Book shows Lewis and Tolkien influence

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Book shows Lewis and Tolkien influence

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1SSands Primer Mensaje
Oct 7, 2006, 12:16am

I just recently finished the short story collection "Tales from 2 A.M." and saw the clear influence of Lewis. At the end of the collection, the author acknowledged Tolkien as an inspiration. This is coming from an author who is outside the fantasy camp--he's published several realistic novels. Does anyone know other contemporary authors who publicly acknowledge Lewis and Tolkien as prime influences?

2waiting4morning
Oct 7, 2006, 8:48am

J.K. Rowling is one. I know there are others; but I can't think of them off the top of my head.

3MyopicBookworm
Ene 12, 2007, 5:31pm

Lewis is a bit unfashionable, and I've not heard of many recent fiction writers citing him as an influence.

4barney67
Feb 7, 2007, 1:17pm

I've been on a quest to find authors who are writing in this tradition. To me, this means a certain mythic outlook but one which attempts to resuscitate the moral imagination, as Burke described it.

I'd include Ray Bradbury and one book by Fred Chappell called More Shapes Than One. Although there is a lot of fantasy lit out there, it is difficult to find books that have quite this flavor.

5barney67
Feb 7, 2007, 1:21pm

Russell Kirk has a brief chapter on the Inklings in his book Enemies of the Permanent Things.

Kirk's own fiction aspired to similarly high goals:

Ancestral Shadows
Lord of the Hollow Dark
Old House of Fear

6MyopicBookworm
Editado: Feb 8, 2007, 6:27pm

There's a Christian moral undertone in Prince of the Godborn and the rest of the Seven Citadels fantasy sequence by Geraldine Harris, though the strongest overt influence here is Ursula le Guin.

7Lewisfan
Abr 30, 2008, 9:07pm

I just finished heartstone also by Schreiber (see Message #1) and was amazed at the fantasy. The author clearly pays homage to classic mythology but then puts some neat spins on old favorites (i.e. trolls). He has a Christian base to the fantasy without being quite as obvious as Lewis nor as "hidden" as Tolkien. If you're looking for a new, undiscovered fantasy, check out this one.

8hayesstw
Editado: Sep 7, 2008, 12:39pm

A couple of years ago I challenged people on a mailing list to write a novel in the style of Charles Williams. Unfortunately there were few takers. I think the novels of Phil Rickman come quite close to Williams, particularly his earlier ones.

9wigster102
Jun 16, 2009, 10:00am

Neil Gaiman has mentioned on his blog several times about the influence that many of the Inklings have had on his writing, including Lewis.

10agmlll
Sep 12, 2009, 11:11am

It's not a book but the Wolfram & Hart legal firm on the Angel TV series seems very similar to the National Institute of Coordinated Experiments in C. S. Lewis' That Hideous Strength

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