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Knitting Yarns: Writers on Knitting por Ann…
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Knitting Yarns: Writers on Knitting (edición 2014)

por Ann Hood (Autor)

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2091198,430 (3.67)5
A collection of essays about the transformative power of knitting from 27 contemporary authors, including Ann Patchett, Barbara Kingsolver, John Dufresne, and Joyce Maynard.
Miembro:mglaser
Título:Knitting Yarns: Writers on Knitting
Autores:Ann Hood (Autor)
Info:W. W. Norton & Company (2014), Edition: 1, 304 pages
Colecciones:Tu biblioteca
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Knitting Yarns: Writers on Knitting por Ann Hood (Editor)

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» Ver también 5 menciones

Mostrando 1-5 de 11 (siguiente | mostrar todos)
In Knitting Yarns, twenty-seven writers share how knitting healed, challenged, or helped them grow. There are twenty-six short stories, one poem, and five original patterns in this book, and I enjoyed almost every single one. They run the gamut from serious to light-hearted, and it's certainly possible to cry while reading one story only to laugh at the next.

My favorites? Sue Grafton's "Teaching a Child to Knit," Elinor Lipman's "I Bought This Pattern Book Last Spring," "The Clothes Make the Dog" by Taylor M. Polites, and "Knitted Goods: Notes from a Nervous Knitter" by Elizabeth Searles.

As a solitary knitter, I felt connected to these writers as I read their various relationships with yarn and needles. I also came away with several quotes that touched me, like this one from Andre Dubus III's "Blood, Root, Knit, Purl": "...I felt joined to all the men and women across cultures down through the ages who'd done something useful with their hands."

In the case of previous generations of women in my family, making things-- whether it be by sewing, crocheting, or knitting-- was often a matter of have to, not want to. But these busy women who cooked, cleaned, washed, ironed, birthed and raised children, and helped their husbands farm the land often found time to make something that's main purpose was purely decorative. They needed something pretty in their lives. Reading the stories in Knitting Yarns reconnected me with my roots and made me feel satisfied with the work of my own hands.

This is a good anthology for those who love to make things, and for those who don't who just might want to know what the fascination is all about. ( )
  cathyskye | Apr 17, 2021 |
This isn't a book, it's a piece of crochet, haphazardly put together from random squares of indifferent colour combinations.

We may take a moral from it: no number of highly qualified birds does a swallow make.

This book has prize-winning and NYT best selling authors coming out of its what's it. But in the end it is that creature to be avoided at all costs, the one to which, ironically, knitting never descends: the crocheted blanket squares. The one everybody's grandmother made and 99% of the time they are a hodgepodge of the consequences of 'waste not, want not' with no concern whatsoever for the general notion of aesthetics or any particular person's sensibilities. Uggggh.

I cringed every time I read one of these writers talk about how amazingly impossible it is to knit and how they took twenty years, or isolation with their grandmother or some other extreme measure to learn - that's those who succeeded. Quite a few of them took up astro physics or open heart surgery instead because you know. Knitting is SO HARD.

It's not that I don't want to sympathise. I can look back to my first knitting day, my complete frustration because I couldn't figure out for myself how to do purl, this being just pre-internet - that is, there is no longer any excuse. But Simon showed me how and Simon hadn't even knitted before, he'd simply watched women knit 50 years earlier when he was a young boy and remembered. With all due respect to Simon, this means knitting is NOT THAT HARD.

Like most things in life, becoming a wonderfully accomplished practitioner is hard, but becoming competent is SO NOT HARD.

I couldn't do it. I couldn't sympathise with women talking about how it took them hours and hours and hours and years and generations to learn how to wind a bit of string over a stick. It's a time for embarrassment, not sympathy.

I wanted to sympathise with the writer who ended up giving somebody something that was complete shit, suddenly in the zen of the notion that it's THE THOUGHT THAT COUNTS. But I can't. If that's the thought: I've given you something perfect and you give me in return something shit, I get the thought and it isn't pretty. It's insulting. My friends reading this please take note. I never want to get a lousy meal in return for a good one, a lousy scarf in return for a beautiful one, a crap book in return for a magnificent work of art. Please give me nothing. I will take the message that you care. Not as much as if you'd given me something lovely, but more than if you'd given me something crappy. IMPORTANT NOTE: anybody reading this who is under the age of six is excluded from the above principle.

Rest here:

https://alittleteaalittlechat.wordpress.com/2015/03/18/knitting-yarns-writers-on... ( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |
This isn't a book, it's a piece of crochet, haphazardly put together from random squares of indifferent colour combinations.

We may take a moral from it: no number of highly qualified birds does a swallow make.

This book has prize-winning and NYT best selling authors coming out of its what's it. But in the end it is that creature to be avoided at all costs, the one to which, ironically, knitting never descends: the crocheted blanket squares. The one everybody's grandmother made and 99% of the time they are a hodgepodge of the consequences of 'waste not, want not' with no concern whatsoever for the general notion of aesthetics or any particular person's sensibilities. Uggggh.

I cringed every time I read one of these writers talk about how amazingly impossible it is to knit and how they took twenty years, or isolation with their grandmother or some other extreme measure to learn - that's those who succeeded. Quite a few of them took up astro physics or open heart surgery instead because you know. Knitting is SO HARD.

It's not that I don't want to sympathise. I can look back to my first knitting day, my complete frustration because I couldn't figure out for myself how to do purl, this being just pre-internet - that is, there is no longer any excuse. But Simon showed me how and Simon hadn't even knitted before, he'd simply watched women knit 50 years earlier when he was a young boy and remembered. With all due respect to Simon, this means knitting is NOT THAT HARD.

Like most things in life, becoming a wonderfully accomplished practitioner is hard, but becoming competent is SO NOT HARD.

I couldn't do it. I couldn't sympathise with women talking about how it took them hours and hours and hours and years and generations to learn how to wind a bit of string over a stick. It's a time for embarrassment, not sympathy.

I wanted to sympathise with the writer who ended up giving somebody something that was complete shit, suddenly in the zen of the notion that it's THE THOUGHT THAT COUNTS. But I can't. If that's the thought: I've given you something perfect and you give me in return something shit, I get the thought and it isn't pretty. It's insulting. My friends reading this please take note. I never want to get a lousy meal in return for a good one, a lousy scarf in return for a beautiful one, a crap book in return for a magnificent work of art. Please give me nothing. I will take the message that you care. Not as much as if you'd given me something lovely, but more than if you'd given me something crappy. IMPORTANT NOTE: anybody reading this who is under the age of six is excluded from the above principle.

Rest here:

https://alittleteaalittlechat.wordpress.com/2015/03/18/knitting-yarns-writers-on... ( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |
I enjoyed this, but there should be pictures of the patterns in the book. The website listed no longer exists. ( )
  MarthaJeanne | Aug 30, 2018 |
This is a heartwarming, poignant, and sometimes humorous collection of essays on knitting by authors who knit. There are stories on the every growing yarn stash, why they knit, unfinished projects, who they knit for, teaching grandchildren to knit, knitting to heal a grieving heart, and yes, even an essay on why an author knits for his Chihuahua. I enjoyed some stories more than others, but overall I enjoyed the book very much. It made me want to pick up my needles and listen as I knit.

I listened to the audio but if I had known there were knitting patterns included I would have bought the book instead.
( )
  janb37 | Feb 13, 2017 |
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» Añade otros autores (2 posible)

Nombre del autorRolTipo de autor¿Trabajo?Estado
Hood, AnnEditorautor principaltodas las edicionesconfirmado
Berg, ElizabethContribuidorautor secundariotodas las edicionesconfirmado
Bingham, HelenContribuidorautor secundariotodas las edicionesconfirmado
Dubus III, AndreContribuidorautor secundariotodas las edicionesconfirmado
Dufresne, JohnContribuidorautor secundariotodas las edicionesconfirmado
Grafton, SueContribuidorautor secundariotodas las edicionesconfirmado
Jones, KaylieContribuidorautor secundariotodas las edicionesconfirmado
Kingsolver, BarbaraContribuidorautor secundariotodas las edicionesconfirmado
Maynard, JoyceContribuidorautor secundariotodas las edicionesconfirmado
Patchett, AnnContribuidorautor secundariotodas las edicionesconfirmado
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A collection of essays about the transformative power of knitting from 27 contemporary authors, including Ann Patchett, Barbara Kingsolver, John Dufresne, and Joyce Maynard.

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