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Frankenstein: The 1818 Text (Penguin…
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Frankenstein: The 1818 Text (Penguin Classics) (1818 original; edición 2018)

por Mary Shelley (Autor), Charlotte Gordon (Introducción), Charlotte Gordon (Contribuidor), Charles E. Robinson (Contribuidor)

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2,762534,504 (3.97)19
This new edition of Mary Shelley's classic novel uses the 1818 text, which is a mocking expose of leaders and achievers who leave desolation in their wake, showing mankind its choice - to live co-operatively or to die of selfishness. It is also a black comedy, and harder and wittier than the1831 version with which we are more familiar.Drawing on new research, Marilyn Butler examines the novel in the context of the radical sciences, which were developing among much controversy in the years following the Napoleonic Wars, and shows how Frankenstein's experiment relates to a contemporary debate between the champions of materialistscience and of received religion.… (más)
Miembro:bellaterrabooks
Título:Frankenstein: The 1818 Text (Penguin Classics)
Autores:Mary Shelley (Autor)
Otros autores:Charlotte Gordon (Introducción), Charlotte Gordon (Contribuidor), Charles E. Robinson (Contribuidor)
Información:Penguin Classics (2018), 288 pages
Colecciones:Tu biblioteca
Valoración:
Etiquetas:Ninguno

Información de la obra

Frankenstein or The Modern Prometheus: The 1818 Text por Mary Shelley (1818)

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» Ver también 19 menciones

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Audiobook read by BJ Harrison ( )
  jammymammu | Jan 6, 2023 |
the philosophical issues this book brings up are so, so interesting. the writing is a little hard for me, and i was really surprised to find that in spite of all the unavoidable references to this work, that i really knew next to nothing about it. so the entire story unfolded in a surprising way to me. virtually all of the story was unexpected in both plot and execution.

i don't tend to like the framing of the story as being told to/by someone else thing that is so common in or around this time period, and i didn't appreciate it here either. i also was unimpressed with the details of the story itself, and had to put nearly all of it aside in the reading. because it's the questions the story brings up are what's interesting:

what do we owe to our children? what are we obligated to give or do for our children or other creatures/creations/thought processes that we put into the world? is there an unspoken contract that everything we make/do/create is our responsibility, is something we guarantee our time and thought and love? if so, for how long are we tied to it? can we outgrow it? can we turn our back on it once it can fend for itself? where is the line?

i also feel like, while shelley, for her time, was pretty radical and very feminist, that i'd be really interested in what she'd think today. it seems like her point is at least partly that of course this creation turned out the way he did, because he wasn't given the love and attention that his creator was obligated to give. but reading it, it felt like the creature was a modern day incel or about-to-be-shooter, complaining that he was so full of love and the need for acceptance in society and that when he didn't get it, that he would go on a killing rampage. a very anti-feminist view to say that men who want women's affection deserve it just because they desire it.

super interesting philosophically to consider what she meant, what the time was, how it might be different now. i feel like this is something i'll be thinking about for a long, long time.

from the introduction:
"...[Frankenstein] was at fault because he did not provide his creation with love or an education. Monsters, says Mary, are of our own making."

"Learn from me, if not by my precepts, at least by my example, how dangerous is the acquirement of knowledge, and how much happier that man is who believes his native town to be the world, than he who aspires to become greater than his nature will allow."

"'You are my creator, but I am your master...'"

"'Shall each man,' cried he, 'find a wife for his bosom, and each beast have his mate, and I be alone? I had feelings of affection, and they were requited by detestation and scorn. Man, you may hate; but beware! Your hours will pass in dread and misery, and soon the bolt will fall which must ravish from you your happiness forever. Are you to be happy, while I grovel in the intensity of my wretchedness? '" ( )
  overlycriticalelisa | Dec 9, 2022 |
For whom do I have sympathy? Dr Frankenstein or his monster? I‘m not sure I would have been sympathetic to the monster but for Dan Steven‘s‘ brilliant rendition of him! I admit to being bored until the monster told his story, then, wow! This is a book worth studying. It reads like it was written in 1818, and I‘d rather it “show” rather than “tell.” But there‘s a reason for that I discovered at the end. I‘m so glad I finally read it. ( )
  KarenMonsen | Dec 5, 2022 |
Horror masterwork even 200 years later and one of my favorite stories of all time. The theming is impeccable and the main star of the show. Effortlessly weaving the ideas of the beauty of nature/the benefits of beauty, the dangers of knowledge, loss of innocence, the danger of ambition and the necessity of human connection throughout the whole story. All back ended with religious undertones. It sports two of the best characters in Victor Frankenstein and the Monster as well and is just beautifully tragic. ( )
  CrazyKlownMan | Nov 8, 2022 |
This book is about an unnamed creature and his overly emotional dad who prefers vacations over spending time with his son.

It uses romanticism to describe locations from all over Europe, the characters take away a lot of value from them, there are locations to which the author has been. The book makes the reader think about what influenced the characters to act the way they do because characters reflect on themselves a lot. The main characters are deeply flawed and aren't afraid to show feminine sides of themselves, it's a good exercise in empathy.

There are themes of science and nature, idleness and action present.

It is a very melodramatic, slow-paced read. Sometimes it is very engaging and a breeze to read, sometimes the reader wants more to happen because of wordiness and repetitiveness. A character lamenting their misery for ages is what you should expect here, that being both good and bad. ( )
  NotaRein | Jul 25, 2022 |
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» Añade otros autores (11 posibles)

Nombre del autorRolTipo de autor¿Obra?Estado
Mary Shelleyautor principaltodas las edicionescalculado
Moser, BarryIlustradorautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
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To Mrs. Saville, England

ST. PETERSBURGH, Dec. 11, 17--.

You will rejoice to hear that no disaster has accompanied the commencement of an enterprise which you have regarded with such evil forebodings.
Citas
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This new edition of Mary Shelley's classic novel uses the 1818 text, which is a mocking expose of leaders and achievers who leave desolation in their wake, showing mankind its choice - to live co-operatively or to die of selfishness. It is also a black comedy, and harder and wittier than the1831 version with which we are more familiar.Drawing on new research, Marilyn Butler examines the novel in the context of the radical sciences, which were developing among much controversy in the years following the Napoleonic Wars, and shows how Frankenstein's experiment relates to a contemporary debate between the champions of materialistscience and of received religion.

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