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Una y otra vez (2013)

por Kate Atkinson

Otros autores: Ver la sección otros autores.

Series: Todd Family (1)

MiembrosReseñasPopularidadValoración promediaConversaciones / Menciones
7,1165471,004 (3.97)2 / 929
On a cold and snowy night in 1910, Ursula Todd is born to an English banker and his wife. She dies before she can draw her first breath. On that same cold and snowy night, Ursula Todd is born, and lets out a lusty wail. As she grows, she also dies, repeatedly, in a variety of ways, while the young century marches on towards its second cataclysmic world war. Does Ursula's apparently infinite number of lives give her the power to save the world from its inevitable destiny?… (más)
  1. 267
    La mujer del viajero en el tiempo por Audrey Niffenegger (Yells, BookshelfMonstrosity)
    BookshelfMonstrosity: These moving and thought-provoking novels portray characters whose lives are continually disrupted by time shifts -- in Life after Life, the protagonist repeatedly dies and comes back to life, while in The Time Traveler's Wife, the protagonist time-travels involuntarily.… (más)
  2. 100
    Volver a empezar por Ken Grimwood (fspyck, BookshelfMonstrosity)
    BookshelfMonstrosity: Life after Life and Replay feature characters who live multiple lives against their wills; the complications of dying and coming back to life form the core of each novel and create moving, sometimes funny, always thought-provoking situations.… (más)
  3. 114
    Expedientes por Kate Atkinson (JenMDB)
  4. 61
    El atlas de las nubes por David Mitchell (sturlington)
    sturlington: Both have unusual narrative structures and explore the theme of reincarnation.
  5. 40
    A God in Ruins por Kate Atkinson (Laura400)
  6. 20
    Ronda nocturna por Sarah Waters (rstaedter)
    rstaedter: A different concept, but nonetheless also brilliantly written and with the Blitz as backdrop.
  7. 20
    The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August por Claire North (fairyfeller, pan0ramix)
    fairyfeller: Explores the same concept of one person living the same over and over.
  8. 20
    Station Eleven por Emily St. John Mandel (sturlington)
    sturlington: These are both interesting contemporary works of speculative fiction that play with time and structure.
  9. 31
    El mundo después del cumpleaños por Lionel Shriver (amysisson)
    amysisson: Both books examine decisions and moments that change the course of a life.
  10. 10
    El Efecto del aleteo de una mariposa en Japón por Ruth Ozeki (bibliothequaire)
  11. 21
    Nombre en clave: Verity por Elizabeth Wein (amysisson)
    amysisson: Both are about the unusual ways in which women may impact the tides of war
  12. 00
    Recursion por Blake Crouch (rstaedter)
    rstaedter: Any explanation would be a spoiler for Crouch's novel.
  13. 11
    Juegos de interior por Kate Atkinson (shaunie, KayCliff)
  14. 44
    El Apagón por Connie Willis (VenusofUrbino)
  15. 00
    El libro de los niños por A. S. Byatt (kiwiflowa)
  16. 00
    Secrets of a Charmed Life por Susan Meissner (Usuario anónimo)
    Usuario anónimo: Similar time in history. A story of 2 sisters during the Second World War.
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Inglés (539)  Holandés (2)  Italiano (2)  Alemán (1)  Finlandés (1)  Noruego (1)  Francés (1)  Todos los idiomas (547)
Mostrando 1-5 de 547 (siguiente | mostrar todos)
I am still going back and forth on this book, even after book club. I see both arguments: that it was masterful and that it was overbearing. I'm leaning towards I liked because it did affect my emotional state and thats rare for a book to do given that I have the emotional range of a teaspoon. ( )
  LeBleuUn | Nov 14, 2021 |
First in a Terrific Family Saga

Probably the first thoughts sentient humankind had (that is, after satisfying the need for safety, food, and sex) were the most basic and unknowable: who am I; where am I; and what is here, anyway? From these grew systems of finding answers, some simple, some impossibly complicated, some controlling and restrictive, and some empirical; but all falling short of answering the primal questions of our ancestors. Lumped together, we call these metaphysics. When you add some sharp dialogue, you can call it droll metaphysics. Which is to say that while you travel along with Atkinson's characters, in particular Ursula, you can smile and laugh during the journey.

In Atkinson's tale, life, at least for Ursula, is endless. She's born. Something happens very soon or much later, such as strangulation by her umbilical cord or being blow up in the London blitz. Back she comes for another go. With each resurrection, however, she gains a stronger sense she's been there and done that, strong enough to impel her to make course corrections resulting in different outcomes. All the while she remembers quotes from authors she's read, the likes of Donne, Shakespeare, Nietzsche, and others, as well as Buddhist precepts introduced to her by Dr. Kellet, to whom her mother takes her for help with her odd pronouncements. Life becomes a bit less baffling and painful when she acts on her instincts.

If you're a sci-fi fan interested in time travel books or a devotee of mystical thinking, this probably isn't the novel for you. It probably is for you if you like thinking about the meaning of life and the various possibilities of changing events with small tweaks here and there. It's especially for you if you enjoy very droll writing, which Atkinson produces well and in reams. And if you enjoy getting inside historical events, viewing them through a close-up lens, you'll definitely appreciate Atkinson's treatments of the London blitz, the Berlin bombings, daily life at the Berghof, impressions of Eva Braun and Hitler, life among the Nazi youth—everything nicely rendered and always fascinating.

Most of all, though, whatever your taste, you'll enjoy Atkinson's writing, especially her domestic dialogue, and her characters. Of note are the parents Hugh and Sylvie, the iconoclastic aunt Izzie, and, of course, Ursula, whose mind can wander strangely or defensively. As an example, in one of her lifetimes, an American college boy rapes in her own home (with dire fallout following later). After he charged off in high spirits to join her brother, she "was left to stare at the floral wallpaper. She had never noticed before that the flowers were wisteria, the same flower that grew on the arch over the back porch. This must be what in literature was referred to as 'deflowering,' she thought. It had always sounded like a rather pretty word."

Finally, while the book begins with a very dramatic, very history-altering event, Atkinson never follows up on it. We come to understand why Ursula does it but we are left in the end to contemplate the consequences for ourselves. Which you might suppose appeals to the metaphysician in us and testifies to the possibilities of infinite timelines. ( )
  write-review | Nov 4, 2021 |
First in a Terrific Family Saga

Probably the first thoughts sentient humankind had (that is, after satisfying the need for safety, food, and sex) were the most basic and unknowable: who am I; where am I; and what is here, anyway? From these grew systems of finding answers, some simple, some impossibly complicated, some controlling and restrictive, and some empirical; but all falling short of answering the primal questions of our ancestors. Lumped together, we call these metaphysics. When you add some sharp dialogue, you can call it droll metaphysics. Which is to say that while you travel along with Atkinson's characters, in particular Ursula, you can smile and laugh during the journey.

In Atkinson's tale, life, at least for Ursula, is endless. She's born. Something happens very soon or much later, such as strangulation by her umbilical cord or being blow up in the London blitz. Back she comes for another go. With each resurrection, however, she gains a stronger sense she's been there and done that, strong enough to impel her to make course corrections resulting in different outcomes. All the while she remembers quotes from authors she's read, the likes of Donne, Shakespeare, Nietzsche, and others, as well as Buddhist precepts introduced to her by Dr. Kellet, to whom her mother takes her for help with her odd pronouncements. Life becomes a bit less baffling and painful when she acts on her instincts.

If you're a sci-fi fan interested in time travel books or a devotee of mystical thinking, this probably isn't the novel for you. It probably is for you if you like thinking about the meaning of life and the various possibilities of changing events with small tweaks here and there. It's especially for you if you enjoy very droll writing, which Atkinson produces well and in reams. And if you enjoy getting inside historical events, viewing them through a close-up lens, you'll definitely appreciate Atkinson's treatments of the London blitz, the Berlin bombings, daily life at the Berghof, impressions of Eva Braun and Hitler, life among the Nazi youth—everything nicely rendered and always fascinating.

Most of all, though, whatever your taste, you'll enjoy Atkinson's writing, especially her domestic dialogue, and her characters. Of note are the parents Hugh and Sylvie, the iconoclastic aunt Izzie, and, of course, Ursula, whose mind can wander strangely or defensively. As an example, in one of her lifetimes, an American college boy rapes in her own home (with dire fallout following later). After he charged off in high spirits to join her brother, she "was left to stare at the floral wallpaper. She had never noticed before that the flowers were wisteria, the same flower that grew on the arch over the back porch. This must be what in literature was referred to as 'deflowering,' she thought. It had always sounded like a rather pretty word."

Finally, while the book begins with a very dramatic, very history-altering event, Atkinson never follows up on it. We come to understand why Ursula does it but we are left in the end to contemplate the consequences for ourselves. Which you might suppose appeals to the metaphysician in us and testifies to the possibilities of infinite timelines. ( )
  write-review | Nov 4, 2021 |
One of my favorite sci fi genres is alternate history and I love a good summer beach read. Combine those and you get Kate Atkinson's novel Life After Life. What a fantastic literary exercise for the author--what if your protagonist has the chance to live her life over and over again, correcting mistakes? You could write a novel where suspense for your readers is trying to determine at what moment she'll die again. You would have the opportunity to explore not only the protagonist but also the side characters and their motives and drives over and over again. And you can alter history--or the outcome of history.

( )
  auldhouse | Sep 30, 2021 |
Kate Atkinson's Life After Life is a wonderful, wonderful novel, and I absolutely loved it. Ursula is the third child of Sylvie and Hugh, born just before WW1, and this is the story of her many lives. Not reincarnation, not time travel (although the book's structure is time-hopping all over the place), but deja vu taken to the extreme, where she gets the chance to live bits of her life over again with different outcomes. It's very cleverly done - Ursula doesn't necessarily know what awful thing is going to happen, but the deja vu feeling means that she does *something* to change the outcome of what could have happened (and did, in another parallel life). There are a lot of difficult events - war, rape, backstreet abortion, Nazism, teenage pregnancy, murder, suicide, domestic violence, amongst others - and poor Bridget, the family maid, has a particularly hard time as Ursula tries several times to stop her from catching the Spanish flu at the end of WW1 and infecting the household. In some lives Ursula is a mother, in others she is a maiden aunt with a history, in some she lives in Nazi Germany, in others she is in London, but throughout, each timeline is believable even as you know you're suspending disbelief. I'll definitely be picking up her related novel, A God in Ruins (primarily about Ursula's brother Teddy - thank goodness it's not about her brother Maurice!), in the next few months before the characters start to fade in my mind. ( )
2 vota Jackie_K | Sep 26, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 547 (siguiente | mostrar todos)
I absolutley loved Life After Life. It's so brilliant and existential, and I really responded to all of the 'what ifs' and 'if onlys' that she plays with.
añadido por Sylak | editarStylist [Issue 338], Emily Blunt (Oct 12, 2016)
 
Atkinson’s juggling a lot at once — and nimbly succeeds in keeping the novel from becoming confusing.
 
For the other extraordinary thing is that, despite the horrors, this is a warm and humane book. This is partly because the felt sense of life is so powerful and immediate. Whatever the setting, it has been thoroughly imagined. Most of the characters are agreeable. They speak well and often wittily. When, like Ursula’s eldest brother, Maurice, they are not likeable, they are treated in the spirit of comedy. The humour is rich. Once you have adapted yourself to the novel’s daring structure and accepted its premise that life is full of unexplored possibilities, the individual passages offer a succession of delights. A family saga? Yes, but a wonderful and rewarding variation on a familiar form.
 
This is, without doubt, Atkinson’s best novel since her prizewinning debut, Behind the Scenes at the Museum, and a serious step forwards to realising her ambition to write a contemporary version of Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. A ferociously clever writer, she has recast her interest in mothers and daughters and the seemingly unimportant, quotidian details of life to produce a big, bold novel that is enthralling, entertaining and experimental. It is not perfect – the second half of the book, for example, could have done with one less dead end – but I would be astonished if it does not carry off at least one major prize.
 
Aficionados of Kate Atkinson's novels – this is the eighth – will tell you that she writes two sorts: the "literary" kind, exemplified by her Whitbread Prize-winning debut Behind the Scenes at the Museum, and the Jackson Brodie crime thrillers. In reality, the distinction is superfluous. Atkinson is a literary writer who likes experimenting with different forms, and her books appeal to a huge audience, full stop. However, for those still keen on these discriminations, Life After Life is one of the "literary" ones. As with the Brodies, Atkinson steers with a light touch, despite the grimness of the subject matter...The novels of Kate Atkinson habitually shuffle past and present, but Life After Life takes the shuffling to such extremes that the reader has to hold on to his hat. It's more than a storytelling device. Ursula and her therapist discuss theories of time. He tells her that it is circular, but she claims that it's a palimpsest. The writer has a further purpose. Elsewhere, Atkinson is quoted as saying: "I'm very interested in the moral path, doing the right thing." It's impossible not to be sympathetic toward Ursula, who yearns to save the people she loves and has been blessed – or cursed – with the ability to do it.
 

» Añade otros autores (2 posible)

Nombre del autorRolTipo de autor¿Trabajo?Estado
Kate Atkinsonautor principaltodas las edicionescalculado
Woolgar, FenellaNarradorautor secundarioalgunas edicionesconfirmado
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What if some day or night a demon were to steal you after you into your loneliest loneliness and say to you:'This life as you now live and have lived it, you will have to live once more and innumerable times more"...Would you not throw yourself down and gnash your teeth and curse the demon who spoke thus? Or have you once experienced a tremendous moment when you would have answered him:"You are a god and never have I heard anything so divine.'

Nietzsche, The Gay Science
Everything changes and nothing remains still.

Plato, Cratylus
Dedicatoria
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For Elissa
Primeras palabras
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A fug of tobacco smoke and damp clammy air hit her as she entered the café.
Citas
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"It's as if," he said to Ursula, "you walk into a room and your life ends but you keep on living."
"All those names," Teddy said, gazing at the Cenotaph. "All those lives. And now again. I think there is something wrong with the human race. It undermines everything one would like to believe in, don't you think?"

"No point in thinking," she said briskly, "you just have to get on with life." (She really was turning into Miss Woolf.) "We only have one after all, we should try and do our best. We can never get it right, but we must try." (The transformation was complete.)

"What if we had a chance to do it again and again," Teddy said, "until we finally did get it right? Wouldn't that be wonderful?"
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Ninguno

On a cold and snowy night in 1910, Ursula Todd is born to an English banker and his wife. She dies before she can draw her first breath. On that same cold and snowy night, Ursula Todd is born, and lets out a lusty wail. As she grows, she also dies, repeatedly, in a variety of ways, while the young century marches on towards its second cataclysmic world war. Does Ursula's apparently infinite number of lives give her the power to save the world from its inevitable destiny?

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