PortadaGruposSe habla deMásVisión actual
Buscar En Este Sitio
Este sitio utiliza cookies para ofrecer nuestros servicios, mejorar el rendimiento, para análisis y (si no está registrado) para publicidad. Al usar LibraryThing reconoces que has leído y comprendido nuestros Términos de Servicio y Política de Privacidad. Su uso del sitio y de los servicios está sujeto a estas políticas y términos.
Hide this

Resultados de Google Books

Pulse en una miniatura para ir a Google Books.

An imaginary life por David Malouf
Cargando...

An imaginary life (original 1978; edición 1999)

por David Malouf

MiembrosReseñasPopularidadValoración promediaMenciones
6521526,829 (3.95)32
In the first century A.D., Publius Ovidius Naso, the most urbane and irreverent poet of imperial Rome, was banished to a remote village on the edge of the Black Sea. From these sparse facts, Malouf has fashioned an audacious and supremely moving novel. Marooned on the edge of the known world, exiled from his native tongue, Ovid depends on the kindness of barbarians who impale their dead and converse with the spirit world.Then he becomes the guardian of a still more savage creature, a feral child who has grown up among deer. What ensues is a luminous encounter between civilization and nature, as enacted by a poet who once cataloged the treacheries of love and a boy who slowly learns how to give it. "A work of unusual intelligence and imagination, full of surprising images and insights...One of those rare books you end up underlining and copying out into notebooks and reading out loud to friends."--The New York Times Book Review… (más)
Miembro:Helenliz
Título:An imaginary life
Autores:David Malouf
Info:London : Vintage, 1999.
Colecciones:Lo he leído pero no lo tengo
Valoración:****
Etiquetas:Read, 2021, Audio

Detalles de la obra

An Imaginary Life por David Malouf (1978)

Cargando...

Inscríbete en LibraryThing para averiguar si este libro te gustará.

No hay Conversaciones actualmente sobre este libro.

» Ver también 32 menciones

Mostrando 1-5 de 15 (siguiente | mostrar todos)
I don't know what I was expecting, but this is quite unusual. It starts out with the poet Ovid, having been exiled from Rome to the edge of the known world finding himself an unwilling guest of a people who don't speak the same language and who exist in a very different environment to that which he is used to. In chapter 1 he is full of self doubt and there is a cry from the heart of the poet asking if any of his work will survive him, if any of his lines will exist, even if in the quotations of others. We know that this is the case, hos work wasn't all destroyed and he has survived many centuries.
Thereafter, he perks up a bit and we start to know more about the people he is living with, he starts to learn their language and to understand them, while remaining an outsider. As he begins to participate in the life of the village, so we learn more about them, but that also sparks memories in him of his earlier life, his childhood as the second son, his brother and his early death, the relationship with his father. We never quite find out what prompted his exile.
And, somewhere along the way, he sees a wild boy, a human child living with the animals on the plain. He wonders how the child survives and determines to bring him back to the world of men. However this too brings a memory, when he was a child himself he seems to have had an invisible companion, and he can;t decide if the child is this invisible companion brought to life. It takes several seasons before the village combines to bring the boy in and Ovid takes over his care. The village remain sceptical and the events of the penultimate chapter, again, bring to the fore the doubt as to what this child actually is. Is he human, is he a devil, or might he be something else entirely?
There's something supernatural about the close, when the narration has changed tone entirely from the first, no longer worrying about his writing or reputation, Ovid ventures out on one more journey and finds his place in the universe, while the spirit and physical worlds remain merged in an inseperable whole.
I really had no idea what to expect of this from the brief synopsis, and I'm not sure how you go about describing it. There's something lyrical about the prose, something indefineable about the mingling of the physical and the imagined and something entirely enchanting about the care expressed by two such alien beings. I listened to this and really enjoyed it. ( )
  Helenliz | Jun 24, 2021 |
This is a beautiful novel about Ovid's years of exile in Tomis on the Black Sea in what is now Romania. Someone who has read Ovid's disparate and pleading poems from this period might expect this book to be equally bleak. Instead, Malouf depicts the poet as someone who reinvents himself through the strange customs of this place at the extreme end of the Roman world.

I understand that some reviewers see this as an allegory of Australian colonization, but for me, it is more universal: a wonderful thing in itself and a splendid meditation on language and exile. ( )
  le.vert.galant | Nov 19, 2019 |
A double allegory

"An Imaginary Life" (1978) is nominally the story of Ovid's exile and death. Ovid wrote two sets of poems from his exile in Tomis (in Pontus, a region of present-day Turkey on the Black Sea, and in Constanta, a Romanian city, also on the Black Sea), called Tristia and Epistulae ex Ponto. Malouf used Tristia for his picture of the nearly barbarian outpost Pontus, but other than that he invented his "imaginary life." It strikes me as a double allegory:

1. It's an allegory of poetry, because Ovid is described as redicovering poetry in Pontus. First he finds it in the people there and their shaman, whose language is not as inflected as Latin (the narrator says this several times), but is more intimately attuned to nature. Then he finds it again in the "Child," a feral child the narrator takes in. The Child can mimic animal sounds, and the narrator realizes that is en even deeper form of poetry, one that depends on empathy. (This is contrasted with the narrator's satiric and hypereloquent poetry.)

2. It's also an allegory of Australia. There are three worlds in the book: Ovid's scintillating life in Rome; his simple, superstitious life in Tomis; and "the last reality," his life in Asia, beyond the Ister (i.e., north of the Danube), with the feral child. I imagine I'm hardly the first one to say this, but Rome is like England, a distant dream of soft overfed, overindulgent people devoid of belief but rich in "dazzling lierary display"; Tomis is like Australia, a wholly new world, surrounded by nature, with only the faintest echoes of culture; and the child (and the Asian grasslands) are like Aborigines, intimately at home in nature, naturally happy, fundamentally Other. The narrator has to cross painfully from Rome to Tomis, but he accepts it and learns its language. Later he crosses joyfully from Tomis to Asia.(If this seems unlikely, consider Malouf's "Remembering Babylon," about a White boy taken in by Aborigines. The England/Australia/Aboriginal triad recurs there.)

The book is naturally about other things as well. In a brief note Malouf says he was interesed in how Ovid might have escaped "skepticisim" and found belief. And it's also a Bildungsroman, with a mystical circle of life built into it. It's a lovely, succinctly imagined, sincere, romantic book.
  JimElkins | Jul 10, 2019 |
1978 novella by the esteemed Australian writer, known especially for his poetry. The imagined life at hand is of Ovid, famed Roman poet who was exiled to Tomis on the Black Sea in A.D. 8, under what circumstances we don't know. The mystery of Ovid's banishment to live among the barbarians ("these Getae") invites Malouf to invent a dreamy first-person narrative for the exile, who describes living in very sparse, frigid conditions with an "old man", the man's mother, and some extended family. Seasonally, Ovid goes along on horseback with other men, "into the birchwoods", to hunt deer. On one excursion, they glimpse an apparent wild-boy. Ovid is captivated by the child's elusive existence, and eventually the men track and roughly capture him. Ovid becomes caretaker for "Child" as he refers to him, gently coaxing him away from wildness, observing him for long periods in which Ovid falls into vague reveries of his own childhood. The shamanic, spirit-imbued world of his barbarian hosts proves a threat to Child when he becomes ill, leading to a fever dream exodus. This work is poetic, at times beautiful, but a bit too gray and nebulous for me. Perhaps a familiarity with Ovid's Metamorphosis cycle, which tells of human transformations into the natural world, would help the reader. ( )
  ThoughtPolice | Apr 23, 2018 |
An interesting short novel that imagines Ovid's exile and death as he searches for a way to a closer understanding of reality. ( )
  nmele | Jan 25, 2016 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 15 (siguiente | mostrar todos)
sin reseñas | añadir una reseña
Debes iniciar sesión para editar los datos de Conocimiento Común.
Para más ayuda, consulta la página de ayuda de Conocimiento Común.
Título canónico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Fecha de publicación original
Personas/Personajes
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Lugares importantes
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Eventos importantes
Películas relacionadas
Premios y honores
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Epígrafe
Dedicatoria
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
To Christopher
Primeras palabras
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
When I first saw the child I cannot say.
Citas
Últimas palabras
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Aviso de desambigüedad
Editores
Blurbistas
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Idioma original
DDC/MDS Canónico

Referencias a esta obra en fuentes externas.

Wikipedia en inglés (1)

In the first century A.D., Publius Ovidius Naso, the most urbane and irreverent poet of imperial Rome, was banished to a remote village on the edge of the Black Sea. From these sparse facts, Malouf has fashioned an audacious and supremely moving novel. Marooned on the edge of the known world, exiled from his native tongue, Ovid depends on the kindness of barbarians who impale their dead and converse with the spirit world.Then he becomes the guardian of a still more savage creature, a feral child who has grown up among deer. What ensues is a luminous encounter between civilization and nature, as enacted by a poet who once cataloged the treacheries of love and a boy who slowly learns how to give it. "A work of unusual intelligence and imagination, full of surprising images and insights...One of those rare books you end up underlining and copying out into notebooks and reading out loud to friends."--The New York Times Book Review

No se han encontrado descripciones de biblioteca.

Descripción del libro
Resumen Haiku

Enlaces rápidos

Cubiertas populares

Valoración

Promedio: (3.95)
0.5
1
1.5
2 5
2.5 1
3 20
3.5 9
4 26
4.5 7
5 28

¿Este eres tú?

Conviértete en un Autor de LibraryThing.

 

Acerca de | Contactar | LibraryThing.com | Privacidad/Condiciones | Ayuda/Preguntas frecuentes | Blog | Tienda | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas de Figuras Notables | Primeros Reseñadores | Conocimiento Común | 160,359,125 libros! | Barra superior: Siempre visible