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Aurora por Kim Stanley Robinson
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Aurora (edición 2015)

por Kim Stanley Robinson (Autor)

MiembrosReseñasPopularidadValoración promediaMenciones
1,2498311,351 (3.74)49
"Generations after leaving earth, a starship draws near to the planet that may serve as a new home world for those on board. But the journey has brought unexpected changes and their best laid plans may not be enough to survive"--
Miembro:bostonwendym
Título:Aurora
Autores:Kim Stanley Robinson (Autor)
Info:Orbit
Colecciones:Read
Valoración:
Etiquetas:Ninguno

Detalles de la obra

Aurora por Kim Stanley Robinson

  1. 10
    Litany of the Long Sun: Nightside the Long Sun and Lake of the Long Sun por Gene Wolfe (LamontCranston)
  2. 10
    Tau Cero por Poul Anderson (harmen)
    harmen: Both have similar events happening, but they are still different stories. Telling how they match would spoil either too much :) (I do think Tau Zero was the better of the two)
  3. 00
    Rito de paso por Alexei Panshin (LamontCranston)
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» Ver también 49 menciones

Mostrando 1-5 de 83 (siguiente | mostrar todos)
A book which I thought had a good premise to start with, but then it goes into a downward spiral it never really comes out from.

This book is about interstellar colonization and its pitfalls. The author has a certain opinion about this issue and he twists plot and characters to serve his philosophy at will. The result is a mass of extra-ordinarily stupid and improbable situations. The requires suspension of disbelief is stretched past the breaking point.

Another major problem of the book is the way the story is told. The book starts off with the PoV of a teenage girl. This is extraordinarily boring and irritating. The PoV then switches to semi-omniscient third person, the narrator being the ship itself. This is quite entertaining and interesting in places as the development of awareness of the ship is something novel to follow. But all too often this narration degenerates into generic third person narration and the unique tone of the ship is lost.

There is no real point in talking about the characters or the technology. Characters are sock-puppetted to serve the author's agenda, and the technology has an astonoshing spectrum from being futuristic to hilariously incompetent. This also serves the authors agenda.

Finally the ending of the book is poorly written, unnecessarily drawn out and the absolute last bit is utterly ridiculous. ( )
  Andorion | Feb 6, 2021 |
An amazing concept, fascinating science, interesting main characters, but it somehow still fell flat for me. In particular, the ending was a letdown. Just OK... ( )
  RandyRasa | Dec 31, 2020 |
That was a wonderful enjoyment to read. Very interesting and intense story for most of the part and includes a lot of interesting what-ifs too.

I would also recommend this for non sci-fi readers as the premises and story parts are really good.

Highly recommended. ( )
  gullevek | Dec 15, 2020 |
3.5/5

The vivid and believable illustration of a possible near future almost makes up for what’s lacking in plot and character development.

Having recently read the Mars trilogy it wouldn’t be fair to expect anything more or less from Kim Stanley Robinson. “Aurora” is a first cousin to the Red/Green/Blue Mars triplet in that they share the same 2Xth century technology give or take a few developments here or there conveniently introduced to drive the plot along.

The characters tell the story in Aurora, not the other way around. Each is set up to provide his/her/its unique perspective on their journey and Robinson seems content to let every character sit happily inside the box in which he/she/it started for the four-hundred-odd pages of this novel. When named characters are removed from the narrative by death or circumstance it is because they’ve outlived their usefulness as plot elements.

Most of the story is narrated by an artificially intelligent quantum computer named Ship as it actively learns to leverage the english language as a summarization device. Perhaps Robinson listened to the critics of his previous novels and found a literary mechanism to state, in no uncertain terms, “don’t mistake this for classic literature.” I enjoyed how this contract with the reader allowed for sometimes brutal, numbers-heavy exposition that helps the reader build a detailed and airtight mental model of their world. Plus, who reading a book like this doesn’t geek out on a novel written around back-of-the-napkin math?

Ship developed the most out of any character in the book by no insignificant margin. Witty at times and candid always, through Ship Robinson explored an intriguing intersection between logic, power, compassion, and duty. An introspective computer’s take on their pilgrimage. Ship turned quickly from a stale and unwelcome trope to the only character in the book that was relatable, or for lack of a better word, human.

Unfortunately, key moments of decision in the plot are swept over in a page or two to make room for seemingly endless passages exploring characters thoughts and feelings. This is not inherently a bad thing, however, much (most?) of this book is whittled away in this fashion without managing to add a single third dimension to a cast of uniformly flat characters (Ship not included). Actors are born, develop, and die as if encased in amber. You can turn the glossy stone over in your hands and examine it from all angles and lighting conditions, still, the caterpillar fossilized within will never metamorphose into a butterfly.

Plot-wise, I found the situation that unfolded in orbit around Tau Ceti to be underdeveloped. The section on Aurora was all about “what”: people start dying and half of the crew wants to go back. As a result there was very little room left to flesh out “why”. A token effort was given towards diagnosing the problem pathogen but as soon as the first settler died of the unknown disease you could feel Robinson readying the reader to abandon the Tau Ceti system altogether.

The subsequent decision to split the team was told from the political perspective only. What were the calculations or emotional motives behind most named characters declaring Aurora and Iris a lost cause? The shift in attitudes was so jarring and thinly justified that I found myself worrying that I had skipped pages or a section. Was Robinson afraid of simply rehashing Red Mars and telling a feel-good settler story? I was dumbfounded by the way the stint in the Tau Ceti system was mumbled over.

Shortcomings aside, Aurora was an enjoyable read because I knew what I was getting into and was ready to sign up for an exposition-only “technical manual” science fiction novel. ( )
  gordonhart | Dec 13, 2020 |
"Generations after leaving earth, a starship draws near to the planet that may serve as a new home world for those on board. But the journey has brought unexpected changes and their best laid plans may not be enough to survive"-- ( )
  jrthebutler | Oct 7, 2020 |
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Kim Stanley Robinsonautor principaltodas las edicionescalculado
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"Generations after leaving earth, a starship draws near to the planet that may serve as a new home world for those on board. But the journey has brought unexpected changes and their best laid plans may not be enough to survive"--

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