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The Revenge of Analog: Real Things and Why…
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The Revenge of Analog: Real Things and Why They Matter (original 2016; edición 2016)

por David Sax (Autor)

MiembrosReseñasPopularidadValoración promediaMenciones
337957,902 (3.6)5
"By now, we all know the mythology of the digital revolution: it improved efficiency, eliminated waste, and fostered a boom in innovation. But as business reporter David Sax shows in this clear-sighted, entertaining book, not all innovations are written in source code. In fact, businesses that once looked outdated are now springing with new life. Behold the Revenge of Analog. Sax has found story after story of entrepreneurs, small business owners, and even big corporations who've found a market selling not apps but real, tangible things. As e-books are supposedly remaking reading, independent bookstores have sprouted up across the country. As music supposedly migrates to the cloud, vinyl record sales have grown more than ten times over the past decade, generating more than half a billion dollars in 2015 alone. Even the offices of Silicon Valley icons like Google and Facebook increasingly rely on analog technologies like pen and paper for their business. Sax's work reveals not just an underreported trend in business, but a more fundamental truth about how humans shop, interact, and even think. Blending psychology and observant wit with old-fashioned reportage, Sax shows that humans need to work, sell, and live in the real world--not on a screen"-- "A funny thing has happened on our way to the digital utopia: we find ourselves increasingly missing reality. In this spirited book, David Sax has found story after story of entrepreneurs, artisans, and creators who make real money by selling real things. And they're not just local craftspeople, either. As paper is supposedly vanishing, Moleskine notebooks--a company founded in 1997, the same year as the first dot-com boom--has grown into a large multinational corporation. As music supposedly migrates to the cloud, vinyl record sales were up over 50 percent in 2015, and generated almost $350m in sales. And as retail was supposedly hitting bottom, star Silicon Valley companies like Apple and Amazon are investing in brick-and-mortar stores. Sax's work reveals not just an underreported trend in business but a more fundamental truth about how humans shop, interact, and even think. He captures what you're missing when you can't find a good song in a vast iTunes library, or can't recall the details of an ebook you read: any simulation of a sight or smell or activity you experience in the real world is just that--a simulation. As you read this enlightening book (preferably on paper!) that seemingly simple observation gathers ever more weight. The success stories in this book are eye-opening, even inspiring. You'll come away from this book with a renewed sense of what it means to work, live, and shop. It is the perfect gift for a book lover--something you can unwrap and hold. And for anyone who has grown weary of overnight billionaires and social media market-disruptors, it is proof positive that there's another side of the story"--… (más)
Miembro:shulera1
Título:The Revenge of Analog: Real Things and Why They Matter
Autores:David Sax (Autor)
Info:PublicAffairs (2016), Edition: 1, 304 pages
Colecciones:Read, My Library
Valoración:****
Etiquetas:nonfiction

Detalles de la obra

The Revenge of Analog: Real Things and Why They Matter por David Sax (2016)

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» Ver también 5 menciones

I really enjoyed this, though it was a little sad to read in the context of our COVID-19 year. A vivid reminder of how much we are missing, and why we miss it.
  RJ_Stevenson | Sep 8, 2020 |
The first half of this book resonated with me deeply. The further Sax strayed for the personal level of analog overtaking digital, the less interesting I found the book. Still, a solid 3.5 ( )
  kodermike | Jul 31, 2020 |
Interesting, self-referential look at how Analog(ue) things are succeeding in an increasingly digital world.

Divided into two sections, Revenge of Analog Things and Revenge of Analog Ideas he looks at Vinyl, Paper, Film, Board Games, Print, Retail, Work, School, Analog in Digital and Summer and takes a few case examples of how people are revisiting older methods to do things that could also be done in paper but that they find them better for the task. It doesn't dwell on things but does look at how the examples he chooses have changed how things work.

It felt a little superficial; a glimpse rather than an in-depth look at some of these things. I keep a list of the books I have read but I don't really review them in my diary. I use a fountain pen because it amuses me and helps with shoulder pain; I knit (sometimes so I don't kill people) but also because fashion is not often built for me but he doesn't look into these sort of reasons, he skims the surface. Another book that sparks ideas but doesn't dig the depths. ( )
  wyvernfriend | Sep 23, 2019 |
It took me a lot longer to get through this book than I should. I was drawn in by the title because I'm passionate about is analog and that's what I enjoy talking about with others.

This book feels great in the hand, which I know shouldn't affect the content, but did enhance the analog reading experience. Unfortunately, the content isn't as powerful as I wanted it to be.

The book is comprised of a series of vignettes offering examples of the 'comeback' of analog in industry segments that were predicted to be rutted by digital. Each of the chapters covers a very segment with very specific examples, such as revenge of:

paper as evidenced by the Moleskine notebook
vinyl as evidenced by record stores staying alive in the era of digital music
work as evidenced by digital/tech companies rallying employees around analog experiences like yoga or ping pong tables
summer as evidenced by camps with no-tech policies

It's well-written, but disappointing because it's so anecdotally argued.

The author's examples are very narrowly focused, sometimes oddly so. Several of his examples are Canadian businesses, which made me wonder if the book was a passion project with friends, personal connections, and firsthand observations/experience providing his entire dataset.

In every chapter, the data is basically sourced back to the same narrow and limited examples with no other exploration of corroborating 'evidence' or trends. (For example: how does a chapter on the rise of paper attributed to Moleskine notebooks not make a single mention of the BuJo movement??)

While the book offers insightful nuggets, there's no chord that weaves them together. The biggest failure of his book, in my opinion, is that it lacks any sort of attempt at a 'so what.' The lack of call to action and zero attempt at an analog rallying cry seems like a lost opportunity. Though based on a meaningful idea, the writing lacks clarity of purpose.

Although I was drawn to the book based on its title alone (and obviously others will be), I'm already an analog fan. I don't need to be convinced of the value of analog and I never doubted other fans are out there. I doubt this book will convert anyone who wasn't in the analog camp already. As a result, it's hard to know how or to whom to recommend it. ( )
  angiestahl | Oct 22, 2018 |
David Sax traz uma nova perspectiva sobre a inserção de novas tecnologias nas nossas vidas. Já vivemos tempo suficiente na chamada era digital para perceber que novas tecnologias nunca serão "substitutivas" mas sempre serão "complementares". Quantas vezes se ouviu que o CD substituiria o vinil, e hoje há tipos de músicas que são melhores gravadas no analógico do que no digital. Quando se achou que as telas substituiriam o papel, o que se vê é que ainda hoje, o papel é a melhor alternativa para um rápido registro de idéias.

A grande mensagem do livro é:

"O mundo é analógico e o digital sempre vai ser uma representação".
  edergoncalves | Jul 31, 2018 |
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"By now, we all know the mythology of the digital revolution: it improved efficiency, eliminated waste, and fostered a boom in innovation. But as business reporter David Sax shows in this clear-sighted, entertaining book, not all innovations are written in source code. In fact, businesses that once looked outdated are now springing with new life. Behold the Revenge of Analog. Sax has found story after story of entrepreneurs, small business owners, and even big corporations who've found a market selling not apps but real, tangible things. As e-books are supposedly remaking reading, independent bookstores have sprouted up across the country. As music supposedly migrates to the cloud, vinyl record sales have grown more than ten times over the past decade, generating more than half a billion dollars in 2015 alone. Even the offices of Silicon Valley icons like Google and Facebook increasingly rely on analog technologies like pen and paper for their business. Sax's work reveals not just an underreported trend in business, but a more fundamental truth about how humans shop, interact, and even think. Blending psychology and observant wit with old-fashioned reportage, Sax shows that humans need to work, sell, and live in the real world--not on a screen"-- "A funny thing has happened on our way to the digital utopia: we find ourselves increasingly missing reality. In this spirited book, David Sax has found story after story of entrepreneurs, artisans, and creators who make real money by selling real things. And they're not just local craftspeople, either. As paper is supposedly vanishing, Moleskine notebooks--a company founded in 1997, the same year as the first dot-com boom--has grown into a large multinational corporation. As music supposedly migrates to the cloud, vinyl record sales were up over 50 percent in 2015, and generated almost $350m in sales. And as retail was supposedly hitting bottom, star Silicon Valley companies like Apple and Amazon are investing in brick-and-mortar stores. Sax's work reveals not just an underreported trend in business but a more fundamental truth about how humans shop, interact, and even think. He captures what you're missing when you can't find a good song in a vast iTunes library, or can't recall the details of an ebook you read: any simulation of a sight or smell or activity you experience in the real world is just that--a simulation. As you read this enlightening book (preferably on paper!) that seemingly simple observation gathers ever more weight. The success stories in this book are eye-opening, even inspiring. You'll come away from this book with a renewed sense of what it means to work, live, and shop. It is the perfect gift for a book lover--something you can unwrap and hold. And for anyone who has grown weary of overnight billionaires and social media market-disruptors, it is proof positive that there's another side of the story"--

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