PortadaGruposSe habla deMásVisión actual
Este sitio utiliza cookies para ofrecer nuestros servicios, mejorar el rendimiento, para análisis y (si no está registrado) para publicidad. Al usar LibraryThing reconoces que has leído y comprendido nuestros Términos de Servicio y Política de Privacidad. Su uso del sitio y de los servicios está sujeto a estas políticas y términos.
Hide this

Resultados de Google Books

Pulse en una miniatura para ir a Google Books.

Cargando...

Spring: An Anthology for the Changing Seasons (2016)

por Melissa Harrison (Editor)

MiembrosReseñasPopularidadValoración promediaMenciones
244737,775 (3.9)5
It is a time of awakening. In our -fields, hedgerows and woodlands, our beaches, cities and parks, an almost imperceptible shift soon becomes a riot of sound and colour: winter ends, and life surges forth once more. Whether in town or country, we all share in this natural rhythm, in the joy and anticipation of the changing year.; In prose and poetry both old and new, Spring mirrors the unfolding of the season, inviting us to see what's around us with new eyes. Featuring original writing by Rob Cowen, Miriam Darlington and Stephen Moss, classic extracts from the work of George Orwell, Clare Leighton and H. E. Bates, and fresh new voices from across the UK, this is an original and inspiring collection of nature writing that brings the British springtime to life in all its vivid glory.… (más)

Ninguno.

Ninguno
Cargando...

Inscríbete en LibraryThing para averiguar si este libro te gustará.

No hay Conversaciones actualmente sobre este libro.

» Ver también 5 menciones

Mostrando 4 de 4
Spring is that time of year where we shrug off the dark nights and sullen weather and celebrate the light and the warmth of the sun as it floods through the gothic formwork of trees. Plants are waking up too, buds swell and then burst with fresh green leaves, the wanderers return from afar and there is the frantic race to find a mate. Those that have spent the winter gestating, are born, bring new life into the world. It is the season where change is most noticeable and for a lot of people most welcomed.

Harrison has once again drawn together some of the finest new writing from established authors and exciting new ones and scoured the classic texts to gather them in this book. She has selected a good mix of prose and poetry too, each with the essence of the season distilled within. Most exciting are the new authors that are here for the first time in print, people like Jo Sinclair, Alice Hunter, Vijay Medtia, Elliot Dowding and Chris Foster. All have the potential to add to the natural history lexicography.

It is full of the wonders of nature, acute observation of the landscape around and writers celebrating the joy of the season. It is a lovely book too, the stunning foil blocked cover by Lynn Hatzius captures the energy and zest of spring perfectly. For those of you that love your nature writing, this collection is a perfect distillation of the moment. ( )
  PDCRead | Apr 6, 2020 |
The cover of this book is absolutely striking in vibrant tones of green, perfectly evoking thoughts of spring, and I couldn't wait to look inside. It is so full of life with the tweeting of birds, gambolling of lambs, slithering of snakes and not forgetting the escapades of Timothy the tortoise. As the season unfurls throughout each page it epitomises the season of spring with the joy and hope of new beginnings.

There are excerpts from the classics interspersed with modern writing from naturalists and nature writers. One minute you are reading a passage from Jane Eyre or Under Milk Wood and the next you are reading observations of a season unfolding within one day as the writer travels from North to South of our beautiful country.

On some of the older pieces, I was quite surprised to see the date it was written. They certainly didn’t give their age away which is testament to how wonderfully each passage has been selected for inclusion in this book. As an added bonus, it is published in conjunction with The Wildlife Trusts, raising funds for trusts across the UK.

Full of perfectly mixed passages of the wonders of nature, this is a book I will turn to each year as the vivacious season of spring approaches.

I received this book from the publisher, Elliott & Thompson, in exchange for an honest review. ( )
  Michelle.Ryles | Mar 9, 2020 |
‘’It is Spring, moonless night in the small town, starless and bible-black, the cobblestreets silent and the hunched courters’ - and rabbits’ wood limping invisible down to the shoe-black, slow, black, crowblack, fishingboat- bobbing sea. The houses are blind as moles (though moles see fine tonight in the snowting, velvet dingles) or blind as Captain Cat there in the muffled middle by the pump and the town clock, the shops in mourning, the Welfare Hall in widows’ weeds. And all the people of the lulled and dumbfound town are sleeping now.’’

On my way to work I realise that spring is hesitatingly knocking on our door.Even though the changing of the seasons is an abstract notion in Athens, working in the northern suburbs of the capital, far from the city centre, has quite a few perks (if we exclude the fact that taking the Athens Tube and sitting with an unimaginable number of idiots lowers my IQ…) As I watch the tress acquiring life once gain and the days lengthening, I can feel the sweetness in the air and this special weightlessness. Although spring is my least favorite season, the arrival of Easter gives me such joy that I can ignore the allergies and the irritating pollen flying and sticking everywhere. This anthology is my final stop in a beautiful journey curated by Melissa Harrison.

‘’I don’t think any artist, using the subtlest brush strokes and softest of hues, could capture the rich colours and sounds and scents of the evening. Is there a poet who could fit the rhymes and beats and randomness to the rigidity of a sonnet or haiku, even with the cleverest metaphors? No orchestra could mimic the mellow simplicity and the startling complexity of this unrehearsed, yet harmonised soundtrack. The sun has set on this Suffolk spring evening.’’

Toads, swallows, hedgehogs, foxes, bumblebees, deer. Badgers, otters, magpies playing in the woodland while bluebells, mandarins, anemones, unopened buds in the night garden. Travel to some of the most beautiful corners of Great Britain: Cambridgeshire, Buckinghamshire, Hertfordshire, Cumbria, the Highlands, Bodmin Moor, the Yorkshire Dales, Chesil Beach, Oxfordshire, Suffolk. Take a stroll and enjoy the spring evening in the company of beautiful texts and extracts by famous writers and lovers of the flower season.

‘’There is a spiritual feel to the wood tonight that I don’t think I’m imagining. Perhaps it’s expectation, and awe that this recently denuded scene is now bursting into life again. The winds have stopped and our sense of anticipation seems to be shared by nature, waiting with us. A blackbird shrieks an alarm call in front of us, as if to dispel such romantic notions.’’

A beautiful text on the coming of spring in the Highlands by Annie Worsley. Highfield, a beautiful poem by Alan Creedon. A moving text on fatherhood and the bond between the generations accompanied by the sweetness of the birdsong by Rob Cowen. A vivid description of the change of seasons in the North by Elliot Dowding, the thoughts of a teacher on children and baby owls by Nicola Chester and a beautiful confession of the isolation that has now become the companion of every city resident and the change most of us undergo when the opportunity to come closer to nature occurs. A joyous text on the coming of spring in the city by Melissa Harrison and an ode to sakura, the cherry blossom, and the unique relationship between flora and the Japanese culture.

And then we have the greats joining the spring fest. William Shakespeare’s Sonnet 98. An extract from Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte and from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen. Thomas Hardy. The preparations of the Mole for the coming of the season or How to Do Spring-cleaning in The Wind In The Willows way by Kenneth Grahame. Dylan Thomas and a beautiful, haunting text on the silent, hesitant spring nights taken from Under Milk Wood. A dark, atmospheric passage on the death and rebirth of Nature by D.H. Lawrence. And so many more…

I am going to miss the series. The only thing that would make me feel better is to have an anthology dedicated to each month. That would be ideal…

‘’Only you can hear the houses sleeping in the streets in the slow deep salt and silence black, bandaged night. Only you can see, in the blinded bedrooms, the combs and petticoats over the chairs, the jugs and basins, the glasses of teeth, Thou Shalt Not on the wall, and the yellowing dickybird watching pictures of the dead. Only you can hear and see…’’

‘’And the seasons roll through our literature, too, budding, blossoming, fruiting and dying back. Think of it: the lazy summer days and golden harvests, the misty autumn walks and frozen fields in winter and all the hopeful romance of spring.’’

My reviews can also be found on: https://theopinionatedreaderblog.wordpress.com ( )
  AmaliaGavea | Mar 16, 2019 |
Spring is a collection of British non-fiction, poetry, and fiction about springtime. Mostly short nature writing writing for the the volume in 2016, there are also older poems and fiction and non-fiction experts from writers as varied as A. E. Housman and George Orwell. It's fun and really gets you feeling the joy of spring as the coldness of winter gradually fades into flowers and songbirds. If you enjoy nature writing, you may want to pick this up, it's UK-only so those elsewhere will have to use Book Depository or go second-hand. ( )
  inge87 | Mar 18, 2017 |
Mostrando 4 de 4
sin reseñas | añadir una reseña
Debes iniciar sesión para editar los datos de Conocimiento Común.
Para más ayuda, consulta la página de ayuda de Conocimiento Común.
Título canónico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Fecha de publicación original
Personas/Personajes
Lugares importantes
Eventos importantes
Películas relacionadas
Premios y honores
Epígrafe
Dedicatoria
Primeras palabras
Citas
Últimas palabras
Aviso de desambigüedad
Editores
Blurbistas
Idioma original
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
DDC/MDS Canónico

Referencias a esta obra en fuentes externas.

Wikipedia en inglés

Ninguno

It is a time of awakening. In our -fields, hedgerows and woodlands, our beaches, cities and parks, an almost imperceptible shift soon becomes a riot of sound and colour: winter ends, and life surges forth once more. Whether in town or country, we all share in this natural rhythm, in the joy and anticipation of the changing year.; In prose and poetry both old and new, Spring mirrors the unfolding of the season, inviting us to see what's around us with new eyes. Featuring original writing by Rob Cowen, Miriam Darlington and Stephen Moss, classic extracts from the work of George Orwell, Clare Leighton and H. E. Bates, and fresh new voices from across the UK, this is an original and inspiring collection of nature writing that brings the British springtime to life in all its vivid glory.

No se han encontrado descripciones de biblioteca.

Descripción del libro
Resumen Haiku

Enlaces rápidos

Cubiertas populares

Valoración

Promedio: (3.9)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 1
3.5 1
4 2
4.5
5 1

¿Este eres tú?

Conviértete en un Autor de LibraryThing.

 

Acerca de | Contactar | LibraryThing.com | Privacidad/Condiciones | Ayuda/Preguntas frecuentes | Blog | Tienda | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas de Figuras Notables | Primeros Reseñadores | Conocimiento Común | 154,358,711 libros! | Barra superior: Siempre visible