Founding-era readings supporting what became the Fourth Amendment exclusionary rule

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Founding-era readings supporting what became the Fourth Amendment exclusionary rule

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1RogerRoots
Sep 16, 2009, 9:32pm

To clarify my earlier post: I am specifically looking at the libraries of Founding-Era lawyers and judges (or, better yet, true "Framers" who participated in the 1785-1791 debates) for evidence of their thoughts or readings on search-and-seizure law. I am particularly interested in two titles: Hargrave's "Complete collection of State Trials" (4th ed. 1776-81) and a pamphlet that was printed in several editions in the 1760s sometimes entitled "A Letter Concerning Libels . . ." by "Father of Candor." If either of these works were in the possession of any of the Founding Luminaries, i am interested in knowing this. i have been going around to rare book libraries trying to determine the provenance of these books in their collections and cross-indexing this information with records of the Constitution's debates. Can anyone help me out with suggestions?

--Roger Roots

2jbd1
Sep 16, 2009, 9:49pm

Have you looked in the Libraries of Early America that are cataloged in LT? While this isn't a full list (yet), it's a pretty decent sample.

3RogerRoots
Sep 24, 2009, 6:12pm

Thanks. I checked it out and came up with some good ideas. By the way I may be in Boston tomorrow (Sept. 25) and might stop at MHS to look up a book.

--Roger Roots

4jbd1
Sep 24, 2009, 6:17pm

Very good - make sure if you do come to ask for me, I'll be happy to speak with you.

5jbd1
Sep 24, 2009, 6:18pm

Very good - make sure if you do drop by the library to ask for me, I'll be happy to talk with you.
- Jeremy