Anna, and Omeir, and many supporting characters including both humans and animals. I liked all their stories, though most of the time some more than others. I’m glad that Konstance’s sections both started and ended the book. The story within the story was not my favorite part on its own but I enjoyed it in its various contexts. I loved how each story weaved together and got connected. Many different places too: The Argos, Idaho (Lakeport, the Lakeport Public Library, a correctional facility, Boise), Constantinople, Korea, roads to Edrine, Constantinople, etc., the Rhodope Mountains of Bulgaria, and Qaanaaq. The story is brilliantly constructed. The characters and their relationships are interesting and memorable.

I appreciated how the topical issue of climate change has a central role in this book.

There is an Author’s Note and a Reading Group Guide in the back of the book.

4-1/2 stars ( )
  Lisa2013 | Jul 23, 2022 |
I'm rarely impressed with novels about writers, but novels about readers and their books ... we are all readers, and this is a book. It's about how we cling to stories and are inspired by them, how we value them to the point of preserving them through trials spanning centuries. Doerr goes as far back as the siege of Constantinople in reaching for examples, and emphasizes the inspiration theme in our present. It's hard to imagine any text that's existed to the present going missing from this point forward, now that we have achieved our electronic information age, but Doerr imagines exactly one such threat. I like these books that jump forward and backward in time, leaving you guessing how their scenes will eventually relate and then drawing the strings together in a tidy bow.

There's magic in smaller touches, for instance the repeated references to things like Scheria, mentioned in 1453 and again on that interstellar ride, that can only happen because books have survived. And in the deep sense of time being conveyed, as when the starship looks back on the fall of Constantinople as so long ago, and yet even its citizens already regarded the ancient Greeks as ancient. I don't frequently use the world "lovely", but there's a measure of loveliness in the dreamy way that the novel's opening chapters unfold, and it's reflected again in how it ends, like a flower that opens its petals in the morning and then closes at night.

One thing I might have done differently. As a google exercise I recommend trying "Did Islam preserve or destroy western knowledge?" and see what you get. It feels disingenuous to centrally profile an instance where their culture was a threat to its preservation while when looked at more generally the world is deeply in its debt, and when the miracle of literature's preservation is this novel's central theme. ( )
  Cecrow | Jul 14, 2022 |
Well plotted; I admired how it came together. I cared for all the characters in all the various sub plots. ( )
  gbelik | Jul 11, 2022 |
2022 pandemic read. ( )
  bookczuk | Jul 7, 2022 |
A manuscript by the ancient Greek writer Antonius Diogenes, long thought to be lost to the ages, is discovered and translated into modern verse. The story it tells is as old as time itself: Aethon, a peasant shepherd, tires of his menial, arduous existence and dreams of a better life in Cloud Cuckoo Land, a mystical city in the sky where people live in a utopian world free from strife, hunger, and worry. Aethon’s journey to this version of the Promised Land is a challenging one, to say the least—he is transformed into a donkey, a fish, and a bird—but reach his goal he does. Once there, though, he quickly realizes that this fantastical location does not hold everything he wants after all. He soon yearns to return home to his friends, his sheep, and the simple life he now desperately misses.

Diogenes’s tale becomes integral to the lives of five different people, separated widely by both space (three different continents) and time (almost six centuries). For Anna, a young seamstress in 15th century Constantinople, it provides a way to survive a siege of the city, while for Omeir, an impoverished farmer pressed into the Sultan’s service on that siege, it represents a way to see past the physical deformity he has lived with since birth. In the last half of the 20th century, Zeno finds solace from his solitary life as the translator of Diogenes’ work until his path crosses that of Seymour, an emotionally disturbed young man for whom the book will offer redemption for a heinous act of violence. Finally, on a spaceship hurtling toward an unknown planet sometime in the future, Konstance discovers that the story gives her the resolve to escape her fate.

In Cloud Cuckoo Land, author Anthony Doerr tells this complex and altogether remarkable tale, deftly weaving the lives of the five major characters to each other and to the ancient book that connects them all. Told in brief segments that rotate between developing the backgrounds for each protagonist, it does take a while to get a handle on where the novel is going, but once that happens—for me, it was about a third of the way through—the reader is hooked. Doerr has created a set of people who we care about, even when they are doing bad things or making poor decisions. His fluid and affecting writing explores an impressive number of themes, including man’s inherent quest for knowledge, the blurry distinction between fiction and non-fiction, the power of hope and imagination through literature, an appreciation of the natural world, and our need to connect with other people. This is storytelling at its finest from a novelist who enhances his position as a master of the craft. ( )
  browner56 | Jul 1, 2022 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 87 (siguiente | mostrar todos)
Yes, libraries are awesome, and we all love books. But the artificial convolutedness of “Cloud Cuckoo Land” is not enough to confer any additional depth on Doerr’s simple, belabored theme, a theme that thumps through the novel insisting that every character kneel in reverent submission.
añadido por Lemeritus | editarThe Washington Post, Ronald Charles (Sitio de pago) (Sep 28, 2021)
 
Doerr does not overstate the importance of the story-within-a-story. If anything, he makes a point of reminding us again and again how easy it is for books to be lost across the ages — the staggering number of histories, tales, songs, account books, speeches, poems and stories that never made it through the meatgrinder of history....There are no heroes or villains, no global plots, no secret societies bent on controlling this lost manuscript. There's just a book thief, a boy and his ox, a messed-up kid who lost his best friend, a man putting on a children's play, a girl talking to a supercomputer....It is a book about books, a story about stories. It is tragedy and comedy and myth and fable and a warning and a comfort all at the same time. It says, Life is hard. Everyone believes the world is ending all the time. But so far, all of them have been wrong.It says that if stories can survive, maybe we can, too.
 
This is a novel so full that, if it can be said to be 'about' anything, perhaps it is about how things survive by chance, and through love. But the book is also keenly aware of the fact that humans have basically exhausted our chances, and it is time for a fierce and tenacious love to step up – by sharing and passing on what is mended and changed, like Diogenes’s book, with its delights and consolations – to save what we still have on Earth, and what is ours, as well as what we enjoy here, though it isn’t ours ... With all its tenderness for human life and animal life, and libraries, this novel nevertheless acknowledges that civilisation continues to insist on not going anywhere without packing its poisons.
añadido por Lemeritus | editarThe Guardian, Elizabeth Knox (Sep 24, 2021)
 
“Cloud Cuckoo Land" ... is, among other things, a paean to the nameless people who have played a role in the transmission of ancient texts and preserved the tales they tell. But it’s also about the consolations of stories and the balm they have provided for millenniums. It’s a wildly inventive novel that teems with life, straddles an enormous range of experience and learning, and embodies the storytelling gifts that it celebrates. It also pulls off a resolution that feels both surprising and inevitable, and that compels you back to the opening of the book with a head-shake of admiration at the Swiss-watchery of its construction.
añadido por Lemeritus | editarNew York Times, Marcel Theroux (Sitio de pago) (Sep 24, 2021)
 
“Stranger, whoever you are, open this to learn what will amaze you” wrote Antonius Diogenes at the end of the first century C.E.—and millennia later, Pulitzer Prize winner Doerr is his fitting heir. Around Diogenes' manuscript, "Cloud Cuckoo Land"—the author did exist, but the text is invented—Doerr builds a community of readers and nature lovers that transcends the boundaries of time and space....As the pieces of this magical literary puzzle snap together, a flicker of hope is sparked for our benighted world.
añadido por Lemeritus | editarKirkus Reviews (Jun 29, 2021)
 

» Añade otros autores

Nombre del autorRolTipo de autor¿Trabajo?Estado
Anthony Doerrautor principaltodas las edicionescalculado
Ireland, MarinNarradorautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
Jones, SimonNarradorautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
Debes iniciar sesión para editar los datos de Conocimiento Común.
Para más ayuda, consulta la página de ayuda de Conocimiento Común.
Título canónico
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Fecha de publicación original
Personas/Personajes
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Lugares importantes
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Eventos importantes
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Películas relacionadas
Premios y honores
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Epígrafe
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Chorus Leader: To work, men. How do you propose to name our city?

Peisetairos: How about Sparta? That’s a grand old name with a fine pretentious ring.

Euelpides: Great Hercules, call my city Sparta? I wouldn’t even insult my mattress by giving it a name like Sparta.

Peisetairos: Well, what do you suggest instead?

Chorus Leader: Something big, smacking of the clouds. A pinch of fluff and rare air, a swollen sound.

Peisetairos: I’ve got it! Listen—Cloud Cuckoo Land!

—Aristophanes, The Birds, 414 B.C.E.
Dedicatoria
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
For the librarians
then, now, and in the years to come/
Primeras palabras
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Prologue

For my dearest niece with hope that this brings you health and light
A fourteen-year-old girl sits cross-legged on the floor of a circular vault. A mass of curls haloes her head; her socks are full of holes. This is Konstance.
Citas
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
But books, like people, die. They die in fires or floods or in the mouths of worms or at the whims of tyrants. If they are not safeguarded, they go out of the world. And when a book goes out of the world, the memory dies a second death.
Or maybe, like all lunatics, the shepherd made his own truth, and so for him, true it was.
Each sign signifies a sound, and to link sounds is to form words, and to link words is to construct worlds.
“Boil the words you already know down to their bones,” Rex says, “and usually you find the ancients sitting there at the bottom of the pot, staring back up.”
Anna remembers something Licinius said: that a story is a way of stretching time.
Últimas palabras
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
(Click para mostrar. Atención: puede contener spoilers.)
Aviso de desambigüedad
Editores
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Blurbistas
Idioma original
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
DDC/MDS Canónico
LCC canónico

Referencias a esta obra en fuentes externas.

Wikipedia en inglés

Ninguno

"From the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of perhaps the most bestselling and beloved literary fiction of our time comes a triumph of imagination and compassion, a soaring novel about children on the cusp of adulthood in a broken world, who find resilience, hope, and story. The heroes of Cloud Cuckoo Land are children trying to figure out the world around them, and to survive. In the besieged city of Constantinople in 1453, in a public library in Lakeport, Idaho, today, and on a spaceship bound for a distant exoplanet decades from now, an ancient text provides solace and the most profound human connection to characters in peril. They all learn the story of Aethon, who longs to be turned into a bird so that he can fly to the paradise of Cloud Cuckoo Land, a better world. Twelve-year-old Anna lives in a convent where women toil all day embroidering the robes of priests. She learns to read from an old Greek tutor she encounters on her errands in the city. In an abandoned priory, she finds a stash of old books. One is Aethon's story, which she reads to her sister as the walls of Constantinople are bombarded by armies of Saracens. Anna escapes, carrying only a small sack with bread, salt fish-and the book. Outside the city walls, Anna meets Omeir, a village boy who was conscripted, along with his beloved pair of oxen, to fight in the Sultan's conquest. His oxen have died; he has deserted. In Lakeport, Idaho, in 2020, Seymour, a young activist bent on saving the earth, sits in the public library with two homemade bombs in pressure cookers-another siege. Upstairs, eighty-five-year old Zeno, a former prisoner-of-war, and an amateur translator, rehearses five children in a play adaptation of Aethon's adventures. On an interstellar ark called The Argos, Konstance is alone in a vault with sacks of Nourish powder and access to all the information in the world-or so she is told. She knows Aethon's story through her father, who has sequestered her to protect her. Konstance, encased on a spaceship decades from now, has never lived on our beloved Earth. Alone in a vault with sacks of Nourish powder and access to "all the information in the world," she knows Aethon's storythrough her father. Like Marie-Laure and Werner in All the Light We Cannot See, Konstance, Anna, Omeir, Seymour, the young Zeno, the children in the library are dreamers and misfits on the cusp of adulthood in a world the grown-ups have broken. They through their own resilience and resourcefulness, and through story. Dedicated to "the librarians then, now, and in the years to come," Anthony Doerr's Cloud Cuckoo Land is about the power of story and the astonishing survival of the physical book when for thousands of years they were so rare and so feared, dying, as one character says, "in fires or floods or in the mouths of worms or at the whims of tyrants." It is a hauntingly beautiful and redemptive novel about stewardship-of the book, of the Earth, of the human heart"--

No se han encontrado descripciones de biblioteca.

Descripción del libro
Resumen Haiku

Cubiertas populares

Enlaces rápidos

Valoración

Promedio: (4.23)
0.5
1 7
1.5
2 10
2.5 1
3 39
3.5 23
4 108
4.5 48
5 159

¿Este eres tú?

Conviértete en un Autor de LibraryThing.

 

Acerca de | Contactar | LibraryThing.com | Privacidad/Condiciones | Ayuda/Preguntas frecuentes | Blog | Tienda | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas heredadas | Primeros Reseñadores | De conocimiento común | 173,669,835 libros! | Barra superior: Siempre visible