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The Little Schemer

por Daniel P. Friedman, Matthias Felleisen (Autor)

Otros autores: Gerald J. Sussman (Prefacio)

Series: The Little Schemer series (1)

MiembrosReseñasPopularidadValoración promediaMenciones
614530,112 (4.17)2
The notion that "thinking about computing is one of the most exciting things the human mind can do" sets both The Little Schemer (formerly known as The Little LISPer) and its new companion volume, The Seasoned Schemer, apart from other books on LISP. The authors' enthusiasm for their subject is compelling as they present abstract concepts in a humorous and easy-to-grasp fashion. Together, these books will open new doors of thought to anyone who wants to find out what computing is really about. The Little Schemer introduces computing as an extension of arithmetic and algebra; things that everyone studies in grade school and high school. It introduces programs as recursive functions and briefly discusses the limits of what computers can do. The authors use the programming language Scheme, and interesting foods to illustrate these abstract ideas. The Seasoned Schemer informs the reader about additional dimensions of computing: functions as values, change of state, and exceptional cases. The Little LISPer has been a popular introduction to LISP for many years. It had appeared in French and Japanese. The Little Schemer and The Seasoned Schemer are worthy successors and will prove equally popular as textbooks for Scheme courses as well as companion texts for any complete introductory course in Computer Science.… (más)
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Mostrando 5 de 5
Reader response, freshly finished: Unsure how I feel about this book.

I really love the didactic style. I found it easy to keep pace. It taught Scheme in a really digestible way .... until the end.

At least, I think it stopped being that digestible by the end. As someone who knows Scheme and understands the concepts (reasonably well), I found slowing down to be difficult, and I also didn't feel the book convinced me why I'd go through the contortions the latter half of the book made me go through.
With my "non-programmer" hat on, I was willing to take the leaps of faith required in the first half of the book while it immediately paid off, by about "Shadows" I stopped seeing why I was learning what I was learning. The authors were being too cute (or maybe holding onto too much for the sequel "The Seasoned Schemer")

Anyone who wants to teach someone programming concepts would do well to learn this book and encourage the use of a REPL. It's a great book for someone who understands programming languages, PL theory, and PL concepts to learn how to teach them to others in an approachable way.

I'd like to see how someone who has no idea or agenda for learning how to program would do with this book. I feel most people would really benefit from the first half and then get frustrated by the second. ( )
  NaleagDeco | Dec 13, 2020 |
I've heard great things about this book.
I'm not enjoying it - too much work.
  scottkirkwood | Dec 4, 2018 |
cute, well thought out, quick, and enlightening. what more could you want? ( )
  jmilloy | Nov 8, 2017 |
I love the idea of using a Socratic dialogue, but the execution falls flat. I'd love to see an interactive version of this material, but at that point, finding a human mentor might be even better. I'd worked through the first 3 chapters of SICP a few years before reading this, so I flew through the first 7 chapters. I did find the food based examples tiresome after a while. More descriptive naming would benefit the presentation.

Chapter 8 I stumbled through by stepping through the execution of the examples. Chapter 9 is the climax, but here the conceit really breaks down, because I didn't find the dialogue leading me anywhere. Fortunately I found a discussion on Stack Overflow that more explicitly explained why the authors had taken the path they did: http://stackoverflow.com/a/11864862

After reading that comment, it was, a ha, now Chapter 8 makes sense, at least as far as motivation. I can't help but think that if the authors used this text in a classroom setting, they must have had extra materials, or at least more complete in class discussions about what was going on.

If you have a math background, might be better off looking for a text that explicitly covers the lambda calculus. ( )
  encephalical | Nov 1, 2013 |
I gave this a quick read a few years back, but didn't work through all the examples. I'm planning to re-read it, along with it's more recent brethren, in the near future, working through all the exercises along the way. ( )
  tlockney | Feb 5, 2012 |
Mostrando 5 de 5
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» Añade otros autores (2 posible)

Nombre del autorRolTipo de autor¿Trabajo?Estado
Daniel P. Friedmanautor principaltodas las edicionescalculado
Felleisen, MatthiasAutorautor principaltodas las edicionesconfirmado
Sussman, Gerald J.Prefacioautor secundariotodas las edicionesconfirmado

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Wikipedia en inglés (2)

The notion that "thinking about computing is one of the most exciting things the human mind can do" sets both The Little Schemer (formerly known as The Little LISPer) and its new companion volume, The Seasoned Schemer, apart from other books on LISP. The authors' enthusiasm for their subject is compelling as they present abstract concepts in a humorous and easy-to-grasp fashion. Together, these books will open new doors of thought to anyone who wants to find out what computing is really about. The Little Schemer introduces computing as an extension of arithmetic and algebra; things that everyone studies in grade school and high school. It introduces programs as recursive functions and briefly discusses the limits of what computers can do. The authors use the programming language Scheme, and interesting foods to illustrate these abstract ideas. The Seasoned Schemer informs the reader about additional dimensions of computing: functions as values, change of state, and exceptional cases. The Little LISPer has been a popular introduction to LISP for many years. It had appeared in French and Japanese. The Little Schemer and The Seasoned Schemer are worthy successors and will prove equally popular as textbooks for Scheme courses as well as companion texts for any complete introductory course in Computer Science.

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