Labrador Books

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Labrador Books

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1thornton37814
Ago 18, 2009, 10:52am

This is a thread for listing and discussing books with a Labrador setting.

2Nickelini
Dic 2, 2009, 12:18pm

Did you hear this thread creak when I opened it? I think a bat flew out too, and wow, what a lot of cobwebs.

Anyway, why is Labrador separate from Newfoundland?

3thornton37814
Dic 2, 2009, 9:53pm

Just in case someone wants to read one in each locale.

4RidgewayGirl
Dic 3, 2009, 8:58am

Are there any books set exclusively in Labrador? I think it will be even more difficult to find books set here than in Nunavut.

5thornton37814
Dic 3, 2009, 11:45am

If you don't mind non-fiction, there are quite a few. There's a history called The Story of Labrador by William Rompkey. There are several biographies of medical personnel who went there, including Northern Nurse by Elliott Merrick, Labrador Doctor by W. A. Paddon, and A Labrador Doctor by Wilfred Thomason Grenfell (an older book still being reprinted). Paddon apparently worked at Grenfell's mission. Then there is an account of a journey in Trekking Through Northern Labrador: A Woman's Odyssey by Marilyn Bussey.

The only fiction title I've come across is Labrador by Kathryn Davis. The non-fiction ones sound more interesting to me than it does though.

6Yells
Feb 7, 2010, 5:42pm

I am reading Creation by Katherine Govier right now and I am enjoying it so far. She lives in Ontario right now but the book itself is set in Labrador. It's a fictional account of Audubon's journey up the Labrador coast to draw/paint pictures of native birds. No idea how it ends as I am about 1/3 of the way through but I am really liking it so far.

7Bcteagirl
Editado: Jun 16, 2010, 3:54pm

Bump! Any more ideas? Not sure I have any Labrador books in mount TBR right now.

I see some have tagged The Shipping News and The Boat that wouldn't float as Labrador. Can anyone confirm this? I do have those two on hand!

8MsMoto
Editado: Jun 16, 2010, 4:07pm

I'm off to Newfoundland and Labrador next week. In preparation, I've been reading and re-reading lots of my favourites from this part of the world, but very few are what I'd feel comfortable describing as Labrador books. In front of me at the moment I have Theatre of Fish. Travels through Newfoundland and Labrador which you could just read half of! Mightn't necessarily be a bad thing!

A children's book I read a few years ago made enough of an impression that I included it in my Masters' thesis - Borrowed Black: A Labrador Fantasy.

9Nickelini
Jun 16, 2010, 5:59pm

>7 Bcteagirl: - The Shipping News is definitely NOT Labrador. It's set in New York and Newfoundland.

10Yells
Jun 16, 2010, 6:17pm

I found this site that has all kinds of reviews of books set in Newfoundland and Labrador. It looks quite interesting...
http://www.redislandnf.com/redbookreviews00.html

11Bcteagirl
Jun 16, 2010, 6:29pm

Thanks for the heads up to both of you!

12pmarshall
Jun 17, 2010, 1:14am

The Boat that wouldn't float is not Labrador. Mowat sails it around Atlantic Canada.

13Bcteagirl
Jun 17, 2010, 1:20am

Also good to know. Guess there was a bit of miss-tagging going on there :P Oh well, back to square one!

14Yells
Jun 17, 2010, 10:27am

Try Creation by Govier. It was a little odd at times but overall, I quite liked it. It's a fictional account of Audubon and his travels up the coast of Labrador.

15Bcteagirl
Jun 17, 2010, 11:02am

Yes, I put that one on my wishlist :) Thank you!

16Bcteagirl
Jul 2, 2010, 8:04pm

I snagged a Labrador book through the early reviewers!
Annabel By Kathleen Winter is apparently set there.
From an early review:
Annabel is the story of Wayne, a hermaphrodite child born in rural Labrador, and his, or her, or "its" difficult journey to adulthood.

As I go over gender when I teach developmental psychology, this should be a very interesting read for me. And a rare Labrador book to boot :)

17Yells
Jul 2, 2010, 9:00pm

After getting a message that I didn't snag anything, I then got a message that I snagged a copy of Annabel too! It looks quite good and there is already a positive review for it.

18Bcteagirl
Jul 2, 2010, 9:50pm

Wohoo! We will be reading it together then :) I like the cover too.. I am a sucker for nice bookcovers :P

19Bcteagirl
Jul 20, 2010, 9:34pm

I finally found another Labrador book! The Windflower by Gabrielle Roy (Touchstone not working):
http://www.librarything.com/work/971249/book/42630082

"Set against the austere landscape of northern Labrador, Windflower is the poignant story of Elsa Kumachuk, a young Inuit woman torn between two worlds by the birth of her blond-haired, blue-eyed son. Unacknowledged by his father, an American GI, the child is welcomed into the Inuit community with astonishment and delight. Elsa, however, must come to terms with the conflicting values implied by her son’s dual heritage.

Gabrielle Roy’s last novel, Windflower is both a moving account of one woman’s tragic dilemma and a sensitive portrait of a society in transition."

20Yells
Jul 20, 2010, 10:19pm

Hey! I read that one. It is quite good but disturbing as well. I read it years ago for a Canlit class but completely forgot it took place in Labrador.

21mathgirl40
Sep 1, 2010, 3:35pm

I'm not sure if Julian Comstock: A Story of 22nd-century America by Robert Charles Wilson "counts" as a Labrador book, but since we have so few candidates for Labrador, I thought I'd mention it.

This is a sci-fi (steampunk?) novel set in a future version of America which has regressed to Victorian technology and beliefs. Canada is a part of the US, and a quarter to a third of the novel takes place in Labrador, where the Americans are at war with the Dutch over the territory.

The reason I'm not sure if this novel counts as a Labrador book is that it shows Labrador, not as it is or has been, but as it could be many years from now. In any case, it's an interesting read and it's been nominated for this year's Hugo award. Once I got caught up in the story, the premise didn't seem as ludicrous as it first appeared. ("The Dutch invading Labrador??" was my first thought.)

22Bcteagirl
Sep 4, 2010, 5:54pm

Ooo that is good to know mathgirl, thank you! :)

23arrwa
Ene 6, 2011, 4:30pm

It's kinda neat the next Robert Munsch book will be set in Labrador.

24Bcteagirl
Ene 6, 2011, 4:44pm

Is it? Awesome! :)

25VivienneR
Ene 9, 2011, 5:41pm

I recently finished Windflower set in Labrador and Enchanted Summer set in Quebec, both by Gabrielle Roy. I really enjoyed both but I think the second book, which is made up of very short stories, was my favourite. I'll post a similar message in the Quebec thread.

26VivienneR
Feb 14, 2011, 3:48am

I'm the only person with this book at LT, but it would be worthwhile to seek it out: So few on earth : a Labrador Métis woman remembers is a memoir written by Josie Penny (unfortunately touchstones are not working for this title). Josie was born in Roaches Brook, Labrador to Métis parents who lived a semi-nomadic lifestyle. When she was seven years old she was sent to residential school. At eleven, she went to work. This memoir covers her life up until the age of seventeen. It is an inspiring story of a feisty, good-humoured child who loved her life and family.

27arrwa
Feb 16, 2011, 1:07am

26> That sounds great. Thanks for posting. I'll have to search it out.

28Bcteagirl
Feb 19, 2011, 4:24pm

That does sound great, thank you!

29mathgirl40
Feb 20, 2011, 8:04am

26: Thanks for the recommendation, VivienneR. It's not easy to find books set in Labrador!

30Bcteagirl
Sep 19, 2011, 11:24pm

Today, despite the best of intentions another book followed me home from the thrift store. A retro drawing cover shows eskimo's travelling wearing blinder things with slits to prevent sun blindness.

"The best novel to come out of Canada in Generations' it says on the front, apparently an endorsement by Farley Mowat.

A Novel of Labrador White Eskimo is the title, by Harold Andrew Horwood.

The description takes up the entire back cover, the final paragraph reading 'White Eskimo is the story of Esau Gillingham.. the dramatic account of three cultures - Indian, Eskimo and White - Colliding in the Arctic wilderness; a story 'with a backbone of history' written by a man who knows Labrador intimately. "

One to add to your wishlists apparently! :)

31thornton37814
Sep 27, 2011, 10:28am

I had expected Windflower to be set in Labrador based on this thread, but as I took out my atlas and compared the geographic spots mentioned, I discovered it was set in Quebec's Nunavik region.

32Andrew_MC
Abr 28, 2012, 5:39am

Non-fiction suggestion: The Lure of the Labrador Wild by Dillon Wallace, originally published in 1905.

I remember when I was a high school student in Newfoundland this book was on the reading list for our English class...it's an account of an ill-fated wilderness expedition into the interior of Labrador in 1903. It's been nearly 30 years since I read it, and I was just 13 at the time, but from what I do remember I would recommend it.

33LibraryCin
Feb 3, 2014, 9:47pm

Oh, that one about Audubon sounds good!

34jarmar
Nov 30, 2018, 5:58pm

Hi. I am looking for a fictional novel about an airplane carrying toxic waste crashing in Labrador. The plane was on its way to Ontario. It is an older paperback. Thanks. Jim