PortadaGruposCharlasExplorarPanorama actual
Buscar en el sitio
Este sitio utiliza cookies para ofrecer nuestros servicios, mejorar el rendimiento, análisis y (si no estás registrado) publicidad. Al usar LibraryThing reconoces que has leído y comprendido nuestros Términos de Servicio y Política de Privacidad. El uso del sitio y de los servicios está sujeto a estas políticas y términos.
Hide this

Resultados de Google Books

Pulse en una miniatura para ir a Google Books.

Cargando...

George Washington : Writings

por George Washington

MiembrosReseñasPopularidadValoración promediaConversaciones
558135,704 (4.02)Ninguno
For two centuries, George Washington has stood "first in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen," universally acknowledged as the one indispensable founder of the American republic. This Library of America volume--the most extensive and authoritative one-volume collection ever published--covers five decades of Washington's astonishingly active life and brings together over 440 letters, orders, addresses, and other writings. Among the early writings included are the journal Washington kept at age sixteen while surveying the Shenandoah Valley frontier and the dramatic account of the winter journey he made through the Pennsylvania wilderness in 1753 while on a diplomatic mission. Some two dozen letters written during the French and Indian War, including first-hand accounts of the controversial forest skirmish that sparked those hostilities and of Braddock's bloody defeat, record Washington's early encounters with the harsh challenges of military command. An extensive selection of letters, orders, and addresses from the Revolutionary War make manifest Washington's determined leadership of the Continental Army through the years of defeat and deprivation. Included are accounts of battles; letters to Congress and state governments vividly describing the army's desperate need of supplies; Washington's journal of the victorious Yorktown campaign; and letters and addresses showing how Washington upheld the supremacy of civil power in the new republic by peaceably disbanding the army at the end of the war. Letters from the Confederation period (1783-1789) show Washington's pleasure at returning to his Mount Vernon home, his continued interest in Western land speculation and river navigation, his growing concern with the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation, and his role in the framing and ratification of the Constitution. The writings from his two terms as President of the United States show how Washington strove to establish enduring republican institutions, to build public trust in the new government, to avoid the divisions of party and faction, and to maintain American neutrality during the war between Britain and Revolutionary France. Also included in the volume are letters revealing his close and careful management of Mount Vernon and his evolving attitudes toward slavery. Washington's writings demonstrate the keen, practical intelligence that distinguished his leadership in war and peace, as well as the patriotism, dignity, and devotion to the cause of republican government that won the admiration and trust of his contemporaries and his heirs. LIBRARY OF AMERICA is an independent nonprofit cultural organization founded in 1979 to preserve our nation's literary heritage by publishing, and keeping permanently in print, America's best and most significant writing. The Library of America series includes more than 300 volumes to date, authoritative editions that average 1,000 pages in length, feature cloth covers, sewn bindings, and ribbon markers, and are printed on premium acid-free paper that will last for centuries.… (más)
  1. 00
    The Glorious Cause: The American Revolution, 1763-1789 por Robert Middlekauff (wildbill)
    wildbill: Connect his writings with the events in his life with this volume of the Oxford History of the United States
Ninguno
Cargando...

Inscríbete en LibraryThing para averiguar si este libro te gustará.

No hay Conversaciones actualmente sobre este libro.

Incredible, illuminating. I have never read a work more important, for giving context to the Revolutionary era. In several of his letters George Washington mentions his concern about preserving his papers, which he guessed would be important to later generations, and that was one of many things this man was absolutely prescient about. ( )
  ErinCSmith | Jul 24, 2020 |
sin reseñas | añadir una reseña

Pertenece a las series del editor

Debes iniciar sesión para editar los datos de Conocimiento Común.
Para más ayuda, consulta la página de ayuda de Conocimiento Común.
Título canónico
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Fecha de publicación original
Personas/Personajes
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Lugares importantes
Eventos importantes
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Películas relacionadas
Premios y honores
Epígrafe
Dedicatoria
Primeras palabras
Citas
Últimas palabras
Aviso de desambigüedad
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
This is an omnibus unique to the Library of America; therefore, all CK facts apply to this publication only.
Editores
Información del conocimiento común inglés. Edita para encontrar en tu idioma.
Blurbistas
Idioma original
DDC/MDS Canónico
LCC canónico

Referencias a esta obra en fuentes externas.

Wikipedia en inglés (2)

For two centuries, George Washington has stood "first in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen," universally acknowledged as the one indispensable founder of the American republic. This Library of America volume--the most extensive and authoritative one-volume collection ever published--covers five decades of Washington's astonishingly active life and brings together over 440 letters, orders, addresses, and other writings. Among the early writings included are the journal Washington kept at age sixteen while surveying the Shenandoah Valley frontier and the dramatic account of the winter journey he made through the Pennsylvania wilderness in 1753 while on a diplomatic mission. Some two dozen letters written during the French and Indian War, including first-hand accounts of the controversial forest skirmish that sparked those hostilities and of Braddock's bloody defeat, record Washington's early encounters with the harsh challenges of military command. An extensive selection of letters, orders, and addresses from the Revolutionary War make manifest Washington's determined leadership of the Continental Army through the years of defeat and deprivation. Included are accounts of battles; letters to Congress and state governments vividly describing the army's desperate need of supplies; Washington's journal of the victorious Yorktown campaign; and letters and addresses showing how Washington upheld the supremacy of civil power in the new republic by peaceably disbanding the army at the end of the war. Letters from the Confederation period (1783-1789) show Washington's pleasure at returning to his Mount Vernon home, his continued interest in Western land speculation and river navigation, his growing concern with the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation, and his role in the framing and ratification of the Constitution. The writings from his two terms as President of the United States show how Washington strove to establish enduring republican institutions, to build public trust in the new government, to avoid the divisions of party and faction, and to maintain American neutrality during the war between Britain and Revolutionary France. Also included in the volume are letters revealing his close and careful management of Mount Vernon and his evolving attitudes toward slavery. Washington's writings demonstrate the keen, practical intelligence that distinguished his leadership in war and peace, as well as the patriotism, dignity, and devotion to the cause of republican government that won the admiration and trust of his contemporaries and his heirs. LIBRARY OF AMERICA is an independent nonprofit cultural organization founded in 1979 to preserve our nation's literary heritage by publishing, and keeping permanently in print, America's best and most significant writing. The Library of America series includes more than 300 volumes to date, authoritative editions that average 1,000 pages in length, feature cloth covers, sewn bindings, and ribbon markers, and are printed on premium acid-free paper that will last for centuries.

No se han encontrado descripciones de biblioteca.

Descripción del libro
Resumen Haiku

Biblioteca heredada: George Washington

George Washington tiene una Biblioteca Legada. Las Bibliotecas Legadas son bibliotecas personales de lectores famosos, han sido compilados por miembros de Librarything pertenecientes als grupo Bibliotecas Legadas.

Ver el perfil del legado de George Washington.

Ver la página de autor de George Washington.

Enlaces rápidos

Valoración

Promedio: (4.02)
0.5 1
1 1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 2
3.5
4 9
4.5
5 11

 

Acerca de | Contactar | LibraryThing.com | Privacidad/Condiciones | Ayuda/Preguntas frecuentes | Blog | Tienda | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas heredadas | Primeros Reseñadores | De conocimiento común | 173,797,262 libros! | Barra superior: Siempre visible