PortadaGruposCharlasExplorarEstadísticas
Buscar en el sitio
Este sitio utiliza cookies para ofrecer nuestros servicios, mejorar el rendimiento, análisis y (si no estás registrado) publicidad. Al usar LibraryThing reconoces que has leído y comprendido nuestros Términos de Servicio y Política de Privacidad. El uso del sitio y de los servicios está sujeto a estas políticas y términos.
Hide this

Resultados de Google Books

Pulse en una miniatura para ir a Google Books.

Grocery : the buying and selling of food in…
Cargando...

Grocery : the buying and selling of food in America (edición 2017)

por Michael Ruhlman

MiembrosReseñasPopularidadValoración promediaMenciones
2331095,806 (3.5)7
Michael Ruhlman offers commentary on America's relationship with its food and investigates the overlooked source of so much of it -- the grocery store. In a culture obsessed with food -- how it looks, what it tastes like, where it comes from, what is good for us -- there are often more questions than answers. Ruhlman proposes that the best practices for consuming wisely could be hiding in plain sight -- in the aisles of your local supermarket. Using the human story of the family-run Midwestern chain Heinen's as an anchor to this journalistic narrative, he dives into the mysterious world of supermarkets and the ways in which we produce, consume, and distribute food. Grocery examines how rapidly supermarkets -- and our food and culture -- have changed since the days of your friendly neighborhood grocer. But rather than waxing nostalgic for the age of mom-and-pop shops, Ruhlman seeks to understand how our food needs have shifted since the mid-twentieth century, and how these needs mirror our cultural ones.… (más)
Miembro:ecb06c
Título:Grocery : the buying and selling of food in America
Autores:Michael Ruhlman
Info:New York, NY : Abrams Press, 2017.
Colecciones:Tu biblioteca
Valoración:***
Etiquetas:Ninguno

Información de la obra

Grocery: The Buying and Selling of Food in America por Michael Ruhlman

  1. 10
    Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal por Eric Schlosser (pbirch01)
    pbirch01: Ruhlman credits this book as the book that started the push for food systems that focused on quality not quantity.
  2. 10
    Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us por Michael Moss (pbirch01)
    pbirch01: Referenced in book and provides good backstory
  3. 00
    Tender at the Bone: Growing Up at the Table por Ruth Reichl (andomck)
Cargando...

Inscríbete en LibraryThing para averiguar si este libro te gustará.

No hay Conversaciones actualmente sobre este libro.

» Ver también 7 menciones

Mostrando 1-5 de 10 (siguiente | mostrar todos)
Excellent story, not only about the evolution of the grocery store in the US (and its future), but about the changes in our relationship with food- not just fuel, sometimes medicinal, often awful...but always a part of our daily lives. Ruhlmann is a wonderful writer- lucid and interesting. ( )
  PattyLee | Dec 14, 2021 |
This isn't a history of the grocery store, but a kind of survey about our grocery stores and where the food comes from. There's a lot of interesting information (mostly gleaned through the inner workings of a local Cleveland chain). Unfortunately, some sections are weak because Ruhlman uses them as his personal soapbox and makes poorly sourced claims about health and science. For example, a doctor's belief that glyphosate is the cause of poor gut flora, some waffling on GMOs, and health claims for food. The book also suffers from handwringing over lazy Americans who don't cook, which would be the solution to all our problems.

I really loved the stories about his father and the grocery store, though. ( )
  arosoff | Jul 11, 2021 |
The buying and selling of America is focused on a very select few companies, specific individuals. The story seems to be more of a dedication to the author's deceased father than about the grocery culture. ( )
  Sovranty | Jun 21, 2020 |
When I finished this book, my plans were to give it a 3 1/2 - star review. That was until I attended a January 2019 book forum in Buffalo where internationally-known retail consultant Burt Flickinger III critiqued Ruhlman's work, pointing out a number "inside baseball" discrepancies that the casual reader wouldn't have recognized unless they, too, were experts in the retail food arena. Flickinger liked the book, but took issue with a number of its conclusions. This critique aside, I did enjoy most of the book. Ruhlman provides context to a number of fascinating topics, including how stores maximize efforts to capture as many shopper dollars as possible and how the organic food craze has affected supermarkets. "Grocery" also provides interesting insights into different food sectors, including modern farming and the beef industry. But too much of the book felt inappropriately "me-focused" as Ruhlman went into great detail about his personal likes and dislikes, his dad's fascination with grocery stores and other nuggets that fall into the "TMI" arena. ( )
  brianinbuffalo | Feb 9, 2019 |
A little hard to be objective - I thought all this time I was the only one! I LOVE grocery shopping! It is without exaggeration the highlight of my week. I can fathom that some people might not love it, but consider it a "chore"? Would rather sit at home and click things online and have them delivered? Just suck all the joy out of life, why don't you!

And not only that, but Ruhlman traces his love of grocery shopping back to supermarket visits with his Dad - ME TOO! Periodic mass grocery shopping for the household was my Dad's task, too, and I loved being his helper. He made everything a game; and it didn't hurt that he too had a liberal hand in allowing me to toss into the cart any manner of dessert and snack items I wanted (because he loved them too). He did occasionally raise a very feeble protest against the sugary cereals me and my sibs insisted on eating – but he lost that battle one time when he brought home Whole Wheat Total and tried to claim it was “all they had.” We refused to eat it. We probably ate donuts or instant breakfast or pop-tarts instead.

But I should get back to the book. It has history, it has plenty of cultural and nutritional commentary, it has a big focus on the small Cleveland chain of grocery stores patronized by Ruhlman throughout his life, but it also has further digressions where Ruhlman channels his inner Michael Pollan to take us on in-depth exposes, interviews with experts, and adventures which reveal the underside of the simple act of grocery shopping.

I was on the edge of my seat throughout almost all of it... though I have to admit he lost me a couple of times, such as when he spent a chapter on supplements. Supplements!? Who cares! That's not food! And likewise when he spent a chapter traipsing through the woods with some dippy guy who talked about how we absorb healing chemicals just by being present in the forest. Again... THAT'S NOT FOOD.

And I'm sorry, one more quibble. As I said, I did appreciate his talking about his experiences with his Dad. But I think that in place of the endless "My Year Of..." books we were subject to a decade ago, now we all have to deal with "Coming to Terms with the Death of My Parent When You Thought All You Were Going to Learn about was Hawks/Whales/Hiking the Pacific Crest Trail/Supermarkets." Every non-fiction book these days seems to have to have a connection to the author's dead mother or father. I know, it sucks to lose your parents. Lots of things remind you of them. By all means, tell me about dear old Mom/Dad. But then they always get so maudlin and overwrought about it! S/he's dead, I know, it's very sad. That's exactly why you don't have to tell me that much about it. Ever heard of "nuff said'?

So, indeed, supermarkets ARE amazing. He references a New York Times Magazine article from 1996 that I distinctly remember reading and trying to share with my friends; similar to this book, it talked at lengths about the modern miracle that is the supermarket, and engaged in some cultural commentary and comparison as the writer visited some other styles of food procurement, such as some kind of farmer's market/open-air market in Spain, if I remember correctly... and that was cool too. Farmer's markets are awesome too. But that doesn't detract at all from my love of the supermarket. The friends with whom I tried to share my excitement over this article, were, I recall, definitely non-plussed, unfortunately.

Ruhlman also weighs in here and there with his opinions on best nutritional practices, which are nicely inconsistent. He has a beef against the misguided notions that eggs are bad for you and fat is bad for you (I forget which one of those gets his goat the most). He has plenty bad to say about processed food, but also doesn't hesitate to tell us all the less-than-chef-worthy things he loved in his childhood and to which he still doesn't seem totally averse.

My biggest takeaway was a quote from one of his interviewees, on the topic of how bad processed food is, and restaurant food is, and practically everything is, unless you bring it home and cook it yourself... bad for you inherently healthwise, and bad for you because its convenience leads you to eat too much of it. The quote was, more or less: "You want a diet? Eat anything you want - but cook it yourself." I love it! I could eat cookies and brownies and pasta Bolognese and all my favorites, so long as I cooked them myself, which would be a joy anyway. But I'd miss my frequent restaurant meals. And occasional Chinese/Vietnamese takeout. And occasional pizza. And... so this really wouldn't work for me.

What a joy this book was! I can hardly shut up about it. And I just ended up liking Ruhlman enough to want to read more by him - it seems he's written a lot. I see lots of food books coming into my Kindle in the year ahead! ( )
  Tytania | Jan 2, 2019 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 10 (siguiente | mostrar todos)
sin reseñas | añadir una reseña
Debes iniciar sesión para editar los datos de Conocimiento Común.
Para más ayuda, consulta la página de ayuda de Conocimiento Común.
Título canónico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Fecha de publicación original
Personas/Personajes
Lugares importantes
Eventos importantes
Películas relacionadas
Premios y honores
Epígrafe
Dedicatoria
Primeras palabras
Citas
Últimas palabras
Aviso de desambigüedad
Editores
Blurbistas
Idioma original
DDC/MDS Canónico
LCC canónico

Referencias a esta obra en fuentes externas.

Wikipedia en inglés

Ninguno

Michael Ruhlman offers commentary on America's relationship with its food and investigates the overlooked source of so much of it -- the grocery store. In a culture obsessed with food -- how it looks, what it tastes like, where it comes from, what is good for us -- there are often more questions than answers. Ruhlman proposes that the best practices for consuming wisely could be hiding in plain sight -- in the aisles of your local supermarket. Using the human story of the family-run Midwestern chain Heinen's as an anchor to this journalistic narrative, he dives into the mysterious world of supermarkets and the ways in which we produce, consume, and distribute food. Grocery examines how rapidly supermarkets -- and our food and culture -- have changed since the days of your friendly neighborhood grocer. But rather than waxing nostalgic for the age of mom-and-pop shops, Ruhlman seeks to understand how our food needs have shifted since the mid-twentieth century, and how these needs mirror our cultural ones.

No se han encontrado descripciones de biblioteca.

Descripción del libro
Resumen Haiku

Cubiertas populares

Enlaces rápidos

Valoración

Promedio: (3.5)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 6
2.5
3 14
3.5 1
4 22
4.5 3
5 3

¿Este eres tú?

Conviértete en un Autor de LibraryThing.

 

Acerca de | Contactar | LibraryThing.com | Privacidad/Condiciones | Ayuda/Preguntas frecuentes | Blog | Tienda | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas heredadas | Primeros Reseñadores | De conocimiento común | 171,641,933 libros! | Barra superior: Siempre visible