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Meetings with Remarkable Manuscripts por…
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Meetings with Remarkable Manuscripts (original 2016; edición 2018)

por Christopher De Hamel (Autor)

MiembrosReseñasPopularidadValoración promediaMenciones
6441226,742 (4.53)20
"This is a book about why medieval manuscripts matter. The idea for the book, which is entirely new, is to invite the reader into intimate conversations with twelve of the most famous manuscripts in existence and to explore with the author what they tell us about nearly a thousand years of medieval history -- and sometimes about the modern world too. Part travel book, part detective story, part conversation with the reader, Meetings with remarkable manuscripts conveys the fascination and excitement of encountering some of the greatest works of art in our culture which, in the originals, are to most people completely inaccessible."--… (más)
Miembro:rlangston
Título:Meetings with Remarkable Manuscripts
Autores:Christopher De Hamel (Autor)
Info:Penguin Press (2018), 656 pages
Colecciones:Tu biblioteca
Valoración:***1/2
Etiquetas:Ninguno

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Meetings with Remarkable Manuscripts por Christopher De Hamel (2016)

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Mostrando 1-5 de 12 (siguiente | mostrar todos)
A remarkable book. Mr De Hamel easily conveys his lifetime of interest, enthusiam and deep knowledge of manuscripts to me, the lay reader. He takes his 'meeting' quite literally. Introducing each manuscript as if it was an old frienc. Which in Mr De Hamel's case, they are. He knows them intimately. It is always impressive when someone with such detailed knowledge and expertise wears it lightly and communicats it easily. It is a common saying that if you make yourself an expert in something, no matter what, you will be able to make your living from it. Mr De Hamel is a case in point. A boyhood enthusiasm kindled by access to manuscripts in his local library turned into a commercial and academic career. The manuscripts he introduces are not as well known as other cultural artefacts of the times such as art and sculpture. But they display the same skills and dedication in their making. Craft and art combined. Wonderful. ( )
  Steve38 | Nov 22, 2020 |
Masterful. An authoritative, instructive, absorbing and entertaining account of some of the most beautiful documents in the world. ( )
  neal_ | Apr 10, 2020 |
The author introduces 12 mediaeval manuscripts, where they are kept, their contents, and history.

This book is as gorgeously illustrated as one would expect. The text is for the most part interesting with lots of little nuggets of information about the manuscripts, the libraries where they are kept. and some of the deductions we can make about the scribes and origins of the books. Obviously he couldn't reproduce the complete manuscripts -- and part of the point was that much of what we can learn from the manuscripts simply cannot be seen in any reproduction however excellent -- and there were times it felt a bit like reading museum wall labels for exhibits one can't see. Despite that it was worth persisting through the occasional dry spell for the overall enjoyment. I did wish at that the end that he'd said more about why these 12 rather than any others. ( )
  Robertgreaves | May 17, 2019 |
“This is a book about visiting important medieval manuscripts and what they tell us and why they matter.”

Job done.

Twelve chapters. Twelve manuscripts. Each chapter follows the same formula. De Hamel gives you the history of how the book came to be in its current library and describes his visit. Very interesting to see the different library cultures at play. I bet there are a few red faces at the Pierpont Morgan Library. He’s kind enough not to name names but they must know who they are. They he describes each manuscript and pulls out some of its more interesting features. Finally there’s some sort of detective work that might shine a light on the manuscript itself, but also into an obscure, or not so obscure, corner of history. There are lots of little discoveries along the way. Did you know that the Roman’s were aware that Venus and Mercury orbited the sun? Neither did I.

An incredibly interesting and readable book. The first night I looked up from it and realised it was four in the morning. The second night I knew what was going to happen so I napped before starting to read. The sun was up by the time I went to bed. This book has charm. I should think de Hamel does too. He managed to talk his way into examining each and every one of these books. The Codex Amiatinus. The Book of Kells. Obviously he has the credentials and knows the right people, but still... do you think they’d ever let me in to see the Hengwrt Chaucer? They’d take one look at me and think of that scene in Red Dragon where he eats the Blake. And quite right too. There’s a church near me with priceless medieval wall paintings. I went to see them and talked to the vicar for a while about the cost of insuring thatch (the church is thatched). I don’t know if I charmed her or bored her, but after a while she went off to do something, iron her cassock or something, and as soon as I was left alone with the paintings I climbed up on the pews and poked them all over.

One of the most interesting chapters for me was the Carmina Burana. I’m a fan of Orff’s musical number but mad never really thought about the source of the lyrics. It is of course a unique manuscript. All other copies are later printings edited from it. De Hamel’s analysis of its format as a kind of secular Breviary was particularly enlightening.

This is to say nothing of the illustrations in Remarkable Manuscripts. On its edge the book looks like geological strata. And those are just the illustrations that run to the edge of the page. The list of illustrations runs to seven pages of close type. Shame about the type face, but the paper is beautiful. Has a glow to it in the right light. Physically a well made book and all for thirty quid. That’s only three packets of fags. I borrowed my copy from the library. ( )
  Lukerik | Apr 4, 2019 |
While i love book this was just a bit too much information.
Probably great for rare book collectors ( )
  kakadoo202 | Sep 13, 2018 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 12 (siguiente | mostrar todos)
Meetings With Remarkable Manuscripts is the most enjoyable work of high scholarship I have ever read, if only because its author so clearly enjoyed compiling it.

Christopher de Hamel has spent most of his life researching and thinking about his subject, for years as the chief specialist in medieval manuscripts at Sotheby's, and now as librarian of the Parker library at Corpus Christi college, Cambridge, which possesses some important artefacts. Now that he has decided to share his passion with us, his schema is this: to ease us into the subject, he chooses 12 of the most important surviving illustrated manuscripts from the middle ages, held by great libraries around the world, and takes us with him to examine them all for ourselves.

Some of the manuscripts are perfectly exquisite, some ungainly, some inexplicable, but, as De Hamel says himself, "intrinsic beauty is a difficult conception in art history". Although pages from all 12 are beautifully reproduced in his book, and although he describes them, their histories and their meanings in minute detail, still the power of this volume lies not so much in its scholarship as in its love.
añadido por Cynfelyn | editarThe Guardian, Jan Morris (Dec 16, 2016)
 
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"This is a book about why medieval manuscripts matter. The idea for the book, which is entirely new, is to invite the reader into intimate conversations with twelve of the most famous manuscripts in existence and to explore with the author what they tell us about nearly a thousand years of medieval history -- and sometimes about the modern world too. Part travel book, part detective story, part conversation with the reader, Meetings with remarkable manuscripts conveys the fascination and excitement of encountering some of the greatest works of art in our culture which, in the originals, are to most people completely inaccessible."--

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