Imagen del autor

James Joyce (1) (1882–1941)

Autor de Ulises

Para otros autores llamados James Joyce, ver la página de desambiguación.

511+ Obras 84,261 Miembros 953 Reseñas 433 Preferidas
Hay 3 debates abiertos sobre este autor. Míralos ahora.

Sobre El Autor

James Joyce was born on February 2, 1882, in Dublin, Ireland, into a large Catholic family. Joyce was a very good pupil, studying poetics, languages, and philosophy at Clongowes Wood College, Belvedere College, and the Royal University in Dublin. Joyce taught school in Dalkey, Ireland, before mostrar más marrying in 1904. Joyce lived in Zurich and Triest, teaching languages at Berlitz schools, and then settled in Paris in 1920 where he figured prominently in the Parisian literary scene, as witnessed by Ernest Hemingway's A Moveable Feast. Joyce's collection of fine short stories, Dubliners, was published in 1914, to critical acclaim. Joyce's major works include A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Ulysses, Finnegans Wake, and Stephen Hero. Ulysses, published in 1922, is considered one of the greatest English novels of the 20th century. The book simply chronicles one day in the fictional life of Leopold Bloom, but it introduces stream of consciousness as a literary method and broaches many subjects controversial to its day. As avant-garde as Ulysses was, Finnegans Wake is even more challenging to the reader as an important modernist work. Joyce died just two years after its publication, in 1941. (Bowker Author Biography) mostrar menos

Series

Obras de James Joyce

Ulises (1922) 24,388 copias, 337 reseñas
Retrato del artista adolescente (1916) 21,436 copias, 216 reseñas
Dublineses (1914) 19,922 copias, 228 reseñas
Finnegans wake (1939) 5,401 copias, 58 reseñas
The Portable James Joyce (1947) 1,062 copias, 3 reseñas
Los muertos (1914) 919 copias, 16 reseñas
Stephen el héroe (1944) 707 copias, 2 reseñas
Exiliados (1918) 631 copias, 6 reseñas
Dubliners (Viking Critical Library) (1914) 587 copias, 2 reseñas
Dublineses (Norton Critical Edition) (2006) 536 copias, 4 reseñas
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (Viking Critical Library) (1914) — Autor — 424 copias, 1 reseña
The Essential James Joyce (1948) 324 copias, 2 reseñas
Giacomo Joyce (1968) 280 copias, 4 reseñas
Six Great Modern Short Novels (1954) — Contribuidor — 274 copias, 2 reseñas
Música de Cámara (1971) 257 copias, 3 reseñas
Ulises (1966) 250 copias, 4 reseñas
Poesía Completa (1937) 250 copias, 1 reseña
Pomes Penyeach (1927) 198 copias, 3 reseñas
Escritos críticos (1959) 194 copias, 1 reseña
The Selected Letters of James Joyce (1957) 189 copias, 1 reseña
A Shorter Finnegans Wake (1966) 157 copias
The Works of James Joyce (1995) 131 copias
The Cats of Copenhagen (2012) 122 copias, 8 reseñas
Letters of James Joyce (1957) 111 copias
The Cat and the Devil (1936) 104 copias, 5 reseñas
Poems and Exiles (1992) 90 copias
Poems and Shorter Writings (1991) 80 copias
Araby (2007) 76 copias, 3 reseñas
100 Eternal Masterpieces of Literature - volume 2 (2020) — Contribuidor — 72 copias
Introducing James Joyce (1942) 52 copias
Obras completas (1995) 42 copias
Mini Modern Classics Two Gallants (2011) 38 copias, 1 reseña
Finnegans Wake H.C.E. (1939) 35 copias, 1 reseña
Ulysses in Nighttown (1958) 30 copias, 1 reseña
Eveline [short story] (1990) 30 copias, 3 reseñas
The Little Review "Ulysses" (2015) 27 copias
Ulysses: A Critical and Synoptic Edition (1984) 26 copias, 2 reseñas
Brieven aan Nora (1976) 25 copias, 1 reseña
James Joyce in Padua (1977) 25 copias
Ulysses / Dubliners (2013) 23 copias
The James Joyce Collection (1996) 23 copias
Grace (1976) 22 copias, 1 reseña
Finn's Hotel (1993) 21 copias
Joyce: Poems and a Play (2014) 21 copias
Epifanías; Epifanías sin fin (1956) 20 copias, 1 reseña
On Ibsen (1998) 20 copias
Reading Classics : James Joyce : A selection from Dubliners (1993) — Autor — 18 copias, 1 reseña
Racconti e romanzi (1974) 16 copias
Ulisse. Guida alla lettura (1961) 15 copias
Dubliners: A Selection (1971) 13 copias
An Encounter [short story] (1982) 13 copias
Stories from six authors (1960) — Contribuidor — 12 copias, 1 reseña
The James Joyce Audio Collection (1992) 11 copias, 2 reseñas
Poemas Manzanas (1973) 10 copias
Ulysses {Manga Classic Reader} (2012) 10 copias, 1 reseña
Os Mortos (2017) 9 copias
Cartas escogidas (1982) 9 copias
Letters of James Joyce, Volume 2 (1966) — Autor — 8 copias
Dubliners Pt.2 (1999) 8 copias
Clay (2012) 7 copias, 1 reseña
Ulisse. Testo inglese a fronte (2021) 7 copias, 1 reseña
A Painful Case (2012) 7 copias
Molly Bloom (1994) 7 copias
Dubliners (part 1) (1999) 6 copias
James Joyce Letters, Volumes II And III (1966) — Autor — 6 copias
Erzählungen aus Dublin / Dublin Stories. (1992) 6 copias, 1 reseña
Counterparts (2014) 6 copias
Maran och gracehoppet (2002) 6 copias
A Little Cloud (2012) 6 copias
James Joyce: Poems (2014) 5 copias
Best-loved Joyce (2017) 5 copias
Reading Classics : James Joyce : Dubliners (1995) — Writer — 5 copias
Ausgewählte Schriften. (1984) 5 copias
Cartes : antologia (2013) 5 copias
Retrato del joven artista (2022) 5 copias
After the Race (2014) 5 copias
Exílios e poemas (2022) 5 copias
A Mother (2012) 5 copias
The Sisters (2012) 4 copias
Oda Muzigi (2011) 4 copias
Lettere e saggi (2016) 4 copias
Ulises Volume I (1979) 4 copias
Dubliners (Longman Cultural Editions) (2010) 4 copias, 1 reseña
Cartas a Nora (2012) 4 copias
Els Morts (2021) 3 copias
Ulysses : X 3 copias
Cuentos y prosas breves (2022) 3 copias
POESIAS COMPLETAS. (1987) 3 copias
Listy (1986) 3 copias
De santos e sábios (2012) 3 copias
Poesie e prose (1992) 3 copias
De döda (2017) 3 copias
Prosa (Quarto) (2010) 2 copias
Relatos de Dublineses (2014) 2 copias
Kopenhag'in Kedileri (2016) 2 copias
Complete Works 2 copias
Poetry (2022) 2 copias
Pisma estetyczne (2021) 2 copias
The Best of James Joyce (2016) 2 copias
James Joyce: "Dubliners" (1982) 2 copias
Daniel Defoe 2 copias
POÈMES (1967) 2 copias
James Joyce Gift Box (1994) 2 copias
Werke in sechs Bänden. (1987) 2 copias
Ulises T2 1 copia
Kamarazene 1 copia, 1 reseña
Et Tu, Healy! 1 copia
El gat i el diable (1993) 1 copia
JAMES JOYCE - GORMAN (1948) 1 copia
Æskumynd listamannsins (2000) 1 copia
[Ulisse] [1! 1 copia
Six Stories 1 copia
Pirandello, Joyce, Brecht — Autor — 1 copia
ユリシーズ〈12〉 (1996) 1 copia
Одисей (2020) 1 copia
Passion: Men on Men {audio} — Contribuidor — 1 copia
Kedi ile Seytan (2012) 1 copia
Nora'ya Mektuplar (2018) 1 copia
Ölüler (2017) 1 copia
Të mërguarit, 1 copia, 1 reseña
Dubliners = Dubliňané (2016) 1 copia
The dead 1 copia
Dei døde (2017) 1 copia
Joyce:Collected Poems (1957) 1 copia
Querida Nora! 1 copia
Selected Short Stories (1999) 1 copia
James Joyce's Dublin (1950) 1 copia
Kammarmusik : dikter (1982) 1 copia
The Complete Poetry 1 copia, 1 reseña
Sin título 1 copia
Φανερώσεις (1994) 1 copia
Música de cambra (2016) 1 copia
Classic Irish Short Stories, Volume 2 (2023) 1 copia, 1 reseña
I morti 1 copia
ULISE VOL2 1 copia

Obras relacionadas

El retrato de Dorian Gray (1890) — Contribuidor, algunas ediciones40,073 copias, 628 reseñas
50 Great Short Stories (1952) — Contribuidor — 1,275 copias, 8 reseñas
Literature: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama (1995) — Contribuidor, algunas ediciones937 copias, 7 reseñas
My Mistress's Sparrow Is Dead (2008) — Contribuidor — 771 copias, 20 reseñas
Short Story Masterpieces (1954) — Contribuidor — 687 copias, 3 reseñas
Antología de la literatura fantástica (1940) — Contribuidor — 618 copias, 13 reseñas
The Oxford Book of Short Stories (1981) — Contribuidor — 516 copias, 4 reseñas
A Pocket Book of Modern Verse (1954) — Contribuidor, algunas ediciones451 copias, 2 reseñas
The Penguin Book of English Short Stories (1967) — Contribuidor — 434 copias, 4 reseñas
The Rag and Bone Shop of the Heart: A Poetry Anthology (1992) — Contribuidor — 394 copias, 3 reseñas
Literature: The Human Experience (2006) — Contribuidor — 342 copias
Best Short Stories of the Modern Age (1962) — Contribuidor, algunas ediciones337 copias, 4 reseñas
The World's Greatest Short Stories (2006) — Contribuidor — 276 copias, 1 reseña
The Penguin Book of Contemporary Verse (1950) — Contribuidor, algunas ediciones267 copias, 3 reseñas
A World of Great Stories (1947) 264 copias, 4 reseñas
The Penguin Book of Irish Verse (1970) — Contribuidor — 201 copias
Imagist Poetry (Penguin Modern Classics) (1972) — Contribuidor — 163 copias, 2 reseñas
Short Novels of the Masters (1948) — Contribuidor — 157 copias, 1 reseña
The Penguin Book of Irish Fiction (1999) — Contribuidor — 151 copias
Great Irish Short Stories (1964) — Contribuidor — 143 copias
Imagist Poetry: An Anthology (1999) — Contribuidor — 138 copias, 1 reseña
The Penguin Book of Irish Short Stories (1981) — Contribuidor — 133 copias, 1 reseña
Irish Tales of Terror (1988) — Contribuidor — 128 copias, 2 reseñas
Classic Irish Short Stories (1957) 119 copias, 2 reseñas
The Second Penguin Book of English Short Stories (1972) — Contribuidor, algunas ediciones119 copias
Great Irish Tales of Fantasy and Myth (1994) — Contribuidor — 110 copias, 1 reseña
The Imagist Poem (1963) — Contribuidor, algunas ediciones102 copias
Soul: An Archaeology--Readings from Socrates to Ray Charles (1994) — Contribuidor — 101 copias
Norton Introduction to the Short Novel (1982) — Contribuidor, algunas ediciones100 copias, 1 reseña
Great Irish Detective Stories (1993) — Contribuidor — 89 copias
The Treasury of English Short Stories (1985) — Contribuidor — 85 copias
Ten Modern Masters: An Anthology of the Short Story (1953) — Contribuidor, algunas ediciones74 copias
The Bedside Book of Famous British Stories (1940) — Contribuidor — 67 copias
Elements of Fiction (1968) — Contribuidor — 65 copias
The Gender of Modernism: A Critical Anthology (1990) — Contribuidor — 63 copias, 1 reseña
Great Irish Short Stories (Dover Thrift Editions) (2005) — Contribuidor — 59 copias
The Erotic Impulse: Honoring the Sensual Self (1992) — Contribuidor — 54 copias, 1 reseña
Faber Book of Ballads (1965) — Contribuidor — 51 copias, 1 reseña
Art of Fiction (1967) — Contribuidor — 51 copias
Modern Short Stories (1939) — Contribuidor — 49 copias, 1 reseña
Masters of the Modern Short Story (1945) — Contribuidor — 47 copias
Modern Irish Short Stories (1957) — Contribuidor — 43 copias
Great Irish Stories of the Supernatural (1992) — Contribuidor — 41 copias
A Quarto of Modern Literature (1935) — Contribuidor — 40 copias
The Penguin Book of Irish Comic Writing (1996) — Autor, algunas ediciones26 copias, 1 reseña
Oscar Wilde: A Collection of Critical Essays (1969) — Contribuidor — 26 copias
One World of Literature (1992) — Contribuidor — 24 copias
Studies in Fiction (1965) — Contribuidor — 22 copias, 1 reseña
Masters of British Literature, Volume B (2007) — Contribuidor — 17 copias
Wild Night Company: Irish Tales of Terror (1970) — Contribuidor — 17 copias
Great Classic Stories II: Eighteen Unabridged Classics (2010) — Contribuidor — 16 copias
Uomini che non ho sposato (2016) — Contribuidor — 15 copias
Twenty-Nine Stories (1960) — Contribuidor — 14 copias
Story to Anti-Story (1979) — Contribuidor — 13 copias
31 Stories (1960) — Contribuidor — 12 copias, 2 reseñas
Des Imagistes: An Anthology (1914) — Contribuidor — 11 copias, 1 reseña
England forteller : britiske og irske noveller (1970) — Contribuidor — 10 copias
The Banned Books Compendium: 32 Classic Forbidden Books — Contribuidor — 9 copias, 7 reseñas
Bloom (2003) — Original novel — 8 copias, 1 reseña
Bibliothek Suhrkamp. Ein Lesebuch, Klassiker der Moderne (1989) — Contribuidor — 8 copias
Men and Women: The Poetry of Love (1970) — Contribuidor — 8 copias
Survivors: Series Three (2015) — Narrador — 8 copias
The Caedmon Short Story Collection (2001) — Contribuidor — 7 copias
The Story Survey (1953) — Contribuidor — 6 copias
Modern Short Stories in English (Literature for Life) (1993) — Contribuidor — 4 copias
Short Fiction: Shape and Substance (1971) — Contribuidor — 3 copias
Enjoying Stories (1987) — Contribuidor — 2 copias
Modern Short Stories — Contribuidor — 2 copias
Stories of Horror and Suspense: An Anthology (1977) — Contribuidor — 2 copias
To You With Love: A Treasury of Great Romantic Literature (1969) — Contribuidor — 2 copias
Contact collection of contemporary writers — Contribuidor — 1 copia
Modern Choice 2 — Contribuidor — 1 copia
Travesties [theatre programme] — Contribuidor, algunas ediciones1 copia
Introduction to Fiction (1974) — Contribuidor — 1 copia

Etiquetado

1001 (257) 1001 libros (300) Antología (1,080) Británico/a (445) Clásico/a (2,692) Clásicos/as (3,049) Cuentos (2,743) Dublín (805) En propiedad (271) Fantasía (420) Ficción (12,811) ficción irlandesa (352) Folio Society (257) Gótico (444) Horror (647) Inglaterra (271) Inglés (421) Irlanda (2,519) Irlandés (2,253) James Joyce (816) Joyce (963) Kindle (360) Leído/a (1,010) Libro electrónico (416) Literatura (3,930) literatura británica (604) Literatura Clásica (382) Literatura de Irlanda (2,455) Literatura inglesa (928) Modernismo (1,100) no leído (726) Novela (2,315) Poesía (1,155) Por leer (4,664) Propio (490) romano (407) Siglo XIX (692) Siglo XX (1,521) stream of consciousness (344) Victoriano (335)

Conocimiento común

Nombre legal
Joyce, James Augustine Aloysius
Fecha de nacimiento
1882-02-02
Fecha de fallecimiento
1941-01-13
Lugar de sepultura
Fluntern Cemetery, Fluntern, Canton ZÜrich, Switzerland
Género
male
Nacionalidad
Ierland
País (para mapa)
Ireland
Lugar de nacimiento
Dublin, Ireland
Lugar de fallecimiento
Zurich, Switzerland
Causa de fallecimiento
perforated ulcer
Lugares de residencia
Dublin, Ierland
Triëst, Italë
Zürich, Zwitserland
Parijs, Frankrijk
Ocupaciones
writer
Relaciones
Joyce, Stanislaus (brother)
Organizaciones
The Imagists
Premios y honores
Feis Ceoil bronze medal (singing; 1904)
Biografía breve
James Augustine Aloysius Joyce (2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) was an Irish novelist, short story writer, poet, teacher, and literary critic. He was born in Dublin into a middle-class family, and briefly attended the Christian Brothers-run O'Connell School before excelling at the Jesuit schools Clongowes and Belvedere. He went on to attend University College Dublin.

In 1904, in his early twenties, Joyce emigrated to continental Europe with his partner (and later wife) Nora Barnacle.

Miembros

Debates

Thornwillow's Ulysses en Fine Press Forum (julio 2)
Finnegans Wake en Folio Society Devotees (mayo 3)
#80 Days of Ulysses en 2023 Category Challenge (julio 2023)
New LE: Ulysses by James Joyce en Folio Society Devotees (Febrero 2022)
New LE Ulysses - James Joyce- Limitation 500 - £495 en Folio Society Devotees (Enero 2022)
Ulysses - latest edition. en Folio Society Devotees (Enero 2022)
James Joyce en Geeks who love the Classics (diciembre 2021)
James Joyce: Dubliners en Literary Centennials (abril 2014)
James Joyce Legacy Library en Legacy Libraries (Septiembre 2013)
The challenge that is Ulysses en Literary Snobs (Febrero 2012)
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man en Someone explain it to me... (Septiembre 2011)
Happy Bloomsday, everybody! en Le Salon Littéraire du Peuple pour le Peuple (junio 2011)
Allusions to Ulysses en Le Salon Littéraire du Peuple pour le Peuple (mayo 2009)

Reseñas

El proyecto literario de James Joyce (1882-1941) se cuenta entre los más complejos y arriesgados del pasado siglo. Partiendo de un acuciado interés por la sociedad humana, renovó el lenguaje narrativo en busca de las herramientas que le permitiesen retratar la vasta red de relaciones materiales y simbólicas que la constituyen, y en la que el individuo anónimo debe desenvolverse en busca de su propia identidad. En su primera obra, "Dublineses", Joyce despliega ya un mapa de su pensamiento literario. A lo largo de sus quince relatos, se nos presenta la Dublín de principios del siglo XX a partir de algunos de sus ciudadanos de a pie, a los que se confiere, en su ajetreo diario, una significación heroica. Así, y con un afán tan localista como totalizador, el autor plasma en detalle la imagen de su ciudad natal, que se ve convertida, metonímicamente, en una representación del mundo urbano de su tiempo.… (más)
 
Denunciada
Jmmon | 227 reseñas más. | Aug 12, 2023 |
La mejor manera de leer Ulises sería zambullirse directamente en sus páginas, dejándose llevar por el poderío musical y ambiental de su palabra, y encomendando confiadamente sus oscuridades a la esperanza de una gradual familiarización con la obra. Sólo para la relectura —esencial, como en toda gran cima de la literatura universal— sería ya plenamente lícito utilizar informaciones y referencias externas. De hecho, lo relatado en Ulises es sencillísimo, y aun vulgar: la dificultad del libro radica en que su autor, como gran poeta que es, aunque en prosa, tiene una viva memoria verbal —incluso auditiva—, y no sólo incorpora las innumerables asociaciones lingüísticas que hay en su mente —citas literarias, trozos de óperas, canciones, vocablos extranjeros, chistes y juegos de palabras, términos teológicos y científicos, etc. —, sino que supone que su lector ha de tener el mismo don de buena memoria —aparte de que, lo que ya es demasiado pedir, ha de poseer su mismo archivo de recuerdos sonoros. Y ese requerimiento de buena memoria verbal es hoy día aún más aventurado que cuando se escribió Ulises: la educación y la técnica contemporáneas están debilitando y desprestigiando la memoria —sobre todo en cuanto memoria verbal. Ya los niños no aprenden versos de memoria en la escuela, y se considera elegante, y aun típico de un intelectual, presumir de mala memoria (nadie presume de mala inteligencia, en cambio). A cada momento, en efecto, hay en Ulises frases y expresiones cuyo sentido radica en que son repeticiones o parodias de alguna frase que apareció antes —a lo mejor, quinientas páginas antes. Por supuesto, esto resulta más grave en el lenguaje en sordina de una traducción, aun suponiendo que el traductor, por su parte, tenga suficiente memoria verbal como para haber reconocido la repetición en el original. Y no le era dado al traductor —ni para este problema, ni para ningún otro de los muchos que hay en Ulises— recurrir a las notas a pie de página: una traducción de Ulises no puede llevar notas porque, en caso de darlas con un mínimo de homogeneidad informativa, alcanzarían mayor extensión que el texto mismo (sólo para las alusiones literarias existe un índice de más de quinientas páginas: Weldon Thornton, Allusions in “Ulysses”, Nueva
York, 1973). El lector ha de suponer que en cualquier momento Joyce puede estar citando o caricaturizando un texto previo —que ni siquiera reconoce la inmensa mayoría de los lectores de lengua inglesa. En otro sentido, tampoco hubiera valido la pena poner la nota de “En español en el original” en los casos en que van aquí en cursiva palabras por lo demás normales —especialmente claro es el caso cuando se reproducen en forma gramaticalmente incorrecta. Tampoco había verdadera necesidad de poner nota en el caso de los innumerables juegos de palabras: a veces, se ha logrado reproducir el juego en español, o sustituirlo por otro parecido; otras veces, ha habido que dejarlo perder; en algunos casos, había que mantener a toda costa el juego de palabras como tal, porque luego reaparecería como leit–motiv, pero, a la vez, no se encontraba un chiste equivalente: entonces se ha dejado el juego en inglés, acompañándolo de su versión literal y sin gracia, para que el lector sepa a qué atenerse (al fin y al cabo, Cortázar y Carlos Fuentes nos han acostumbrado a los juegos de palabras en inglés en boca de hispanohablantes). Al final del libro, en Apéndice, para quien quiera entretenerse en semejantes crucigramas, se incluye el esquema de interpretación simbólica que trazó el propio Joyce para uso de amigos, pero prohibiéndoles que lo publicaran: hubo siempre un conflicto entre el Joyce creador —narrador poético y musical de la sencilla realidad humana en su Dublín familiar— y el Joyce aficionado a los juegos de palabras, los
paralelismos y los simbolismos historicoculturales, que serían pedantescos si no fueran humorísticos. Djuna Barnes cuenta que, en vísperas de la publicación de Ulises, James Joyce le confió, en el café Les Deux Magots: “Lo malo es que el público pedirá y encontrará una moraleja en mi libro, o peor, que lo tomará de algún modo serio, y, por mi honor de caballero, no hay en él una sola línea en serio”.

Aquí, en estas páginas de información previa, procuraremos atenernos a lo directamente dado en Ulises y a la circunstancia histórica en que surge y que
retrata, reduciendo a su mínimo inevitable las referencias homéricas (en rigor, sólo presentes en el título de la obra: los títulos de alusión a la Odisea que
presidían los capítulos publicados en revistas, fueron suprimidos en el libro). Sabemos que Joyce recomendaba a sus amigos que releyeran despacio la Odisea antes de abordar Ulises, pero no hay ninguna razón para que las referencias externas aconsejadas por un autor sean realmente convenientes para la lectura. Más bien parece obvio que al lector de Ulises le conviene conocer una buena parte de la obra anterior de James Joyce, es decir, Dublineses, como estampas de ambiente y presentación de algunas de las figuras de Ulises, y, sobre todo, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, que en la memorable traducción de Alfonso Donado (Dámaso Alonso) se tituló El artista adolescente, pero cuyo título quizá convenga entender poniéndolo dentro de la terminología de la historia del arte, algo así como Retrato del artista joven o Autorretrato juvenil. Casi cabe considerar el Autorretrato como el primer volumen de Ulises: su protagonista, Stephen Dedalus, contrafigura del autor (en su juventud), será protagonista de los tres primeros capítulos y del noveno de Ulises y deuteragonista de algunos de los restantes, en contrapunto con Leopold Bloom, “autorretrato” de un posible y malogrado “artista ya no joven” y ya no artista —auto caricatura, en realidad, del Joyce maduro. Pero con esto estamos preludiando ya la apoyatura informativa que, en todo caso, no le viene mal tener al lector de Ulises, bien sea para usar antes de la lectura, o, mejor, después, en recapitulación preparatoria a la relectura, o, aún mejor, nunca, simplemente sabiendo que está ahí y la podría consultar si quisiera. Tras la información sucinta sobre la circunstancia histórica, vida del autor, y génesis de Ulises, damos una síntesis de los capítulos de la obra, a modo de plano o guía: por cierto, que, al aludir a los capítulos, lo haremos siempre mediante su número de orden, puesto entre corchetes, ya que el autor no los numeró, y, en el libro, apenas indicó su separación, sino que sólo los
agrupó en tres secuencias: 1, que comprende los capítulos [1] a [3]; 2, de [4] a [15]; y 3, de [16] a [18]. Es de notar cómo van creciendo en extensión los
capítulos: así, los tres primeros, sumados (o sea, toda la secuencia 1) no equivalen ni a la mitad de la extensión del capítulo [15]. Los críticos acostumbran a designar las tres secuencias y los dieciocho capítulos de Ulises por sus respectivas referencias a episodios o entidades de la Odisea, según hizo Joyce al publicar en revista algunos de esos capítulos. Pero, como ya se advirtió, Joyce suprimió esos títulos en el libro, por lo que preferimos indicarlos sólo de
pasada en estas informaciones previas, para no imponer demasiado al lector tal referencia clásica —a veces, como se señalará, traída por los pelos. Después, en el cuerpo del libro mismo, también nos hemos permitido añadir esos números entre corchetes en la cabecera de los capítulos para que el lector pueda hacer más fácil uso de las informaciones que aquí ofrecemos, si es que así lo desea. Ulises cuenta lo que les ocurre a esos dos personajes de James Joyce —Stephen Dedalus y Leopold Bloom— en Dublín, desde las 8 de la mañana del jueves 4 de junio de 1904 hasta las 2 de la madrugada siguiente (las tres primeras horas, por separado, duplicando el relato), con un apéndice, desde las 2 hasta alrededor de las 3 de esa madrugada, en la mente en duermevela de Molly Bloom, esposa de Leopold. La ciudad y la vida del autor, pues, forman el material del libro: un material que Joyce hace maravillosamente perceptible a sus lectores, pero sin duda contando con que éstos supieran de su propio mundo más de lo que cabe pedir que sepa un lector hispano actual. Aunque Joyce no se propone hacer “novela social”, su Dublín resulta tan palpable como el Londres de Dickens o el París de Balzac o el de Zola: sin ánimo especial de exponer luchas por el dinero y el poder —o, simplemente, la subsistencia—, como los clásicos de la novela decimonónica, nos sumerge directamente en la sensación de las estrecheces de la pequeña clase media dublinesa, con el alcohol, la música —y, tal vez, la mujer— como únicas aperturas de evasión y olvido. Cierto que esto, que hubiera sido suficiente para otros novelistas, en Joyce no es más que el telón de fondo, pero también cuenta mucho como tal. Irlanda era entonces —con poco más de cinco millones de habitantes— parte del Reino Unido británico, bajo una peculiar autonomía presidida por un virrey que residía en “el Castillo”: su comitiva recorre las calles en los capítulos [10] y [11]. En comparación con la gran expansión económica inglesa durante el siglo XIX, Irlanda había quedado rezagada —salvo en el Ulster, la zona del nordeste que no se independizaría de Inglaterra y que aún es famosa por la endémica guerra civil que los medios informativos presentan como guerra religiosa entre católicos y protestantes, callando el hecho de que aquéllos sean la clase oprimida y éstos la opresora. La secular miseria irlandesa no se había resuelto más que a medias durante el siglo XIX —uno de sus más sólidos progresos fue la difusión de la patata como alimento humano (es curioso que Leopold Bloom lleve siempre en el bolsillo, como talismán heredado de su madre, una pequeña patata vieja y arrugada). La emigración a Norteamérica, en los famosos barcos–ataúd”, tomaba caracteres desesperados en los años de mala cosecha de patata (una de las informaciones de la prensa dublinesa del 16 de junio de 1904, aludida en Ulises, es la vista judicial de una estafa prometiendo pasaje barato al Canadá). En Irlanda, dejada así atrás por Inglaterra, como proveedora de productos agrícolas y ganado, crece durante el siglo XIX un movimiento autonomista que llega a adquirir gran energía en los años ochenta bajo el liderazgo de Charles Stewart Parnell —uno de los leit–motive de Ulises: su hermano sobreviviente, John, aparece en varios capítulos, y en el [16] Leopold Bloom recuerda cómo, en su juventud, conoció al gran jefe en una revuelta, con asalto a un periódico, y le recogió el sombrero que se le cayó en la refriega. El proyecto de reconocimiento legal de la autonomía irlandesa (Home Rule) fue aprobado en 1886 por la Cámara de los Comunes, pero no por la de los Lores, a pesar del apoyo del premier Gladstone: por otra parte, Parnell cayó en desprestigio al ser llevado a los tribunales por un marido ofendido. El clero, y muchos de sus secuaces, le abandonaron —se alude a ello repetidamente en Ulises—, pero al morir poco después Parnell, se difundió la leyenda de que no había muerto, sino que esperaba el retorno en el destierro, y en su tumba (descrita en [6]) se había enterrado un ataúd lleno de piedras. El partido autonomista se desvaneció con Parnell, reemplazándole varias fuerzas: ante todo, la tan mencionada en Ulises, los del Sinn Fein (“Nosotros Solos”, en lengua vernácula), inicialmente de carácter no–violento y pequeño– burgués; el laborismo irlandés, que quería extender las agitaciones de protesta hacia el proletariado urbano y rural; la hermandad secreta Irish Republican Brotherhood; y, como movimiento intelectual y literario, la Gaelic League, que afluye a la gran reviviscencia del teatro y la lírica irlandesa —en lengua inglesa, sin embargo, principalmente—, que tuvo en Lady Gregory su principal promotora y en W. B. Yeats su más característico y alto poeta —sin olvidar a A. E. (George Moore), presentado sarcásticamente en [10]. (La tragedia de este movimiento literario fue que sus figuras más sólidas se ausentaran del país: G. B. Shaw, para triunfar en Londres; el propio Joyce, como exilado voluntario en el Continente.)

En 1904, cuando se desarrolla la acción de Ulises, los movimientos irlandeses no habían alcanzado aún su punto de ebullición, pero en 1916, a los dos de los ocho años que tardó Joyce en escribir Ulises, se produce una rebelión armada que es dominada por las fuerzas británicas, ajusticiando a sus jefes,
pero que hace evidente la imposibilidad de mantener el estado de cosas frente al crecimiento de los laboristas y los cada vez más radicalizados Sinn Fein. En las elecciones de 1918 triunfa el Sinn Fein, flanqueado y desbordado por la aún hoy famosa I.R.A.: a fines de 1921, Inglaterra accede a dar a Irlanda una independencia apenas vinculada por la condición llamada de Dominion. En 1949, Irlanda se separaría incluso de la Commonwealth. James Joyce no sólo no se identificó con el nacionalismo irlandés, sino que lo atacó de modo sarcástico y a veces brutal. Dentro de Ulises, tal actitud tiene su condensación más extremosa en [12], caricatura de un innominado “Ciudadano”, monomaníaco exaltador de lo irlandés, en contraste con Bloom, que, hijo de un judío húngaro y desarraigado incluso de su propia raza, resulta un verdadero apátrida, mirado con recelo y distanciamiento por los dublineses, por más que proclame que su patria es Irlanda. En ese capítulo, la fantasía sobre la ejecución del joven rebelde irlandés resulta quizá demasiado cruel si se piensa que se escribió después de la ejecución de los jefes rebeldes de 1916. No es extraño que James Joyce haya tenido en su propio país una mala prensa que todavía colea: desde 1904, como veremos en seguida con más detalle, abandona Irlanda, para volver sólo en alguna visita ocasional, hasta 1912: morirá, en 1941, sin haber vuelto a poner los pies en Irlanda —y sólo muy fugazmente en Inglaterra. Pero esa falta de sentido nacionalista está en significativo contraste con su monomaníaca obsesión —a la vez amor y odio— por Dublín, tema único de toda su vida. James Augustine Joyce nació el 2 de febrero de 1882 en las afueras de Dublín — en Rathmines. Vale la pena anotar esa fecha — la Candelaria— porque en ella, cuarenta años exactos después, recibiría Joyce los primeros ejemplares de Ulises, enviados urgentemente por medio de un maquinista de tren para que le llegasen en el día de su cumpleaños; vale la pena anotar también su segundo nombre porque él le añadiría en su confirmación el de Aloysius (Luis Gonzaga), como buen escolar que era entonces de los jesuitas —entre 1888 y 1891, en el colegio Conglowes. Por dificultades económicas, el padre de Joyce, John Stanislaus —retratado en Autorretrato y Ulises como Simon Dedalus—, trasladó a James a otro colegio más modesto —humillante episodio que Joyce silenció siempre, pero que da materia al primer trozo de [10], con la actitud condescendiente del jesuita Conmee ante los chicos de las Escuelas Cristianas. El P. Conmee, figura real, fue profesor de Joyce en Conglowes, y pasó luego de rector a la escuela media jesuítica Belvedere, donde hizo entrar a Joyce como becario. Joyce declararía siempre deber a sus educadores jesuitas el entrenamiento en “reunir un material, ordenarlo y presentarlo”: de hecho, para bien o para mal, lo que recibió de los jesuitas fue tan vasto y complejo, que no sería arbitrario decir que la obra joyceana es la gran contribución —involuntaria, y aun como tiro salido por la culata— de la Compañía de Jesús a la literatura universal. Y no pensamos ahora en la crisis de fe y la problemática moral, entretejida con disquisiciones sobre el pensamiento estético de Santo Tomás de Aquino, en Autorretrato: ateniéndonos a Ulises, aparte de la inmensa masa de material teológico y litúrgico que utiliza Joyce sin el menor compromiso religioso ni antirreligioso, cabría decir que se trata de un examen de conciencia al modo jesuítico, llevado hasta el último extremo, sólo que, claro está, sin “dolor de corazón” ni “propósito de enmienda”. Pues el más típico examen de conciencia jesuítico es —como Ulises— el repaso de un día, al terminarlo, asumiendo uno mismo la acusación y la defensa —si, por un lado, con exhaustivo rigor, por otro lado, con flexibilidad casuística, atendiendo a atenuantes—, pero no la valoración ni el juicio —que se dejan “tal como esté en la presencia de Dios”—: es decir, obteniendo el “relato” como cabría decirlo ante un confesor, proceso tan literario como psicológico. Conviene dejar al menos insinuado este tema, porque empieza a resultar un poco añejo ya, incluso para católicos, después del Concilio Vaticano II, y con la actual crisis de los jesuitas como pedagogos por excelencia del catolicismo.

Los jesuitas de Belvedere, aplaudiendo a su escolar James Joyce por su brillantez retórica y literaria, y sin llegar a darse cuenta, al final, de su radical
crisis de fe y moral, contribuyeron a que su padre, aunque rodando por una pendiente de sucesivos desastres económicos, enviara a James al college católico de la Universidad de Dublín (University College), cuyo primer rector había sido el Cardenal Newman —para Joyce, el mejor prosista inglés— y donde había enseñado lenguas clásicas aquel jesuita Hopkins que después de su muerte sería conocido como gran poeta. En 1902 llegó a ser Joyce Bachelor of Arts —“Licenciado en Letras” diríamos aproximadamente—, y, flanqueado por su brillante hermano Stanislaus —también hombre literario, luego eficaz ayudador en su vida práctica, y, tras la muerte de James, autor de un libro de memorias My Brother’s Keeper—, empezó a tomar parte, con polémica arrogancia, en la vida literaria dublinesa. Su primera publicación, en una revista londinense, fue un elogio a Ibsen, escándalo de la época (aprendería el dano–noruego para leerle mejor, como Unamuno): además, atacó el nacionalismo, para él de vía estrecha, del Irish National Theatre, la más sagrada de las vacas del movimiento nacionalista irlandés. Ya licenciado en Artes, Joyce sondea vagamente otras carreras más prácticas: elige estudiar medicina, pero, significativamente, no en la facultad dublinesa, sino en París, a donde se traslada en otoño de 1902. Fracaso y regreso son inmediatos: vuelve, sin embargo, a París, a fines de 1902, con el proyecto de vivir de corresponsalías y colaboraciones, así como de clases particulares: de hecho, la mayor parte de su tiempo se repartió entre lecturas literarias en la biblioteca Sainte–Geneviève y las visitas a lugares menos santos
—de todo lo cual hay frecuentes ecos en Ulises. Un telegrama le hace volver junto a su madre, que muere en agosto de 1903, de cáncer de hígado ([1]).

En 1904 entra Joyce en su anno mirabili; el 7 de enero escribe un largo ensayo autobiográfico, A Portrait of the Artist, que, al no poder publicar, convierte en algo con pretensiones de novela, Stephen Hero, a su vez transformado en el Retrato propiamente dicho —el episodio final de Stephen Hero, eliminado en esta metamorfosis, será reabsorbido en el comienzo de Ulises. Además, Joyce escribe entonces numerosas poesías —luego incluidas en el librito Chamber Music—, publica Las hermanas, primera de las estampas de Dublineses, y, sobre todo, conoce por la calle a una criada de hotel, que va a ser la compañera de su vida: Nora Barnacle (y si el nombre Nora era ibseniano, resulta muy joyceano que barnacle sea ‘lapa’ y ‘percebe’, buenos símbolos de la adhesión fidelísima y paciente con que aquella inculta e importante mujer supo siempre aguantar y ayudar a su difícil compañero, cuya obra no leyó jamás). James Joyce pone pronto a prueba a su amada dándole la imagen más intranquilizadora de sí mismo, en una carta: …conviene que conozcas mi ánimo en la mayor parte de las cosas. Mi ánimo rechaza todo el presente orden social y el cristianismo —el hogar, las virtudes reconocidas, las clases en la vida y las doctrinas religiosas. ¿Cómo podría gustarme la idea del hogar? Mi hogar ha sido simplemente un asunto de clase media echado a perder por hábitos de derroche que he heredado. A mi madre la mataron lentamente los malos tratos de mi padre, años de dificultades, y la franqueza cínica de mi conducta. Cuando le miré a la cara, tendida en el ataúd —una cara gris, consumida por el cáncer—, comprendí
que miraba la cara de una víctima y maldije el sistema que la había hecho ser víctima. Éramos diecisiete en la familia. Mis hermanos y hermanas no son nada para mí. Sólo un hermano [Stanislaus] es capaz de comprenderme. Hace seis años dejé la Iglesia Católica odiándola con el mayor fervor. encontraba imposible para mí seguir en ella a causa de los impulsos de mi naturaleza. Le hice la guerra en secreto cuando era estudiante y rehusé
aceptar las posiciones que me ofrecía. Con eso, me he hecho un mendigo, pero he conservado mi orgullo. Ahora le hago la guerra abiertamente con lo que escribo y digo y hago. No puedo entrar en el orden social sino como vagabundo. He empezado a estudiar medicina tres veces, derecho una vez, música una vez. Hace una semana estaba arreglando marcharme como actor ambulante. No pude poner energía en el plan porque no dejabas de tirarme del codo… (Es curioso que el rompimiento de Joyce con el catolicismo se planteara a nivel meramente ético —y aun biológico— y no doctrinal: luego, en la época de Ulises, Joyce será fríamente neutral ante lo cristiano y lo religioso en general, sólo atento a usarlo a efectos de lenguaje —y, por un malentendido estético e intelectual, concediendo siempre preferencia al catolicismo, “absurdo coherente”, sobre el protestantismo, “absurdo incoherente”. En otro orden de convicciones, Joyce se consideró inicialmente socialista —y no sólo por esperanzas de un Estado que subvencionara a escritores y artistas—: luego perdió todo interés por lo político —en [17], a través de Bloom, su interés por las mejoras de la sociedad estará enfriado por la convicción de que la humanidad siempre lo echará a perder todo con sus tonterías, “vanidad de vanidad”.) Pero cerremos este paréntesis y volvamos a la primavera de 1904: la carta que citábamos es del 29 de agosto: el 16 de junio había sido la primera vez que James y Nora salieron a dar un paseo nocturno, y ésa sería la fecha del día de Ulises —Bloomsday, se le suele llamar, a la vez como alusión al protagonista, señor Bloom, y al Doomsday, Día del Juicio—; fecha conmemorada hoy día por algunos joyceanos con ritos tales como comer un riñón de cerdo con el desayuno de té y tostadas ([4]).

Sin embargo, en “reorganización retrospectiva” —frase también dilecta en Ulises—, Joyce trasladará a esa fecha algo que de hecho ocurrió en septiembre, y que, adscrito a la personalidad de Stephen Dedalus, forma el episodio inicial de Ulises: con su amigo el estudiante de medicina y alevín literario Oliver St. John Gogarty (en Ulises, Buck Mulligan) y un estudiante inglés interesado en la lengua y las tradiciones irlandesas (Trench: Haines en el libro), se instaló, cerca de Dublín, en una de las torres llamadas “Martello”, fortificaciones cilíndricas construidas en 1804, en número de varios centenares, por las costas británicas, contra posibles desembarcos napoleónicos, y entonces, un siglo después, cedidas en barato alquiler a quien
tuviera la humorada de meterse en tales construcciones. Por lo que se puede ver en [1], la idea de los jóvenes era establecer en esa redonda morada el ómphalos, el ombligo de una gestación cultural, una helenización de Irlanda con signo anticasticista. Pero la convivencia no duró más que una semana, y, según se alude en el libro, terminó literalmente a tiros, dirigidos contra unas cacerolas que colgaban sobre la cabecera de Joyce. Gogarty fue luego importante médico y ocasional escritor —autor subterráneo de poesías irreverentes y/u obscenas, como la “Balada del Jovial Jesús”, algunas de cuyas estrofas vemos recitar a Buck Mulligan en [1]: en Ulises, además de propenso al humor impío, aparece como el Judas traidor a Stephen Dedalus —a quien deja a la intemperie, sin llave ni posibilidades de volver a la torre Martello, después de pelearse a puñetazos con él, en episodio no presentado directamente en Ulises, pero aludido en [15] y [16]. En la vida real, Joyce atribuyó a instigaciones de Gogarty cierto episodio posterior, uno de los más amargos de su vida: la calumniosa pretensión de cierto común amigo de haber disfrutado de los favores de Nora mientras ésta empezaba a salir con Joyce. Su vendetta literaria contra Gogarty fue eternizarle en forma de Buck Mulligan. Pero, volviendo a junio de 1904, seis días después de su primer paseo con Nora, y al parecer todavía sin ánimo de guardarle a ésta, fidelidad corporal, Joyce tuvo otra aventura nocturna cargada de porvenir: al dirigirse a una muchacha —“en vocativo femenino”, dirá en [15]— su miopía no le dejó advertir que iba seguida por un acompañante militar, que le derribó de un puñetazo. De su desplome le ayudó a salir —“de la manera más ortodoxamente samaritana” [16]— cierto judío famoso por las infidelidades de su mujer. Más adelante, Joyce, estando en Roma, como empleado bancario, entre julio de 1906 y febrero de 1907, pensó utilizar este episodio para una nueva estampa de la serie Dublineses, bajo el título Ulises: un noctámbulo, vagabundo como Ulises, vuelve a su Ítaca doméstica con ayuda de un judío. La tentación de la caricatura cultural y literaria era muy fuerte: el Judío Errante se hermana con el Griego Navegante para salvarle y restituirle a su ómphalos: la síntesis cultural judeo– helénica, etc. etc. Pero quizá ese mismo título, Ulises, sacaba el proyectado relato fuera del punto de vista inmediato y directo de Dublineses: el hecho es que Joyce lo dejó en su memoria hasta que se convirtió en el germen de su libro, donde se sitúa hacia el final de [15].

En septiembre de 1904, James Joyce, desahuciado de la torre Martello, peleado con los devotos del renacimiento cultural irlandés, y terriblemente —
pero aun castamente— apasionado por Nora, decidió marcharse de Irlanda de cualquier modo, llevándose sólo a su amada. Por un anuncio de un agente, creyó encontrar un empleo enseñando inglés en la Berlitz School de Zürich, a donde llegó, con la ya definitiva compañía de Nora, sin preocuparse de formalizaciones matrimoniales —que no tendrían lugar hasta 1931, siendo ya mayores sus dos hijos, el bajo cantante Giorgio y la artista demente Lucia. Llegados a Zürich, resultó que no había tal empleo: sí lo había, en cambio, en la Berlitz School de Pola, la ciudad adriática entonces austrohúngara, luego italiana, hoy yugoslava. Poco después, Joyce mejoró ligeramente pasando a la cercana Trieste, donde también fue a enseñar su ayudador hermano Stanislaus —y una hermana, que se casó con un banquero austríaco. Por suerte, James Joyce, siempre gran lingüista, hablaba ya fluidamente el italiano, aprendido por gusto con un jesuita en Dublín: un elemento más de su gradual apego a Trieste. El italiano fue el idioma de la familia Joyce, incluso cuando se trasladaron luego a Zürich y a París: en italiano serían las desesperadas conversaciones de Joyce con su hija Lucia cuando ésta fue hundiéndose, en Francia, en una progresiva demencia a la que quizá contribuyeron su atmósfera de desarraigo, su identificación con su padre y la bizquera que estropeaba su belleza —alguien habla, pero no parece comprobado, de una tragedia sentimental, un fracasado amor, en París, por el gran discípulo de su padre, Samuel Beckett. En Trieste, Joyce se encontró en gran estrechez económica: mientras tanto, su lanzamiento editorial tropieza con dificultades: Dublineses había sido aceptado por un editor de Londres, pero no se publica por diversos tabús —miedo a reacciones locales, puritanismos británicos, y sobre todo, temor por algunas alusiones a la realeza. En 1912 son quemados sus ejemplares ya impresos, y no saldrá hasta 1914, con otro editor. Mientras tanto, en 1905, ha nacido su hijo, Giorgio. Entre 1906 y 1907, según se indicó, Joyce intentó consolidar su posición trabajando en un banco en Roma, pero le ahogaba el empleo oficinesco, y volvió a su ya imprescindible Trieste, donde, ese mismo año 1907, nació su hija Lucia, en el pabellón de pobres del hospital, mientras Joyce estaba gravemente enfermo con fiebres reumáticas —tal vez por infecciones dentales que, con su afición constante al alcohol, contribuyeron al mal estado de sus ojos, a la larga, casi ceguera. También en 1907 se publica en Londres la primera colección de versos de Joyce, Chamber Music, no sin vacilaciones de última hora del autor, que se da cuenta de lo atrasadas que quedan esas poesías al lado de sus empeños narrativos de entonces.

Entre 1909 y 1912, Joyce hace tres viajes a Irlanda, uno de ellos con un proyecto práctico digno del señor Bloom, pero que efectivamente hubiera podido sacarle de su pobreza: establecer una sala de cine, la primera de Dublín —Cine Volta—, un buen negocio si Joyce se hubiera quedado atendiéndolo en Dublín. Pero regresó a Trieste, donde, en 1912, la familia Joyce se habría visto puesta de patitas en la calle de no ser por los préstamos del buen hermano Stanislaus. Algo mejora luego la posición de Joyce al obtener una cátedra de inglés en la escuela comercial Revoltella —que, después de la guerra, sería parte de la Universidad de Trieste, my revolver University, diría Joyce, jugando con rivoltella, “revólver”. También publica algunos artículos sobre la cuestión irlandesa en el periódico local Il Piccolo, escritos en su atildadísimo italiano, y da varias conferencias públicas —notables las dedicadas a su predilecto Daniel Defoe, y a Blake. También da clases particulares, a veces a alumnos de gran categoría personal: así, a un gran industrial judío, Ettore Schmitz, al cual y a su mujer —que luego sería la Anna Silvia Plurabelle de Finnegans Wake—, les leyó un día Joyce el relato final de Dublineses. Schmitz, impresionado por la calidad literaria de su mercante di gerundi, como le llamaba, le confió que había publicado hacía tiempo dos novelas que no habían tenido ningún eco, Una vita y Senilità, bajo el seudónimo —el lector ya habrá caído en la cuenta— de Italo Svevo. Joyce, después de leerlas, citó de memoria con elogio algunos pasajes, afirmando que ni el mismo Anatole France los mejoraría. Schmitz, estimulado,
volvió al ejercicio de la literatura, publicando unos años después La coscienza di Zeno, que Joyce, entonces en París, hizo leer a su propio “lanzador”, Valéry Larbaud, obteniendo el aplauso no sólo de éste, sino, a través de éste, de Eugenio Montale, con lo que Italo Svevo empezó a contar para la conciencia literaria italiana.

Otro hecho, al que acabamos de aludir, iba tomando creciente importancia en la vida de Joyce: desde siempre dado a la bebida, como buen dublinés,
adopta el vino como recurso y evasión —no sin discriminar y matizar en sus calidades, aparte de preferirlo como elemento de la buena mesa, cuyos placeres compartía con Nora, también de apetito realmente homérico. A Joyce no le gustaba el vino tinto —“bistec licuefacto”, le llamaba—, sino el blanco —“electricidad”, según él—, procurando ser fiel a alguna determinada especie local: en Zürich elegiría, para su monogamia alcohólica cierto Fendant de Sion, con vago saborcillo a mineral metálico, en alemán Erz, que él extendió a Erzherzogin (‘archiduquesa’) para dar una interpretación de su color a tono con el Ulises en que trabajaba, y siguiendo la sugerencia de un amigo italiano: “Sí, è pipí, ma è pipí di arciduchessa”. Por desgracia, el alcohol dañaba a Joyce en su punto débil, los ojos, afectos de varios trastornos que, a pesar de diez delicadísimas operaciones durante los veinte años siguientes, le dejarían casi ciego. Cierto que parecía haber en ello algo de predestinación —kismet, diría el señor Bloom—: Joyce era poco visual y muy musical, con una excelente voz de tenor, probada con éxito en conciertos, y literariamente pendiente siempre del oído —en Ulises, piénsese sobre todo en [11]—, mientras que sobre pintura se conservan muy pocas, aunque buenas, observaciones suyas, a la vez que su sentido óptico de la tipografía y la
corrección de pruebas era desastroso. Incluso, hay quizá siempre cierta torpeza en la descripción joyceana de movimientos, desplazamientos y referencias en el espacio: por ejemplo, en el comienzo de Ulises, quizá sea eso uno de los factores que lo hacen ser el punto más débil y oscuro de todo el libro. 1914 es el año literariamente decisivo para James Joyce, no tanto porque al fin se publique Dublineses, cuanto por la aparición en su horizonte de un providencial agente literario: Ezra Pound. El poeta exilado americano, entonces secretario de W. B. Yeats en Londres, desarrollaba su especial talento de buscador de talentos, procurando colaboraciones para revistas inglesas y norteamericanas. Al invitar a Joyce, por sugerencia de Yeats, a que enviara algo para la londinense The Egoist, aquél le envía parte del Retrato del artista, que, desde el número de febrero, va apareciendo, hasta su totalidad, en entregas mensuales: desde entonces, Joyce se siente alguien en la auténtica sociedad literaria, gracias a ese “cónsul general” que era Pound. Termina así el Retrato, bajo el estimulante apremio de los plazos fijos, después que, en un momento de desánimo, había tirado el manuscrito al fuego, de donde lo salvó su hermana. Al utilizar para el Retrato ese borrador que había sido Stephen Hero, deja fuera —como ya dijimos— su episodio final: ahora, publicado el Retrato, lo convertirá en la primera secuencia de lo que será Ulises ([1]–[3]). El estirón de la estatura literaria de Joyce es notable, pero, increíblemente, en ese punto, en vez de seguir adelante, se echa atrás una temporada para escribir un opaco dramón neoibseniano ventilando pleitos personales, Exiliados. Con todo, es como si así soltara lastre muerto: a partir de ahí, combina la nueva andadura de Stephen
Dedalus con la vieja idea de un Ulises asistido por un judío–samaritano —sólo que ahora el judío se vuelve uliseico él mismo. Y no está solo Pound —il signor Sterlina, traduce su protegido— en asistir a Joyce: la editora de The Egoist, Harriet Shaw Weaver, fascinada por la genialidad del Retrato, se convierte en ángel custodio de Joyce, mucho tiempo a distancia y a menudo en secreto, mientras duran los años de gestación y lanzamiento de Ulises. Entre tanto, precisamente cuando Joyce se está entregando con energía a su gran creación, estalla la Primera Guerra Europea —la “Gran” Guerra—, que, en su ánimo, le deja indiferente: después, preguntado cómo se las había arreglado durante ese tiempo, se limitaría a exclamar con indolencia: “Ah sí, he oído decir que ha habido una guerra por ahí”. Pero, materialmente, la guerra termina con su trabajo y su residencia en Trieste, ciudad entonces austrohúngara, donde Joyce era, pues, ciudadano de país enemigo. Su hermano Stanislaus, soltero y más joven y más político, es internado en un campo de concentración, mientras que James, padre de familia y militarmente inútil por su mala vista, puede pasar con los suyos a la neutral Suiza, sin más que dar su palabra de honor de que no actuaría por la causa militar aliada. Y bien dispuesto estaba el antimilitarista Joyce a guardar esa palabra, pero, de modo pacífico, no se negó a contribuir al prestigio cultural británico en Zürich apoyando un grupo dramático inglés donde actuó su mujer
—para terminar en seguida peleándose con el cónsul británico por un motivo trivial. Zürich, centro del oasis suizo entre países combatientes, hervía de espías y de figuras variopintas: en el café Pfauen, Joyce conoció fugazmente a aquel revolucionario ruso, Vladímir Uliánov, que, cuando ya no esperaba nada, se vio invitado a volver a su patria por los alemanes, con la maquiavélica esperanza de que fomentaría el desorden en la retaguardia zarista —y era Lenin, claro. En cambio, no llegó a conocer —cartas cantan— a aquel desertor alemán, Hugo Ball, que compró el Cabaret Voltaire para dar espectáculos literarios en colaboración con un poeta rumano, Tristan Tzara, francés de lengua adoptada —y ahí nació Dada. Algunos se sentirían tentados a imaginar contactos entre el dadaísmo y el que entonces escribía Ulises, pero no creemos que a éste le hubiera podido interesar aquel movimiento, pues Ulises contiene de sobra, sólo que en forma “aplicada”, como elemento de un relato coherente, todo lo que el dadaísmo quiso aislar en forma químicamente pura.

Desde junio de 1915 hasta octubre de 1919, la familia Joyce residió en Zürich —hay un vago episodio sentimental sin materializar, con una tal Martha
Fleischmann (Martha será la corresponsal pseudónima de Bloom en Ulises). En 1916 se publica el Retrato en forma de libro en Nueva York (un año después, en Londres); en 1918, también en ambas orillas, la obra teatral Exiliados. Joyce, en Zürich, vive absorto en su creciente obra: cuanto pasa o se dice en su horizonte encuentra o no resonancia en su ánimo según que pueda insertarse en el complejo tejido de su libro. Los numerosos amigos judíos y griegos que hace entonces no imaginaban que estaban sirviendo de materia para su trabajo. A veces, se le va una jornada entera de labor en determinar el mejor orden de las palabras en sólo dos frases —pensamos en Flaubert, maestro de Joyce no sólo en esto, sino en su fascinación por las tonterías del lenguaje corriente y las pedanterías de los hombres vulgares: como señalaría Pound, el señor Bloom tiene mucho de Bouvard y Pécuchet, a la vez que de autocaricatura de Joyce, y ahí —y eso ya lo señalamos nosotros— radica el problema de la verosimilitud psicológica de Bloom, demasiado rico en el material verbal de su pensamiento para poder ser, sin más, ese señorín semiculto de opiniones risibles. Cada episodio surgía en torno a un término de referencia a la Odisea —que se indicará luego, en resumen—: referencia a veces muy remota, y, a menudo, con algo de private joke, de chiste que sólo entiende el que lo hace, si no da especial información al contarlo. Más importante que ese andamiaje es el hecho de que cada episodio tenga una técnica y una voz diferentes —si se quiere, “un punto de vista” diferente. De hecho, algunos de los dieciocho capítulos tienen más de una voz, bien sea sucesivamente [13], bien sea en alternancia [12]. Por lo que toca al “punto de vista”, hay capítulos —los menos— en que el señor
Bloom aparece visto —o entrevisto fugazmente— desde alguna otra persona, o desde un narrador impersonal: más frecuente es que el relato incluya —o aun tenga como base— el proceso mental del señor Bloom en su verbalización básica, sin necesidad de hacer explícitas las conexiones lógicas ni explicar las referencias. Esto es lo que suele designarse con el término de Henry James “corriente de conciencia”, y lo que llamó Valéry Larbaud, al presentar Ulises, “monólogo interior”: el propio Joyce lo llamó “palabra interior” al declararse deudor de tal técnica a la olvidada novela de Edouard Dujardin Les lauriers sont coupés —recientemente traducida en España. Quizá silenciaba James Joyce hasta qué punto debía esa técnica a su hermano Stanislaus, quien, en un esbozo psicológico–narrativo, intentó imitar el monólogo interior de un moribundo tal como se lo había sugerido Tolstoi en el personaje Praskujin de los Apuntes de Sebastopol. En todo caso, Joyce sacó así de su olvido a Dujardin: ya antes de publicarse Ulises, en 1921, Valéry Larbaud imitó esa técnica en sus Amants, heureux amants, señalando debérsela a Dujardin, a través de Joyce, en su prólogo a la reedición de Les lauriers en 1924. Dujardin dedicó esta reedición a Joyce como milagroso autor de su resurrección literaria; y, en efecto, no sólo escribió otra posterior novela, sino que se hizo teórico de su técnica (en 1931 publicó un libro titulado Le monologue interior). Por su parte, Joyce, cuando aparece la
traducción francesa de Ulises, envía un ejemplar a Dujardin así dedicado: “A E.D., annonciateur de la parole intérieure. Le larron impénitent, James Joyce”.

A finales de 1917, Joyce creía tener ya una gran parte del libro —tal vez, sin embargo, no sería ni la mitad del resultado final, que no preveía tan largo—:
entonces pensó en ir publicando ya lo escrito, en forma serial, tal vez como manera de estimularse y obligarse a sí mismo a llevar la novela, a plazo fijo, a un término que todavía no veía muy claro. Naturalmente, Joyce brindó la publicación a Harriet Shaw Weaver, en The Egoist, donde había aparecido el
Retrato. Pero aquí se iba a plantear más agudamente el problema que ya había previsto Joyce cuando trabajaba en el Retrato, según escribió a Stanislaus: «Lo que escribo con las intenciones más lúgubres, será considerado como obsceno». El puritanismo anglosajón no podía —entonces— admitir la franqueza absoluta de la obra joyceana, que anota todas las tonterías e indecencias que pudieran írseles pasando por las mentes a sus criaturas narrativas. Probablemente una tradición católica —y aún más si jesuítica, como la de Joyce— da ciertas facilidades para semejante franqueza de cinismo total —que, en definitiva, es también franqueza para con nosotros mismos, en cuanto que reconocemos que nuestra mente tiene no poco de semejante con cualquier mente que se destape—: y no sólo por la costumbre de la confesión, con su examen previo, incluso de pensamientos, sino por la conciencia de que siempre estamos pasando de justos a pecadores y viceversa, por lo que no importa demasiado reconocer las propias faltas y vicios, y, en concreto, la tendencia de nuestro pensamiento a la deriva, en su impunidad solitaria, a pararse en lo que no debe. Como ya dijo el vulgo, o sea Campoamor, la vida es pecar, hacer penitencia, y luego vuelta a empezar.

Basta que la muerte no sea “supitaña” y deje un momento para el trámite final, pues, como dijo Don Juan Tenorio, un punto de contrición da al alma la salvación. (Los italianos saben llegar aún más lejos que los españoles en el uso de la autoacusación como hábil coartada: «Sono un porco!» grita Aldo Fabrizi en el final de Prima Communione, y queda, así como un señor, dispuesto a recomenzar sus pequeñas porquerías.) En cambio, en la tradición calvinista puritana, con su intenso sentido de predestinación, entre los “santos” y los que se van a condenar, resulta más escandaloso semejante destape total de la conciencia, porque, a ese nivel básico, en la “palabra interior”, el lector puede desconfiar de pertenecer a los “santos” al descubrirse tan parecido en su mecanismo mental a los personajes literarios —por más que procure reprimir y limpiar su pensamiento—: Hyppocrite lecteur, mon semblable, mon frère! Para la publicación de la obra joyceana —lo mismo en Inglaterra que en los Estados Unidos— las barreras eran múltiples y temibles (hablamos en pretérito porque, aunque tal vez las leyes sigan siendo las mismas, hoy no se suele pensar en los países anglosajones que un libro tenga el menor efecto en la moral pública). Ante todo, la acusación de obscenidad se juzgaba referida a pasajes, e incluso frases, e incluso palabras sueltas, sin poder apelar al contexto —criterio éste según el cual la Biblia debería estar prohibida, al menos en su Antiguo Testamento. Además, los impresores eran los primeros responsables de toda posible indecencia, sin poder descargarse en editores o autores. Después venían
—y vienen, con toda actualidad— las autoridades postales, que, de hecho, funcionan como censura gubernativa, con atentos lectores y activos hornos
crematorios, en cuestiones de obscenidad y de subversión política. Y, por encima de todo, la autoridad judicial, dispuesta a actuar a requerimiento de
individuos o sociedades dedicadas a la persecución de la indecencia. Harriet Shaw Weaver, despreciando su propio riesgo, hubo de pasar un
año buscando tipógrafo, hasta que encontró uno que se atrevió a imprimir —y eso con algunos cortes— los capítulos [2], [3], [6] y [10]. (El matrimonio
Virginia–Leonard Woolf rechazó la oferta de ser coeditores e impresores, en su prensa de mano de la Hogarth Press.) Para entonces, Joyce, impaciente, ya había recurrido a Ezra Pound, con la esperanza de hallar más libertad en Estados Unidos. Pound envió los tres primeros capítulos a la Little Review, nacida en Chicago en 1914 y recién trasladada a Nueva York, bajo la inspiración de Margaret Anderson, quien, apenas leyó el primer párrafo del capítulo [3], dijo “Lo imprimiremos, aunque sea el último esfuerzo de nuestra vida”. Pero tampoco fue fácil encontrar un tipógrafo igualmente entusiasta: al fin, un serbocroata, insensible a los atrevimientos verbales en inglés, se prestó a ello. Lo malo de la publicación por capítulos en la revista era que, si una sola de las entregas era condenada, ya no podría publicarse el libro en su integridad, pero Joyce desoyó el prudente consejo de abandonar la serialización y reservar toda la batalla para el libro entero una vez acabado. Y, en efecto, los censores de Correos, verdaderos Argos de asombrosa capacidad de lectura, no tardaron en caer sobre la minoritaria revistilla, confiscando y quemando los números donde iban los capítulos [8], [9] y [12]. Si el lector observa de cuáles se trata —sobre todo [9] y [12]— se asombrará de tal quema: el caso de [8] es especialmente interesante, porque, aparte de algún vago ensueño erótico de Bloom, lo que escandalizó debió ser la crudeza con que se pinta el acto de comer y beber, amén de las ventosidades finales. Joyce, cuyos inocentes Dublineses ya habían ardido inéditos en su primera edición, comentó: “Es la segunda vez que me queman en este mundo, así que espero pasar por el fuego del purgatorio tan deprisa como mi patrono San Luis Gonzaga”. Pero aún hubo algo peor: el capítulo [13], con exhibicionismo distante de ropa interior de Gerty MacDowell, fue denunciado por la Sociedad para la Prevención del Vicio, de Nueva York, y, a pesar de brillantes defensas de orden literario, fue condenado a multa y abandono de la publicación. Era en 1921: las víctimas tuvieron conciencia de un paralelo con los procesos en que —en un mismo año (1875) y con el mismo fiscal, por cierto, secreto autor de versos pornográficos— fueron condenados Les fleurs du mal y Madame Bovary. Pero la obra de Baudelaire pudo seguir editándose con la exclusión de las pièces condamnées, y la condena de Madame Bovary fue más bien una reprimenda, incluso buena propaganda para las posteriores ventas del libro —con horror de
Flaubert ante tal malentendido.

Quedaba una última posibilidad: París. James Joyce, en 1920, se había instalado en París, con su familia, tras un intento de restablecimiento en
Trieste, y pensando detenerse sólo unos días de camino a Londres. Ezra Pound, ya establecido en París, aconsejó a Joyce asentarse allí, uniéndose así los dos a la multitud de americanos literarios de los años veinte —Hemingway, Faulkner…—, presidida por la exilada de antes de la guerra, Gertrude Stein —quien, por cierto, sentiría luego grandes celos de Joyce, reivindicando su primacía en ciertas invenciones técnicas. El consejo de Pound resultó ser tan sano como todos los suyos —y no sólo con Joyce: es sabido qué bien corrigió a Eliot su Waste Land, precisamente por entonces. En efecto, James Joyce, apenas llegado, conoció a Sylvia Beach, una joven americana que acababa de abrir una librería de lengua inglesa, Shakespeare & Co., a la vuelta de la esquina de la célebre Maison des Amis du Livre, de su amiga Adrienne Monnier. Sylvia Beach, al saber los problemas censoriales de Joyce, empezó a actuar como su propagandista, buscándole el apoyo de la crítica francesa. Ante todo, hizo leer el Retrato a Valéry Larbaud,
comprensivo y abierto a diversas literaturas del mundo —en España, Gabriel Miró y Ramón Gómez de la Serna disfrutaron de su aplauso y su amistad—, aparte de fino creador él mismo —su Fermina Márquez es una de esas novelas menores que no se olvidan. Larbaud, impresionado por el Retrato, quiso conocer al autor, lo cual organizó hábilmente Sylvia Beach en una fiesta navideña, cantando carols en cordial reunión: allí, Larbaud pidió los capítulos de Ulises ya aparecidos en revista. Apenas recibidos, escribió a Sylvia Beach: “Estoy leyendo Ulises. En realidad, no puedo leer otra cosa, no puedo ni pensar en otra cosa”. Acabada la lectura, una semana después, volvía a escribir: “Estoy loco delirante por Ulises. Desde que leí a Whitman, a mis 18 años, ningún libro me ha entusiasmado tanto… ¡Es prodigioso! Tan grande como Rabelais: el señor Bloom es inmortal como Falstaff”. Y se puso a traducir unos fragmentos para la Nouvelle Revue Française. Esto ocurría un poco antes de la condena judicial en Nueva York: al producirse ésta, Sylvia Beach decidió editar ella misma Ulises en París, tarea a la que iba a dedicar sus próximos años, bien absorbidos por las exigencias y meticulosidades de Joyce: el rechazo judicial angloamericano contrastaba con la devoción sin límites de aquella mujer —devoción a Ulises, no a todo lo de su autor sin discriminación: cuando conoció Finnegans Wake lo definió sarcásticamente con un juego de palabras también muy joyceano, como a
Wholesale Safety–Pun Factory, con alusión a safety–pin: “una fábrica de juegos de palabras de seguridad [imperdibles] al por mayor”. Para ayudar a la
financiación del libro, se buscaron mil suscriptores de una primera edición de lujo, cuya lista incluía nombres tan curiosos como el de Winston Churchill. En cambio, Bernard Shaw, después de contestar a la petición haciendo un gran elogio de lo que había leído de Joyce, concluía: “Pero no conoce usted lo que es un irlandés, y de edad, si cree que está dispuesto a pagar 150 francos por un libro”. La impresión se anunciaba compleja —ya la copia a máquina había sido épica: Joyce empezó por pedir seis juegos de pruebas, en todos los cuales se lanzó a hacer añadidos y correcciones que a menudo extraviaba y enredaba, también por culpa de su vista, cada vez peor. (Todavía en 1975 no se dispone de un texto de Ulises limpio de errores: hay noticias de que se prepara para antes de 1980, ¡en Alemania!) Además, el impresor de Sylvia Beach, Darantière, estaba en Dijon, con los consiguientes enredos de envíos y comunicaciones. Y lo más curioso es que, a todo esto, el libro no estaba terminado: Joyce tenía aún pendiente mucho trabajo en los capítulos finales mientras corregía pruebas de los primeros. Y, para acabar de complicar, Joyce estaba empeñado en que el libro saliera el día que él cumplía cuarenta años —y ya adelantamos que lo consiguió: gracias al maquinista del tren de Dijon, pudo festejar su cumpleaños con un ejemplar de esa edición, para cuya cubierta se había ido ensayando cuidadosamente el color hasta lograr el azul que, como fondo de la tipografía en blanco, representaba para Joyce lo griego —mar y espuma, y la bandera griega—, así como, quizá, la ropa interior de Gerty MacDowell en [13]. Las reediciones se fueron sucediendo con frecuencia y regularidad. Empezó entonces la ridícula historia de los intentos de introducir Ulises en los países de lengua inglesa —aparte de los ejemplares contrabandeados por turistas o filtrados por correo. Harriet Shaw Weaver, invocando contratos previos con Joyce, se puso de acuerdo con Shakespeare & Co. para que la segunda y sucesivas ediciones llevaran el sello de The Egoist Press, aunque inevitablemente impresas en Francia: de los 2000 ejemplares de la segunda, se envían a Nueva York 500, confiando en el país de la libertad, pero son quemados todos: la tercera edición consta de 500 ejemplares, enviados a Inglaterra y confiscados —todos menos uno— por los aduaneros. Las ediciones 4ª a 12ª vuelven a tener el sello de Shakespeare & Co.: en 1932, una firma surgida en Hamburgo bajo el apropiado nombre The Odyssey Press se hace cargo del libro —de la 13ª edición, en dos volúmenes, impresa en Leipzig, es nuestro ejemplar. A todo esto, en 1926, un editor poco escrupuloso de Nueva York lleva a cabo la ocurrencia de editar Ulises, jurídicamente mostrenco, en entregas mensuales de una revista, suprimiendo todo lo que pudiera ofender los castos ojos postales. Se organiza una protesta firmada por escritores de diversos países —muchos de los cuales, sin duda, no habían leído el libro; así, Unamuno.

Comienzan también las traducciones, ante todo la alemana, luego la francesa, de compleja elaboración en grupo (“traduction d’Auguste Morel revue par
Valéry Larbaud, Stuart Gilbert et l’auteur”), que, a fuerza de argot, exagera y aun desvía el sentido del estilo original; la checa; dos japonesas en 1930 —año en que sale el libro de Stuart Gilbert, James Joyce’s “Ulysses” en que cita abundantemente el prohibido texto, ensalzándolo como obra maestra. Poco a poco, la situación parece madura para una prueba legal en los tribunales norteamericanos, que se provoca en 1933 enviando un ejemplar por correo y avisando a las autoridades para que lo confisquen. El juez neoyorquino de la causa, J. M. Woolsey, admitió el libro en un veredicto con coartadas de buena gracia literaria: “Respecto a las repetidas emersiones del tema sexual en las mentes de los personajes, debe recordarse siempre que el ambiente era céltico y su estación la primavera”. Y añadía “Me doy cuenta sobradamente de que, debido a ciertas escenas, Ulises es un trago más bien fuerte para pedir que lo tomen ciertas personas sensitivas, aunque normales. Pero mi meditada opinión, tras larga reflexión, es que, si bien en diversos pasajes el efecto de Ulises en el lector es sin duda un tanto emético [vomitivo], en ningún lugar tiende a ser afrodisíaco”. Random House lanza entonces rápidamente el libro: en vano la autoridad fiscal lleva el asunto a un tribunal superior, cuya mayoría también admite el libro.

Todavía hubo que esperar a otoño de 1936 para que Inglaterra permitiera la edición del libro proscrito (y es curioso que su entusiástico admirador T. S.
Eliot, por miedo, perdiera la oportunidad de que lo sacara la editorial de que él era asesor). No es mera curiosidad retrospectiva señalar, con forzosa brevedad, cómo se fue viendo y enjuiciando Ulises. Y es ésta una historia que, significativamente, empieza antes incluso de la publicación del libro: ya Valéry Larbaud lo anunció en París, en resonante conferencia de diciembre de 1921 —recogida en la Nouvelle Revue Française de abril siguiente, junto con la traducción de un fragmento—, bajo la óptica de la referencia a la Odisea, clave comunicada por el propio autor a Larbaud, pero que el lector no encuentra en el libro, salvo en el título. En cambio, los primeros críticos ingleses, libres del esquema Odisea, fueron más al grano —y es de notar que recensionaban un libro de publicación prohibida en su propio país, auténtica propaganda de una mercancía de contrabando. Ya antes de la aparición de Ulises, en abril de 1921, basándose sólo en los capítulos publicados en la Little Review, R. Aldington, en English Review, había preludiado, a elegante altura, el general conflicto de sentimientos de la crítica británica —admiración literaria, susto ante la total franqueza sin tapujos—: …cuando el Sr. Joyce, con sus dones maravillosos, los usa para darnos asco de la humanidad, hace algo que es falso y calumnioso para la humanidad… Ha logrado escribir un libro muy notable, pero desde el punto de vista de la vida humana, estoy seguro de que está equivocado. Y el crítico se asusta de pensar lo que serán los imitadores de Joyce: Él produce asco con una razón; otros producirán asco sin razón. Él es oscuro y justifica su oscuridad, pero ¿cuántos otros escribirán mera confusión pensando que es sublime?… Él no es uno de esos superficiales que adoptan un artificio superficial como canon de una nueva forma de arte; él caerá en manos de las capillitas, pero él mismo está muy por encima de ellas…

La primera recensión periodística (S. B. Mais, Daily Express, 25 marzo 1922) pone el dedo en la llaga: …La mayor parte de los escritores jóvenes desafían las reticencias convencionales en cuanto que describen todo lo que la mayor parte de nosotros hacemos y decimos. Mr. Joyce va mucho más lejos: de sus páginas saltan hacia nosotros todos nuestros más secretos e inconvenientes pensamientos íntimos. Incluso un recensionador anónimo (Evening News, 8 abril 1922) sabe mirar de frente Ulises: Mr. Joyce es tan cruel e inexorable como Zola con la pobre humanidad. Su estilo está en la nueva vena cinematográfica a la moda, muy sacudido y elíptico. El primer estudio realmente importante es el de J. Middleton Murry (Nation and Atheneum, 22 abril 1922), quien, después de dejar a un lado las objeciones moralistas (“la cabeza que sea bastante fuerte como para leer Ulises no se dejará trastornar por él”), apunta a algo literariamente esencial en el libro: su naturaleza humorística: Esta bufonería trascendental, esta súbita irrupción de la vis comica en un mundo donde se encarna la trágica incompatibilidad de lo práctico y lo instintivo, es un logro muy grande. Ese es el centro vital del libro de Mr. Joyce, y la intensidad de vida que contiene basta para animar su totalidad… Especial agudeza mostró también la recensión de Holbrook Jackson (To-Day, junio 1922): [Ulises] es un insulto y un logro. No es indecente. No hay en él una sola línea sucia. Sencillamente está desnudo… No es ni moral ni inmoral. Mr. Joyce escribe, no como si la moral no hubiera existido nunca, sino como quien deliberadamente prescinde de códigos y convenciones morales. Una franqueza como la suya habría sido imposible si no hubiera estado prohibida tal franqueza… Él es el primer narrador no–romántico, pues, al fin y al cabo, los realistas no eran más que románticos que trataban de liberarse del medievalismo… No pretende divertir, como George Moore,… ni criticar, como Meredith, ni satirizar, como Swift. Sencillamente, anota, como Homero, o incluso Froissart. Esta actitud tiene sus peligros. Mr. Joyce se ha enfrentado con ellos, o, mejor dicho, ha hecho como si no existieran. Ha sido totalmente lógico. Lo ha anotado todo… Unos meses después, W. B. Yeats, en un debate público en Dublín, además de declarar a Joyce “el escritor más original e influyente de nuestro tiempo”,
dijo que Ulises llegaba al “alcance último del realismo”. Por su parte, Ezra Pound (Mercure de France, junio 1922), hablando de Flaubert, se refería a Joyce en cuanto flaubertiano, no sólo en su sentido del arte estilístico, sino en su realismo crítico, especialmente irritado por la estupidez humana, trazando un paralelo entre Bloom y Bouvard–Pécuchet. Esta observación de Pound fue deformada como objeción por Edmund Wilson, dentro de un ensayo (en New Republic, 1922) que sigue siendo, por lo demás, una de las grandes piezas de la crítica joyceana. Wilson, en realidad, no nombra a Pound al poner su observación junto a la obtusa incomprensión de un novelista rastrero como era Arnold Bennett: No puedo estar de acuerdo con Mr. Arnold Bennett en que J. J. tenga un colosal resentimiento contra la humanidad. Me parece que lo que le choca a Mr. Bennett es que Mr. Joyce haya dicho toda la verdad. Fundamentalmente, Ulises no es en absoluto como Bouvard et Pécuchet (como algunos han intentado defender). Flaubert viene a decir que nos va a demostrar que la humanidad es mezquina enumerando todas las bajezas de que ha sido capaz. Pero Joyce, incluyendo todas las bajezas, hace que sus figuras burguesas conquisten nuestra comprensión y respeto dejándonos ver en ellas los dolores de parto de la mente humana siempre esforzándose por perpetuarse y perfeccionarse, y del cuerpo siempre trabajando y palpitando para hacer surgir alguna belleza desde su sombra. Edmund Wilson, después, entraría por primera vez a plantear el gran problema que hay en la valoración de la expresión joycena, el contraste entre un lado magistralmente sólido
… (más)
 
Denunciada
ferperezm | 3 reseñas más. | Mar 1, 2023 |
La mejor manera de leer Ulises sería zambullirse directamente en sus páginas, dejándose llevar por el poderío musical y ambiental de su palabra, y encomendando confiadamente sus oscuridades a la esperanza de una gradual familiarización con la obra. Sólo para la relectura —esencial, como en toda gran cima de la literatura universal— sería ya plenamente lícito utilizar informaciones y referencias externas. De hecho, lo relatado en Ulises es sencillísimo, y aun vulgar: la dificultad del libro radica en que su autor, como gran poeta que es, aunque en prosa, tiene una viva memoria verbal —incluso auditiva—, y no sólo incorpora las innumerables asociaciones lingüísticas que hay en su mente —citas literarias, trozos de óperas, canciones, vocablos extranjeros, chistes y juegos de palabras, términos teológicos y científicos, etc. —, sino que supone que su lector ha de tener el mismo don de buena memoria —aparte de que, lo que ya es demasiado pedir, ha de poseer su mismo archivo de recuerdos sonoros. Y ese requerimiento de buena memoria verbal es hoy día aún más aventurado que cuando se escribió Ulises: la educación y la técnica contemporáneas están debilitando y desprestigiando la memoria —sobre todo en cuanto memoria verbal. Ya los niños no aprenden versos de memoria en la escuela, y se considera elegante, y aun típico de un intelectual, presumir de mala memoria (nadie presume de mala inteligencia, en cambio). A cada momento, en efecto, hay en Ulises frases y expresiones cuyo sentido radica en que son repeticiones o parodias de alguna frase que apareció antes —a lo mejor, quinientas páginas antes. Por supuesto, esto resulta más grave en el lenguaje en sordina de una traducción, aun suponiendo que el traductor, por su parte, tenga suficiente memoria verbal como para haber reconocido la repetición en el original. Y no le era dado al traductor —ni para este problema, ni para ningún otro de los muchos que hay en Ulises— recurrir a las notas a pie de página: una traducción de Ulises no puede llevar notas porque, en caso de darlas con un mínimo de homogeneidad informativa, alcanzarían mayor extensión que el texto mismo (sólo para las alusiones literarias existe un índice de más de quinientas páginas: Weldon Thornton, Allusions in “Ulysses”, Nueva
York, 1973). El lector ha de suponer que en cualquier momento Joyce puede estar citando o caricaturizando un texto previo —que ni siquiera reconoce la inmensa mayoría de los lectores de lengua inglesa. En otro sentido, tampoco hubiera valido la pena poner la nota de “En español en el original” en los casos en que van aquí en cursiva palabras por lo demás normales —especialmente claro es el caso cuando se reproducen en forma gramaticalmente incorrecta. Tampoco había verdadera necesidad de poner nota en el caso de los innumerables juegos de palabras: a veces, se ha logrado reproducir el juego en español, o sustituirlo por otro parecido; otras veces, ha habido que dejarlo perder; en algunos casos, había que mantener a toda costa el juego de palabras como tal, porque luego reaparecería como leit–motiv, pero, a la vez, no se encontraba un chiste equivalente: entonces se ha dejado el juego en inglés, acompañándolo de su versión literal y sin gracia, para que el lector sepa a qué atenerse (al fin y al cabo, Cortázar y Carlos Fuentes nos han acostumbrado a los juegos de palabras en inglés en boca de hispanohablantes). Al final del libro, en Apéndice, para quien quiera entretenerse en semejantes crucigramas, se incluye el esquema de interpretación simbólica que trazó el propio Joyce para uso de amigos, pero prohibiéndoles que lo publicaran: hubo siempre un conflicto entre el Joyce creador —narrador poético y musical de la sencilla realidad humana en su Dublín familiar— y el Joyce aficionado a los juegos de palabras, los
paralelismos y los simbolismos historicoculturales, que serían pedantescos si no fueran humorísticos. Djuna Barnes cuenta que, en vísperas de la publicación de Ulises, James Joyce le confió, en el café Les Deux Magots: “Lo malo es que el público pedirá y encontrará una moraleja en mi libro, o peor, que lo tomará de algún modo serio, y, por mi honor de caballero, no hay en él una sola línea en serio”.

Aquí, en estas páginas de información previa, procuraremos atenernos a lo directamente dado en Ulises y a la circunstancia histórica en que surge y que
retrata, reduciendo a su mínimo inevitable las referencias homéricas (en rigor, sólo presentes en el título de la obra: los títulos de alusión a la Odisea que
presidían los capítulos publicados en revistas, fueron suprimidos en el libro). Sabemos que Joyce recomendaba a sus amigos que releyeran despacio la Odisea antes de abordar Ulises, pero no hay ninguna razón para que las referencias externas aconsejadas por un autor sean realmente convenientes para la lectura. Más bien parece obvio que al lector de Ulises le conviene conocer una buena parte de la obra anterior de James Joyce, es decir, Dublineses, como estampas de ambiente y presentación de algunas de las figuras de Ulises, y, sobre todo, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, que en la memorable traducción de Alfonso Donado (Dámaso Alonso) se tituló El artista adolescente, pero cuyo título quizá convenga entender poniéndolo dentro de la terminología de la historia del arte, algo así como Retrato del artista joven o Autorretrato juvenil. Casi cabe considerar el Autorretrato como el primer volumen de Ulises: su protagonista, Stephen Dedalus, contrafigura del autor (en su juventud), será protagonista de los tres primeros capítulos y del noveno de Ulises y deuteragonista de algunos de los restantes, en contrapunto con Leopold Bloom, “autorretrato” de un posible y malogrado “artista ya no joven” y ya no artista —auto caricatura, en realidad, del Joyce maduro. Pero con esto estamos preludiando ya la apoyatura informativa que, en todo caso, no le viene mal tener al lector de Ulises, bien sea para usar antes de la lectura, o, mejor, después, en recapitulación preparatoria a la relectura, o, aún mejor, nunca, simplemente sabiendo que está ahí y la podría consultar si quisiera. Tras la información sucinta sobre la circunstancia histórica, vida del autor, y génesis de Ulises, damos una síntesis de los capítulos de la obra, a modo de plano o guía: por cierto, que, al aludir a los capítulos, lo haremos siempre mediante su número de orden, puesto entre corchetes, ya que el autor no los numeró, y, en el libro, apenas indicó su separación, sino que sólo los
agrupó en tres secuencias: 1, que comprende los capítulos [1] a [3]; 2, de [4] a [15]; y 3, de [16] a [18]. Es de notar cómo van creciendo en extensión los
capítulos: así, los tres primeros, sumados (o sea, toda la secuencia 1) no equivalen ni a la mitad de la extensión del capítulo [15]. Los críticos acostumbran a designar las tres secuencias y los dieciocho capítulos de Ulises por sus respectivas referencias a episodios o entidades de la Odisea, según hizo Joyce al publicar en revista algunos de esos capítulos. Pero, como ya se advirtió, Joyce suprimió esos títulos en el libro, por lo que preferimos indicarlos sólo de
pasada en estas informaciones previas, para no imponer demasiado al lector tal referencia clásica —a veces, como se señalará, traída por los pelos. Después, en el cuerpo del libro mismo, también nos hemos permitido añadir esos números entre corchetes en la cabecera de los capítulos para que el lector pueda hacer más fácil uso de las informaciones que aquí ofrecemos, si es que así lo desea. Ulises cuenta lo que les ocurre a esos dos personajes de James Joyce —Stephen Dedalus y Leopold Bloom— en Dublín, desde las 8 de la mañana del jueves 4 de junio de 1904 hasta las 2 de la madrugada siguiente (las tres primeras horas, por separado, duplicando el relato), con un apéndice, desde las 2 hasta alrededor de las 3 de esa madrugada, en la mente en duermevela de Molly Bloom, esposa de Leopold. La ciudad y la vida del autor, pues, forman el material del libro: un material que Joyce hace maravillosamente perceptible a sus lectores, pero sin duda contando con que éstos supieran de su propio mundo más de lo que cabe pedir que sepa un lector hispano actual. Aunque Joyce no se propone hacer “novela social”, su Dublín resulta tan palpable como el Londres de Dickens o el París de Balzac o el de Zola: sin ánimo especial de exponer luchas por el dinero y el poder —o, simplemente, la subsistencia—, como los clásicos de la novela decimonónica, nos sumerge directamente en la sensación de las estrecheces de la pequeña clase media dublinesa, con el alcohol, la música —y, tal vez, la mujer— como únicas aperturas de evasión y olvido. Cierto que esto, que hubiera sido suficiente para otros novelistas, en Joyce no es más que el telón de fondo, pero también cuenta mucho como tal. Irlanda era entonces —con poco más de cinco millones de habitantes— parte del Reino Unido británico, bajo una peculiar autonomía presidida por un virrey que residía en “el Castillo”: su comitiva recorre las calles en los capítulos [10] y [11]. En comparación con la gran expansión económica inglesa durante el siglo XIX, Irlanda había quedado rezagada —salvo en el Ulster, la zona del nordeste que no se independizaría de Inglaterra y que aún es famosa por la endémica guerra civil que los medios informativos presentan como guerra religiosa entre católicos y protestantes, callando el hecho de que aquéllos sean la clase oprimida y éstos la opresora. La secular miseria irlandesa no se había resuelto más que a medias durante el siglo XIX —uno de sus más sólidos progresos fue la difusión de la patata como alimento humano (es curioso que Leopold Bloom lleve siempre en el bolsillo, como talismán heredado de su madre, una pequeña patata vieja y arrugada). La emigración a Norteamérica, en los famosos barcos–ataúd”, tomaba caracteres desesperados en los años de mala cosecha de patata (una de las informaciones de la prensa dublinesa del 16 de junio de 1904, aludida en Ulises, es la vista judicial de una estafa prometiendo pasaje barato al Canadá). En Irlanda, dejada así atrás por Inglaterra, como proveedora de productos agrícolas y ganado, crece durante el siglo XIX un movimiento autonomista que llega a adquirir gran energía en los años ochenta bajo el liderazgo de Charles Stewart Parnell —uno de los leit–motive de Ulises: su hermano sobreviviente, John, aparece en varios capítulos, y en el [16] Leopold Bloom recuerda cómo, en su juventud, conoció al gran jefe en una revuelta, con asalto a un periódico, y le recogió el sombrero que se le cayó en la refriega. El proyecto de reconocimiento legal de la autonomía irlandesa (Home Rule) fue aprobado en 1886 por la Cámara de los Comunes, pero no por la de los Lores, a pesar del apoyo del premier Gladstone: por otra parte, Parnell cayó en desprestigio al ser llevado a los tribunales por un marido ofendido. El clero, y muchos de sus secuaces, le abandonaron —se alude a ello repetidamente en Ulises—, pero al morir poco después Parnell, se difundió la leyenda de que no había muerto, sino que esperaba el retorno en el destierro, y en su tumba (descrita en [6]) se había enterrado un ataúd lleno de piedras. El partido autonomista se desvaneció con Parnell, reemplazándole varias fuerzas: ante todo, la tan mencionada en Ulises, los del Sinn Fein (“Nosotros Solos”, en lengua vernácula), inicialmente de carácter no–violento y pequeño– burgués; el laborismo irlandés, que quería extender las agitaciones de protesta hacia el proletariado urbano y rural; la hermandad secreta Irish Republican Brotherhood; y, como movimiento intelectual y literario, la Gaelic League, que afluye a la gran reviviscencia del teatro y la lírica irlandesa —en lengua inglesa, sin embargo, principalmente—, que tuvo en Lady Gregory su principal promotora y en W. B. Yeats su más característico y alto poeta —sin olvidar a A. E. (George Moore), presentado sarcásticamente en [10]. (La tragedia de este movimiento literario fue que sus figuras más sólidas se ausentaran del país: G. B. Shaw, para triunfar en Londres; el propio Joyce, como exilado voluntario en el Continente.)

En 1904, cuando se desarrolla la acción de Ulises, los movimientos irlandeses no habían alcanzado aún su punto de ebullición, pero en 1916, a los dos de los ocho años que tardó Joyce en escribir Ulises, se produce una rebelión armada que es dominada por las fuerzas británicas, ajusticiando a sus jefes,
pero que hace evidente la imposibilidad de mantener el estado de cosas frente al crecimiento de los laboristas y los cada vez más radicalizados Sinn Fein. En las elecciones de 1918 triunfa el Sinn Fein, flanqueado y desbordado por la aún hoy famosa I.R.A.: a fines de 1921, Inglaterra accede a dar a Irlanda una independencia apenas vinculada por la condición llamada de Dominion. En 1949, Irlanda se separaría incluso de la Commonwealth. James Joyce no sólo no se identificó con el nacionalismo irlandés, sino que lo atacó de modo sarcástico y a veces brutal. Dentro de Ulises, tal actitud tiene su condensación más extremosa en [12], caricatura de un innominado “Ciudadano”, monomaníaco exaltador de lo irlandés, en contraste con Bloom, que, hijo de un judío húngaro y desarraigado incluso de su propia raza, resulta un verdadero apátrida, mirado con recelo y distanciamiento por los dublineses, por más que proclame que su patria es Irlanda. En ese capítulo, la fantasía sobre la ejecución del joven rebelde irlandés resulta quizá demasiado cruel si se piensa que se escribió después de la ejecución de los jefes rebeldes de 1916. No es extraño que James Joyce haya tenido en su propio país una mala prensa que todavía colea: desde 1904, como veremos en seguida con más detalle, abandona Irlanda, para volver sólo en alguna visita ocasional, hasta 1912: morirá, en 1941, sin haber vuelto a poner los pies en Irlanda —y sólo muy fugazmente en Inglaterra. Pero esa falta de sentido nacionalista está en significativo contraste con su monomaníaca obsesión —a la vez amor y odio— por Dublín, tema único de toda su vida. James Augustine Joyce nació el 2 de febrero de 1882 en las afueras de Dublín — en Rathmines. Vale la pena anotar esa fecha — la Candelaria— porque en ella, cuarenta años exactos después, recibiría Joyce los primeros ejemplares de Ulises, enviados urgentemente por medio de un maquinista de tren para que le llegasen en el día de su cumpleaños; vale la pena anotar también su segundo nombre porque él le añadiría en su confirmación el de Aloysius (Luis Gonzaga), como buen escolar que era entonces de los jesuitas —entre 1888 y 1891, en el colegio Conglowes. Por dificultades económicas, el padre de Joyce, John Stanislaus —retratado en Autorretrato y Ulises como Simon Dedalus—, trasladó a James a otro colegio más modesto —humillante episodio que Joyce silenció siempre, pero que da materia al primer trozo de [10], con la actitud condescendiente del jesuita Conmee ante los chicos de las Escuelas Cristianas. El P. Conmee, figura real, fue profesor de Joyce en Conglowes, y pasó luego de rector a la escuela media jesuítica Belvedere, donde hizo entrar a Joyce como becario. Joyce declararía siempre deber a sus educadores jesuitas el entrenamiento en “reunir un material, ordenarlo y presentarlo”: de hecho, para bien o para mal, lo que recibió de los jesuitas fue tan vasto y complejo, que no sería arbitrario decir que la obra joyceana es la gran contribución —involuntaria, y aun como tiro salido por la culata— de la Compañía de Jesús a la literatura universal. Y no pensamos ahora en la crisis de fe y la problemática moral, entretejida con disquisiciones sobre el pensamiento estético de Santo Tomás de Aquino, en Autorretrato: ateniéndonos a Ulises, aparte de la inmensa masa de material teológico y litúrgico que utiliza Joyce sin el menor compromiso religioso ni antirreligioso, cabría decir que se trata de un examen de conciencia al modo jesuítico, llevado hasta el último extremo, sólo que, claro está, sin “dolor de corazón” ni “propósito de enmienda”. Pues el más típico examen de conciencia jesuítico es —como Ulises— el repaso de un día, al terminarlo, asumiendo uno mismo la acusación y la defensa —si, por un lado, con exhaustivo rigor, por otro lado, con flexibilidad casuística, atendiendo a atenuantes—, pero no la valoración ni el juicio —que se dejan “tal como esté en la presencia de Dios”—: es decir, obteniendo el “relato” como cabría decirlo ante un confesor, proceso tan literario como psicológico. Conviene dejar al menos insinuado este tema, porque empieza a resultar un poco añejo ya, incluso para católicos, después del Concilio Vaticano II, y con la actual crisis de los jesuitas como pedagogos por excelencia del catolicismo.

Los jesuitas de Belvedere, aplaudiendo a su escolar James Joyce por su brillantez retórica y literaria, y sin llegar a darse cuenta, al final, de su radical
crisis de fe y moral, contribuyeron a que su padre, aunque rodando por una pendiente de sucesivos desastres económicos, enviara a James al college católico de la Universidad de Dublín (University College), cuyo primer rector había sido el Cardenal Newman —para Joyce, el mejor prosista inglés— y donde había enseñado lenguas clásicas aquel jesuita Hopkins que después de su muerte sería conocido como gran poeta. En 1902 llegó a ser Joyce Bachelor of Arts —“Licenciado en Letras” diríamos aproximadamente—, y, flanqueado por su brillante hermano Stanislaus —también hombre literario, luego eficaz ayudador en su vida práctica, y, tras la muerte de James, autor de un libro de memorias My Brother’s Keeper—, empezó a tomar parte, con polémica arrogancia, en la vida literaria dublinesa. Su primera publicación, en una revista londinense, fue un elogio a Ibsen, escándalo de la época (aprendería el dano–noruego para leerle mejor, como Unamuno): además, atacó el nacionalismo, para él de vía estrecha, del Irish National Theatre, la más sagrada de las vacas del movimiento nacionalista irlandés. Ya licenciado en Artes, Joyce sondea vagamente otras carreras más prácticas: elige estudiar medicina, pero, significativamente, no en la facultad dublinesa, sino en París, a donde se traslada en otoño de 1902. Fracaso y regreso son inmediatos: vuelve, sin embargo, a París, a fines de 1902, con el proyecto de vivir de corresponsalías y colaboraciones, así como de clases particulares: de hecho, la mayor parte de su tiempo se repartió entre lecturas literarias en la biblioteca Sainte–Geneviève y las visitas a lugares menos santos
—de todo lo cual hay frecuentes ecos en Ulises. Un telegrama le hace volver junto a su madre, que muere en agosto de 1903, de cáncer de hígado ([1]).

En 1904 entra Joyce en su anno mirabili; el 7 de enero escribe un largo ensayo autobiográfico, A Portrait of the Artist, que, al no poder publicar, convierte en algo con pretensiones de novela, Stephen Hero, a su vez transformado en el Retrato propiamente dicho —el episodio final de Stephen Hero, eliminado en esta metamorfosis, será reabsorbido en el comienzo de Ulises. Además, Joyce escribe entonces numerosas poesías —luego incluidas en el librito Chamber Music—, publica Las hermanas, primera de las estampas de Dublineses, y, sobre todo, conoce por la calle a una criada de hotel, que va a ser la compañera de su vida: Nora Barnacle (y si el nombre Nora era ibseniano, resulta muy joyceano que barnacle sea ‘lapa’ y ‘percebe’, buenos símbolos de la adhesión fidelísima y paciente con que aquella inculta e importante mujer supo siempre aguantar y ayudar a su difícil compañero, cuya obra no leyó jamás). James Joyce pone pronto a prueba a su amada dándole la imagen más intranquilizadora de sí mismo, en una carta: …conviene que conozcas mi ánimo en la mayor parte de las cosas. Mi ánimo rechaza todo el presente orden social y el cristianismo —el hogar, las virtudes reconocidas, las clases en la vida y las doctrinas religiosas. ¿Cómo podría gustarme la idea del hogar? Mi hogar ha sido simplemente un asunto de clase media echado a perder por hábitos de derroche que he heredado. A mi madre la mataron lentamente los malos tratos de mi padre, años de dificultades, y la franqueza cínica de mi conducta. Cuando le miré a la cara, tendida en el ataúd —una cara gris, consumida por el cáncer—, comprendí
que miraba la cara de una víctima y maldije el sistema que la había hecho ser víctima. Éramos diecisiete en la familia. Mis hermanos y hermanas no son nada para mí. Sólo un hermano [Stanislaus] es capaz de comprenderme. Hace seis años dejé la Iglesia Católica odiándola con el mayor fervor. encontraba imposible para mí seguir en ella a causa de los impulsos de mi naturaleza. Le hice la guerra en secreto cuando era estudiante y rehusé
aceptar las posiciones que me ofrecía. Con eso, me he hecho un mendigo, pero he conservado mi orgullo. Ahora le hago la guerra abiertamente con lo que escribo y digo y hago. No puedo entrar en el orden social sino como vagabundo. He empezado a estudiar medicina tres veces, derecho una vez, música una vez. Hace una semana estaba arreglando marcharme como actor ambulante. No pude poner energía en el plan porque no dejabas de tirarme del codo… (Es curioso que el rompimiento de Joyce con el catolicismo se planteara a nivel meramente ético —y aun biológico— y no doctrinal: luego, en la época de Ulises, Joyce será fríamente neutral ante lo cristiano y lo religioso en general, sólo atento a usarlo a efectos de lenguaje —y, por un malentendido estético e intelectual, concediendo siempre preferencia al catolicismo, “absurdo coherente”, sobre el protestantismo, “absurdo incoherente”. En otro orden de convicciones, Joyce se consideró inicialmente socialista —y no sólo por esperanzas de un Estado que subvencionara a escritores y artistas—: luego perdió todo interés por lo político —en [17], a través de Bloom, su interés por las mejoras de la sociedad estará enfriado por la convicción de que la humanidad siempre lo echará a perder todo con sus tonterías, “vanidad de vanidad”.) Pero cerremos este paréntesis y volvamos a la primavera de 1904: la carta que citábamos es del 29 de agosto: el 16 de junio había sido la primera vez que James y Nora salieron a dar un paseo nocturno, y ésa sería la fecha del día de Ulises —Bloomsday, se le suele llamar, a la vez como alusión al protagonista, señor Bloom, y al Doomsday, Día del Juicio—; fecha conmemorada hoy día por algunos joyceanos con ritos tales como comer un riñón de cerdo con el desayuno de té y tostadas ([4]).

Sin embargo, en “reorganización retrospectiva” —frase también dilecta en Ulises—, Joyce trasladará a esa fecha algo que de hecho ocurrió en septiembre, y que, adscrito a la personalidad de Stephen Dedalus, forma el episodio inicial de Ulises: con su amigo el estudiante de medicina y alevín literario Oliver St. John Gogarty (en Ulises, Buck Mulligan) y un estudiante inglés interesado en la lengua y las tradiciones irlandesas (Trench: Haines en el libro), se instaló, cerca de Dublín, en una de las torres llamadas “Martello”, fortificaciones cilíndricas construidas en 1804, en número de varios centenares, por las costas británicas, contra posibles desembarcos napoleónicos, y entonces, un siglo después, cedidas en barato alquiler a quien
tuviera la humorada de meterse en tales construcciones. Por lo que se puede ver en [1], la idea de los jóvenes era establecer en esa redonda morada el ómphalos, el ombligo de una gestación cultural, una helenización de Irlanda con signo anticasticista. Pero la convivencia no duró más que una semana, y, según se alude en el libro, terminó literalmente a tiros, dirigidos contra unas cacerolas que colgaban sobre la cabecera de Joyce. Gogarty fue luego importante médico y ocasional escritor —autor subterráneo de poesías irreverentes y/u obscenas, como la “Balada del Jovial Jesús”, algunas de cuyas estrofas vemos recitar a Buck Mulligan en [1]: en Ulises, además de propenso al humor impío, aparece como el Judas traidor a Stephen Dedalus —a quien deja a la intemperie, sin llave ni posibilidades de volver a la torre Martello, después de pelearse a puñetazos con él, en episodio no presentado directamente en Ulises, pero aludido en [15] y [16]. En la vida real, Joyce atribuyó a instigaciones de Gogarty cierto episodio posterior, uno de los más amargos de su vida: la calumniosa pretensión de cierto común amigo de haber disfrutado de los favores de Nora mientras ésta empezaba a salir con Joyce. Su vendetta literaria contra Gogarty fue eternizarle en forma de Buck Mulligan. Pero, volviendo a junio de 1904, seis días después de su primer paseo con Nora, y al parecer todavía sin ánimo de guardarle a ésta, fidelidad corporal, Joyce tuvo otra aventura nocturna cargada de porvenir: al dirigirse a una muchacha —“en vocativo femenino”, dirá en [15]— su miopía no le dejó advertir que iba seguida por un acompañante militar, que le derribó de un puñetazo. De su desplome le ayudó a salir —“de la manera más ortodoxamente samaritana” [16]— cierto judío famoso por las infidelidades de su mujer. Más adelante, Joyce, estando en Roma, como empleado bancario, entre julio de 1906 y febrero de 1907, pensó utilizar este episodio para una nueva estampa de la serie Dublineses, bajo el título Ulises: un noctámbulo, vagabundo como Ulises, vuelve a su Ítaca doméstica con ayuda de un judío. La tentación de la caricatura cultural y literaria era muy fuerte: el Judío Errante se hermana con el Griego Navegante para salvarle y restituirle a su ómphalos: la síntesis cultural judeo– helénica, etc. etc. Pero quizá ese mismo título, Ulises, sacaba el proyectado relato fuera del punto de vista inmediato y directo de Dublineses: el hecho es que Joyce lo dejó en su memoria hasta que se convirtió en el germen de su libro, donde se sitúa hacia el final de [15].

En septiembre de 1904, James Joyce, desahuciado de la torre Martello, peleado con los devotos del renacimiento cultural irlandés, y terriblemente —
pero aun castamente— apasionado por Nora, decidió marcharse de Irlanda de cualquier modo, llevándose sólo a su amada. Por un anuncio de un agente, creyó encontrar un empleo enseñando inglés en la Berlitz School de Zürich, a donde llegó, con la ya definitiva compañía de Nora, sin preocuparse de formalizaciones matrimoniales —que no tendrían lugar hasta 1931, siendo ya mayores sus dos hijos, el bajo cantante Giorgio y la artista demente Lucia. Llegados a Zürich, resultó que no había tal empleo: sí lo había, en cambio, en la Berlitz School de Pola, la ciudad adriática entonces austrohúngara, luego italiana, hoy yugoslava. Poco después, Joyce mejoró ligeramente pasando a la cercana Trieste, donde también fue a enseñar su ayudador hermano Stanislaus —y una hermana, que se casó con un banquero austríaco. Por suerte, James Joyce, siempre gran lingüista, hablaba ya fluidamente el italiano, aprendido por gusto con un jesuita en Dublín: un elemento más de su gradual apego a Trieste. El italiano fue el idioma de la familia Joyce, incluso cuando se trasladaron luego a Zürich y a París: en italiano serían las desesperadas conversaciones de Joyce con su hija Lucia cuando ésta fue hundiéndose, en Francia, en una progresiva demencia a la que quizá contribuyeron su atmósfera de desarraigo, su identificación con su padre y la bizquera que estropeaba su belleza —alguien habla, pero no parece comprobado, de una tragedia sentimental, un fracasado amor, en París, por el gran discípulo de su padre, Samuel Beckett. En Trieste, Joyce se encontró en gran estrechez económica: mientras tanto, su lanzamiento editorial tropieza con dificultades: Dublineses había sido aceptado por un editor de Londres, pero no se publica por diversos tabús —miedo a reacciones locales, puritanismos británicos, y sobre todo, temor por algunas alusiones a la realeza. En 1912 son quemados sus ejemplares ya impresos, y no saldrá hasta 1914, con otro editor. Mientras tanto, en 1905, ha nacido su hijo, Giorgio. Entre 1906 y 1907, según se indicó, Joyce intentó consolidar su posición trabajando en un banco en Roma, pero le ahogaba el empleo oficinesco, y volvió a su ya imprescindible Trieste, donde, ese mismo año 1907, nació su hija Lucia, en el pabellón de pobres del hospital, mientras Joyce estaba gravemente enfermo con fiebres reumáticas —tal vez por infecciones dentales que, con su afición constante al alcohol, contribuyeron al mal estado de sus ojos, a la larga, casi ceguera. También en 1907 se publica en Londres la primera colección de versos de Joyce, Chamber Music, no sin vacilaciones de última hora del autor, que se da cuenta de lo atrasadas que quedan esas poesías al lado de sus empeños narrativos de entonces.

Entre 1909 y 1912, Joyce hace tres viajes a Irlanda, uno de ellos con un proyecto práctico digno del señor Bloom, pero que efectivamente hubiera podido sacarle de su pobreza: establecer una sala de cine, la primera de Dublín —Cine Volta—, un buen negocio si Joyce se hubiera quedado atendiéndolo en Dublín. Pero regresó a Trieste, donde, en 1912, la familia Joyce se habría visto puesta de patitas en la calle de no ser por los préstamos del buen hermano Stanislaus. Algo mejora luego la posición de Joyce al obtener una cátedra de inglés en la escuela comercial Revoltella —que, después de la guerra, sería parte de la Universidad de Trieste, my revolver University, diría Joyce, jugando con rivoltella, “revólver”. También publica algunos artículos sobre la cuestión irlandesa en el periódico local Il Piccolo, escritos en su atildadísimo italiano, y da varias conferencias públicas —notables las dedicadas a su predilecto Daniel Defoe, y a Blake. También da clases particulares, a veces a alumnos de gran categoría personal: así, a un gran industrial judío, Ettore Schmitz, al cual y a su mujer —que luego sería la Anna Silvia Plurabelle de Finnegans Wake—, les leyó un día Joyce el relato final de Dublineses. Schmitz, impresionado por la calidad literaria de su mercante di gerundi, como le llamaba, le confió que había publicado hacía tiempo dos novelas que no habían tenido ningún eco, Una vita y Senilità, bajo el seudónimo —el lector ya habrá caído en la cuenta— de Italo Svevo. Joyce, después de leerlas, citó de memoria con elogio algunos pasajes, afirmando que ni el mismo Anatole France los mejoraría. Schmitz, estimulado,
volvió al ejercicio de la literatura, publicando unos años después La coscienza di Zeno, que Joyce, entonces en París, hizo leer a su propio “lanzador”, Valéry Larbaud, obteniendo el aplauso no sólo de éste, sino, a través de éste, de Eugenio Montale, con lo que Italo Svevo empezó a contar para la conciencia literaria italiana.

Otro hecho, al que acabamos de aludir, iba tomando creciente importancia en la vida de Joyce: desde siempre dado a la bebida, como buen dublinés,
adopta el vino como recurso y evasión —no sin discriminar y matizar en sus calidades, aparte de preferirlo como elemento de la buena mesa, cuyos placeres compartía con Nora, también de apetito realmente homérico. A Joyce no le gustaba el vino tinto —“bistec licuefacto”, le llamaba—, sino el blanco —“electricidad”, según él—, procurando ser fiel a alguna determinada especie local: en Zürich elegiría, para su monogamia alcohólica cierto Fendant de Sion, con vago saborcillo a mineral metálico, en alemán Erz, que él extendió a Erzherzogin (‘archiduquesa’) para dar una interpretación de su color a tono con el Ulises en que trabajaba, y siguiendo la sugerencia de un amigo italiano: “Sí, è pipí, ma è pipí di arciduchessa”. Por desgracia, el alcohol dañaba a Joyce en su punto débil, los ojos, afectos de varios trastornos que, a pesar de diez delicadísimas operaciones durante los veinte años siguientes, le dejarían casi ciego. Cierto que parecía haber en ello algo de predestinación —kismet, diría el señor Bloom—: Joyce era poco visual y muy musical, con una excelente voz de tenor, probada con éxito en conciertos, y literariamente pendiente siempre del oído —en Ulises, piénsese sobre todo en [11]—, mientras que sobre pintura se conservan muy pocas, aunque buenas, observaciones suyas, a la vez que su sentido óptico de la tipografía y la
corrección de pruebas era desastroso. Incluso, hay quizá siempre cierta torpeza en la descripción joyceana de movimientos, desplazamientos y referencias en el espacio: por ejemplo, en el comienzo de Ulises, quizá sea eso uno de los factores que lo hacen ser el punto más débil y oscuro de todo el libro. 1914 es el año literariamente decisivo para James Joyce, no tanto porque al fin se publique Dublineses, cuanto por la aparición en su horizonte de un providencial agente literario: Ezra Pound. El poeta exilado americano, entonces secretario de W. B. Yeats en Londres, desarrollaba su especial talento de buscador de talentos, procurando colaboraciones para revistas inglesas y norteamericanas. Al invitar a Joyce, por sugerencia de Yeats, a que enviara algo para la londinense The Egoist, aquél le envía parte del Retrato del artista, que, desde el número de febrero, va apareciendo, hasta su totalidad, en entregas mensuales: desde entonces, Joyce se siente alguien en la auténtica sociedad literaria, gracias a ese “cónsul general” que era Pound. Termina así el Retrato, bajo el estimulante apremio de los plazos fijos, después que, en un momento de desánimo, había tirado el manuscrito al fuego, de donde lo salvó su hermana. Al utilizar para el Retrato ese borrador que había sido Stephen Hero, deja fuera —como ya dijimos— su episodio final: ahora, publicado el Retrato, lo convertirá en la primera secuencia de lo que será Ulises ([1]–[3]). El estirón de la estatura literaria de Joyce es notable, pero, increíblemente, en ese punto, en vez de seguir adelante, se echa atrás una temporada para escribir un opaco dramón neoibseniano ventilando pleitos personales, Exiliados. Con todo, es como si así soltara lastre muerto: a partir de ahí, combina la nueva andadura de Stephen
Dedalus con la vieja idea de un Ulises asistido por un judío–samaritano —sólo que ahora el judío se vuelve uliseico él mismo. Y no está solo Pound —il signor Sterlina, traduce su protegido— en asistir a Joyce: la editora de The Egoist, Harriet Shaw Weaver, fascinada por la genialidad del Retrato, se convierte en ángel custodio de Joyce, mucho tiempo a distancia y a menudo en secreto, mientras duran los años de gestación y lanzamiento de Ulises. Entre tanto, precisamente cuando Joyce se está entregando con energía a su gran creación, estalla la Primera Guerra Europea —la “Gran” Guerra—, que, en su ánimo, le deja indiferente: después, preguntado cómo se las había arreglado durante ese tiempo, se limitaría a exclamar con indolencia: “Ah sí, he oído decir que ha habido una guerra por ahí”. Pero, materialmente, la guerra termina con su trabajo y su residencia en Trieste, ciudad entonces austrohúngara, donde Joyce era, pues, ciudadano de país enemigo. Su hermano Stanislaus, soltero y más joven y más político, es internado en un campo de concentración, mientras que James, padre de familia y militarmente inútil por su mala vista, puede pasar con los suyos a la neutral Suiza, sin más que dar su palabra de honor de que no actuaría por la causa militar aliada. Y bien dispuesto estaba el antimilitarista Joyce a guardar esa palabra, pero, de modo pacífico, no se negó a contribuir al prestigio cultural británico en Zürich apoyando un grupo dramático inglés donde actuó su mujer
—para terminar en seguida peleándose con el cónsul británico por un motivo trivial. Zürich, centro del oasis suizo entre países combatientes, hervía de espías y de figuras variopintas: en el café Pfauen, Joyce conoció fugazmente a aquel revolucionario ruso, Vladímir Uliánov, que, cuando ya no esperaba nada, se vio invitado a volver a su patria por los alemanes, con la maquiavélica esperanza de que fomentaría el desorden en la retaguardia zarista —y era Lenin, claro. En cambio, no llegó a conocer —cartas cantan— a aquel desertor alemán, Hugo Ball, que compró el Cabaret Voltaire para dar espectáculos literarios en colaboración con un poeta rumano, Tristan Tzara, francés de lengua adoptada —y ahí nació Dada. Algunos se sentirían tentados a imaginar contactos entre el dadaísmo y el que entonces escribía Ulises, pero no creemos que a éste le hubiera podido interesar aquel movimiento, pues Ulises contiene de sobra, sólo que en forma “aplicada”, como elemento de un relato coherente, todo lo que el dadaísmo quiso aislar en forma químicamente pura.

Desde junio de 1915 hasta octubre de 1919, la familia Joyce residió en Zürich —hay un vago episodio sentimental sin materializar, con una tal Martha
Fleischmann (Martha será la corresponsal pseudónima de Bloom en Ulises). En 1916 se publica el Retrato en forma de libro en Nueva York (un año después, en Londres); en 1918, también en ambas orillas, la obra teatral Exiliados. Joyce, en Zürich, vive absorto en su creciente obra: cuanto pasa o se dice en su horizonte encuentra o no resonancia en su ánimo según que pueda insertarse en el complejo tejido de su libro. Los numerosos amigos judíos y griegos que hace entonces no imaginaban que estaban sirviendo de materia para su trabajo. A veces, se le va una jornada entera de labor en determinar el mejor orden de las palabras en sólo dos frases —pensamos en Flaubert, maestro de Joyce no sólo en esto, sino en su fascinación por las tonterías del lenguaje corriente y las pedanterías de los hombres vulgares: como señalaría Pound, el señor Bloom tiene mucho de Bouvard y Pécuchet, a la vez que de autocaricatura de Joyce, y ahí —y eso ya lo señalamos nosotros— radica el problema de la verosimilitud psicológica de Bloom, demasiado rico en el material verbal de su pensamiento para poder ser, sin más, ese señorín semiculto de opiniones risibles. Cada episodio surgía en torno a un término de referencia a la Odisea —que se indicará luego, en resumen—: referencia a veces muy remota, y, a menudo, con algo de private joke, de chiste que sólo entiende el que lo hace, si no da especial información al contarlo. Más importante que ese andamiaje es el hecho de que cada episodio tenga una técnica y una voz diferentes —si se quiere, “un punto de vista” diferente. De hecho, algunos de los dieciocho capítulos tienen más de una voz, bien sea sucesivamente [13], bien sea en alternancia [12]. Por lo que toca al “punto de vista”, hay capítulos —los menos— en que el señor
Bloom aparece visto —o entrevisto fugazmente— desde alguna otra persona, o desde un narrador impersonal: más frecuente es que el relato incluya —o aun tenga como base— el proceso mental del señor Bloom en su verbalización básica, sin necesidad de hacer explícitas las conexiones lógicas ni explicar las referencias. Esto es lo que suele designarse con el término de Henry James “corriente de conciencia”, y lo que llamó Valéry Larbaud, al presentar Ulises, “monólogo interior”: el propio Joyce lo llamó “palabra interior” al declararse deudor de tal técnica a la olvidada novela de Edouard Dujardin Les lauriers sont coupés —recientemente traducida en España. Quizá silenciaba James Joyce hasta qué punto debía esa técnica a su hermano Stanislaus, quien, en un esbozo psicológico–narrativo, intentó imitar el monólogo interior de un moribundo tal como se lo había sugerido Tolstoi en el personaje Praskujin de los Apuntes de Sebastopol. En todo caso, Joyce sacó así de su olvido a Dujardin: ya antes de publicarse Ulises, en 1921, Valéry Larbaud imitó esa técnica en sus Amants, heureux amants, señalando debérsela a Dujardin, a través de Joyce, en su prólogo a la reedición de Les lauriers en 1924. Dujardin dedicó esta reedición a Joyce como milagroso autor de su resurrección literaria; y, en efecto, no sólo escribió otra posterior novela, sino que se hizo teórico de su técnica (en 1931 publicó un libro titulado Le monologue interior). Por su parte, Joyce, cuando aparece la
traducción francesa de Ulises, envía un ejemplar a Dujardin así dedicado: “A E.D., annonciateur de la parole intérieure. Le larron impénitent, James Joyce”.

A finales de 1917, Joyce creía tener ya una gran parte del libro —tal vez, sin embargo, no sería ni la mitad del resultado final, que no preveía tan largo—:
entonces pensó en ir publicando ya lo escrito, en forma serial, tal vez como manera de estimularse y obligarse a sí mismo a llevar la novela, a plazo fijo, a un término que todavía no veía muy claro. Naturalmente, Joyce brindó la publicación a Harriet Shaw Weaver, en The Egoist, donde había aparecido el
Retrato. Pero aquí se iba a plantear más agudamente el problema que ya había previsto Joyce cuando trabajaba en el Retrato, según escribió a Stanislaus: «Lo que escribo con las intenciones más lúgubres, será considerado como obsceno». El puritanismo anglosajón no podía —entonces— admitir la franqueza absoluta de la obra joyceana, que anota todas las tonterías e indecencias que pudieran írseles pasando por las mentes a sus criaturas narrativas. Probablemente una tradición católica —y aún más si jesuítica, como la de Joyce— da ciertas facilidades para semejante franqueza de cinismo total —que, en definitiva, es también franqueza para con nosotros mismos, en cuanto que reconocemos que nuestra mente tiene no poco de semejante con cualquier mente que se destape—: y no sólo por la costumbre de la confesión, con su examen previo, incluso de pensamientos, sino por la conciencia de que siempre estamos pasando de justos a pecadores y viceversa, por lo que no importa demasiado reconocer las propias faltas y vicios, y, en concreto, la tendencia de nuestro pensamiento a la deriva, en su impunidad solitaria, a pararse en lo que no debe. Como ya dijo el vulgo, o sea Campoamor, la vida es pecar, hacer penitencia, y luego vuelta a empezar.

Basta que la muerte no sea “supitaña” y deje un momento para el trámite final, pues, como dijo Don Juan Tenorio, un punto de contrición da al alma la salvación. (Los italianos saben llegar aún más lejos que los españoles en el uso de la autoacusación como hábil coartada: «Sono un porco!» grita Aldo Fabrizi en el final de Prima Communione, y queda, así como un señor, dispuesto a recomenzar sus pequeñas porquerías.) En cambio, en la tradición calvinista puritana, con su intenso sentido de predestinación, entre los “santos” y los que se van a condenar, resulta más escandaloso semejante destape total de la conciencia, porque, a ese nivel básico, en la “palabra interior”, el lector puede desconfiar de pertenecer a los “santos” al descubrirse tan parecido en su mecanismo mental a los personajes literarios —por más que procure reprimir y limpiar su pensamiento—: Hyppocrite lecteur, mon semblable, mon frère! Para la publicación de la obra joyceana —lo mismo en Inglaterra que en los Estados Unidos— las barreras eran múltiples y temibles (hablamos en pretérito porque, aunque tal vez las leyes sigan siendo las mismas, hoy no se suele pensar en los países anglosajones que un libro tenga el menor efecto en la moral pública). Ante todo, la acusación de obscenidad se juzgaba referida a pasajes, e incluso frases, e incluso palabras sueltas, sin poder apelar al contexto —criterio éste según el cual la Biblia debería estar prohibida, al menos en su Antiguo Testamento. Además, los impresores eran los primeros responsables de toda posible indecencia, sin poder descargarse en editores o autores. Después venían
—y vienen, con toda actualidad— las autoridades postales, que, de hecho, funcionan como censura gubernativa, con atentos lectores y activos hornos
crematorios, en cuestiones de obscenidad y de subversión política. Y, por encima de todo, la autoridad judicial, dispuesta a actuar a requerimiento de
individuos o sociedades dedicadas a la persecución de la indecencia. Harriet Shaw Weaver, despreciando su propio riesgo, hubo de pasar un
año buscando tipógrafo, hasta que encontró uno que se atrevió a imprimir —y eso con algunos cortes— los capítulos [2], [3], [6] y [10]. (El matrimonio
Virginia–Leonard Woolf rechazó la oferta de ser coeditores e impresores, en su prensa de mano de la Hogarth Press.) Para entonces, Joyce, impaciente, ya había recurrido a Ezra Pound, con la esperanza de hallar más libertad en Estados Unidos. Pound envió los tres primeros capítulos a la Little Review, nacida en Chicago en 1914 y recién trasladada a Nueva York, bajo la inspiración de Margaret Anderson, quien, apenas leyó el primer párrafo del capítulo [3], dijo “Lo imprimiremos, aunque sea el último esfuerzo de nuestra vida”. Pero tampoco fue fácil encontrar un tipógrafo igualmente entusiasta: al fin, un serbocroata, insensible a los atrevimientos verbales en inglés, se prestó a ello. Lo malo de la publicación por capítulos en la revista era que, si una sola de las entregas era condenada, ya no podría publicarse el libro en su integridad, pero Joyce desoyó el prudente consejo de abandonar la serialización y reservar toda la batalla para el libro entero una vez acabado. Y, en efecto, los censores de Correos, verdaderos Argos de asombrosa capacidad de lectura, no tardaron en caer sobre la minoritaria revistilla, confiscando y quemando los números donde iban los capítulos [8], [9] y [12]. Si el lector observa de cuáles se trata —sobre todo [9] y [12]— se asombrará de tal quema: el caso de [8] es especialmente interesante, porque, aparte de algún vago ensueño erótico de Bloom, lo que escandalizó debió ser la crudeza con que se pinta el acto de comer y beber, amén de las ventosidades finales. Joyce, cuyos inocentes Dublineses ya habían ardido inéditos en su primera edición, comentó: “Es la segunda vez que me queman en este mundo, así que espero pasar por el fuego del purgatorio tan deprisa como mi patrono San Luis Gonzaga”. Pero aún hubo algo peor: el capítulo [13], con exhibicionismo distante de ropa interior de Gerty MacDowell, fue denunciado por la Sociedad para la Prevención del Vicio, de Nueva York, y, a pesar de brillantes defensas de orden literario, fue condenado a multa y abandono de la publicación. Era en 1921: las víctimas tuvieron conciencia de un paralelo con los procesos en que —en un mismo año (1875) y con el mismo fiscal, por cierto, secreto autor de versos pornográficos— fueron condenados Les fleurs du mal y Madame Bovary. Pero la obra de Baudelaire pudo seguir editándose con la exclusión de las pièces condamnées, y la condena de Madame Bovary fue más bien una reprimenda, incluso buena propaganda para las posteriores ventas del libro —con horror de
Flaubert ante tal malentendido.

Quedaba una última posibilidad: París. James Joyce, en 1920, se había instalado en París, con su familia, tras un intento de restablecimiento en
Trieste, y pensando detenerse sólo unos días de camino a Londres. Ezra Pound, ya establecido en París, aconsejó a Joyce asentarse allí, uniéndose así los dos a la multitud de americanos literarios de los años veinte —Hemingway, Faulkner…—, presidida por la exilada de antes de la guerra, Gertrude Stein —quien, por cierto, sentiría luego grandes celos de Joyce, reivindicando su primacía en ciertas invenciones técnicas. El consejo de Pound resultó ser tan sano como todos los suyos —y no sólo con Joyce: es sabido qué bien corrigió a Eliot su Waste Land, precisamente por entonces. En efecto, James Joyce, apenas llegado, conoció a Sylvia Beach, una joven americana que acababa de abrir una librería de lengua inglesa, Shakespeare & Co., a la vuelta de la esquina de la célebre Maison des Amis du Livre, de su amiga Adrienne Monnier. Sylvia Beach, al saber los problemas censoriales de Joyce, empezó a actuar como su propagandista, buscándole el apoyo de la crítica francesa. Ante todo, hizo leer el Retrato a Valéry Larbaud,
comprensivo y abierto a diversas literaturas del mundo —en España, Gabriel Miró y Ramón Gómez de la Serna disfrutaron de su aplauso y su amistad—, aparte de fino creador él mismo —su Fermina Márquez es una de esas novelas menores que no se olvidan. Larbaud, impresionado por el Retrato, quiso conocer al autor, lo cual organizó hábilmente Sylvia Beach en una fiesta navideña, cantando carols en cordial reunión: allí, Larbaud pidió los capítulos de Ulises ya aparecidos en revista. Apenas recibidos, escribió a Sylvia Beach: “Estoy leyendo Ulises. En realidad, no puedo leer otra cosa, no puedo ni pensar en otra cosa”. Acabada la lectura, una semana después, volvía a escribir: “Estoy loco delirante por Ulises. Desde que leí a Whitman, a mis 18 años, ningún libro me ha entusiasmado tanto… ¡Es prodigioso! Tan grande como Rabelais: el señor Bloom es inmortal como Falstaff”. Y se puso a traducir unos fragmentos para la Nouvelle Revue Française. Esto ocurría un poco antes de la condena judicial en Nueva York: al producirse ésta, Sylvia Beach decidió editar ella misma Ulises en París, tarea a la que iba a dedicar sus próximos años, bien absorbidos por las exigencias y meticulosidades de Joyce: el rechazo judicial angloamericano contrastaba con la devoción sin límites de aquella mujer —devoción a Ulises, no a todo lo de su autor sin discriminación: cuando conoció Finnegans Wake lo definió sarcásticamente con un juego de palabras también muy joyceano, como a
Wholesale Safety–Pun Factory, con alusión a safety–pin: “una fábrica de juegos de palabras de seguridad [imperdibles] al por mayor”. Para ayudar a la
financiación del libro, se buscaron mil suscriptores de una primera edición de lujo, cuya lista incluía nombres tan curiosos como el de Winston Churchill. En cambio, Bernard Shaw, después de contestar a la petición haciendo un gran elogio de lo que había leído de Joyce, concluía: “Pero no conoce usted lo que es un irlandés, y de edad, si cree que está dispuesto a pagar 150 francos por un libro”. La impresión se anunciaba compleja —ya la copia a máquina había sido épica: Joyce empezó por pedir seis juegos de pruebas, en todos los cuales se lanzó a hacer añadidos y correcciones que a menudo extraviaba y enredaba, también por culpa de su vista, cada vez peor. (Todavía en 1975 no se dispone de un texto de Ulises limpio de errores: hay noticias de que se prepara para antes de 1980, ¡en Alemania!) Además, el impresor de Sylvia Beach, Darantière, estaba en Dijon, con los consiguientes enredos de envíos y comunicaciones. Y lo más curioso es que, a todo esto, el libro no estaba terminado: Joyce tenía aún pendiente mucho trabajo en los capítulos finales mientras corregía pruebas de los primeros. Y, para acabar de complicar, Joyce estaba empeñado en que el libro saliera el día que él cumplía cuarenta años —y ya adelantamos que lo consiguió: gracias al maquinista del tren de Dijon, pudo festejar su cumpleaños con un ejemplar de esa edición, para cuya cubierta se había ido ensayando cuidadosamente el color hasta lograr el azul que, como fondo de la tipografía en blanco, representaba para Joyce lo griego —mar y espuma, y la bandera griega—, así como, quizá, la ropa interior de Gerty MacDowell en [13]. Las reediciones se fueron sucediendo con frecuencia y regularidad. Empezó entonces la ridícula historia de los intentos de introducir Ulises en los países de lengua inglesa —aparte de los ejemplares contrabandeados por turistas o filtrados por correo. Harriet Shaw Weaver, invocando contratos previos con Joyce, se puso de acuerdo con Shakespeare & Co. para que la segunda y sucesivas ediciones llevaran el sello de The Egoist Press, aunque inevitablemente impresas en Francia: de los 2000 ejemplares de la segunda, se envían a Nueva York 500, confiando en el país de la libertad, pero son quemados todos: la tercera edición consta de 500 ejemplares, enviados a Inglaterra y confiscados —todos menos uno— por los aduaneros. Las ediciones 4ª a 12ª vuelven a tener el sello de Shakespeare & Co.: en 1932, una firma surgida en Hamburgo bajo el apropiado nombre The Odyssey Press se hace cargo del libro —de la 13ª edición, en dos volúmenes, impresa en Leipzig, es nuestro ejemplar. A todo esto, en 1926, un editor poco escrupuloso de Nueva York lleva a cabo la ocurrencia de editar Ulises, jurídicamente mostrenco, en entregas mensuales de una revista, suprimiendo todo lo que pudiera ofender los castos ojos postales. Se organiza una protesta firmada por escritores de diversos países —muchos de los cuales, sin duda, no habían leído el libro; así, Unamuno.

Comienzan también las traducciones, ante todo la alemana, luego la francesa, de compleja elaboración en grupo (“traduction d’Auguste Morel revue par
Valéry Larbaud, Stuart Gilbert et l’auteur”), que, a fuerza de argot, exagera y aun desvía el sentido del estilo original; la checa; dos japonesas en 1930 —año en que sale el libro de Stuart Gilbert, James Joyce’s “Ulysses” en que cita abundantemente el prohibido texto, ensalzándolo como obra maestra. Poco a poco, la situación parece madura para una prueba legal en los tribunales norteamericanos, que se provoca en 1933 enviando un ejemplar por correo y avisando a las autoridades para que lo confisquen. El juez neoyorquino de la causa, J. M. Woolsey, admitió el libro en un veredicto con coartadas de buena gracia literaria: “Respecto a las repetidas emersiones del tema sexual en las mentes de los personajes, debe recordarse siempre que el ambiente era céltico y su estación la primavera”. Y añadía “Me doy cuenta sobradamente de que, debido a ciertas escenas, Ulises es un trago más bien fuerte para pedir que lo tomen ciertas personas sensitivas, aunque normales. Pero mi meditada opinión, tras larga reflexión, es que, si bien en diversos pasajes el efecto de Ulises en el lector es sin duda un tanto emético [vomitivo], en ningún lugar tiende a ser afrodisíaco”. Random House lanza entonces rápidamente el libro: en vano la autoridad fiscal lleva el asunto a un tribunal superior, cuya mayoría también admite el libro.

Todavía hubo que esperar a otoño de 1936 para que Inglaterra permitiera la edición del libro proscrito (y es curioso que su entusiástico admirador T. S.
Eliot, por miedo, perdiera la oportunidad de que lo sacara la editorial de que él era asesor). No es mera curiosidad retrospectiva señalar, con forzosa brevedad, cómo se fue viendo y enjuiciando Ulises. Y es ésta una historia que, significativamente, empieza antes incluso de la publicación del libro: ya Valéry Larbaud lo anunció en París, en resonante conferencia de diciembre de 1921 —recogida en la Nouvelle Revue Française de abril siguiente, junto con la traducción de un fragmento—, bajo la óptica de la referencia a la Odisea, clave comunicada por el propio autor a Larbaud, pero que el lector no encuentra en el libro, salvo en el título. En cambio, los primeros críticos ingleses, libres del esquema Odisea, fueron más al grano —y es de notar que recensionaban un libro de publicación prohibida en su propio país, auténtica propaganda de una mercancía de contrabando. Ya antes de la aparición de Ulises, en abril de 1921, basándose sólo en los capítulos publicados en la Little Review, R. Aldington, en English Review, había preludiado, a elegante altura, el general conflicto de sentimientos de la crítica británica —admiración literaria, susto ante la total franqueza sin tapujos—: …cuando el Sr. Joyce, con sus dones maravillosos, los usa para darnos asco de la humanidad, hace algo que es falso y calumnioso para la humanidad… Ha logrado escribir un libro muy notable, pero desde el punto de vista de la vida humana, estoy seguro de que está equivocado. Y el crítico se asusta de pensar lo que serán los imitadores de Joyce: Él produce asco con una razón; otros producirán asco sin razón. Él es oscuro y justifica su oscuridad, pero ¿cuántos otros escribirán mera confusión pensando que es sublime?… Él no es uno de esos superficiales que adoptan un artificio superficial como canon de una nueva forma de arte; él caerá en manos de las capillitas, pero él mismo está muy por encima de ellas…

La primera recensión periodística (S. B. Mais, Daily Express, 25 marzo 1922) pone el dedo en la llaga: …La mayor parte de los escritores jóvenes desafían las reticencias convencionales en cuanto que describen todo lo que la mayor parte de nosotros hacemos y decimos. Mr. Joyce va mucho más lejos: de sus páginas saltan hacia nosotros todos nuestros más secretos e inconvenientes pensamientos íntimos. Incluso un recensionador anónimo (Evening News, 8 abril 1922) sabe mirar de frente Ulises: Mr. Joyce es tan cruel e inexorable como Zola con la pobre humanidad. Su estilo está en la nueva vena cinematográfica a la moda, muy sacudido y elíptico. El primer estudio realmente importante es el de J. Middleton Murry (Nation and Atheneum, 22 abril 1922), quien, después de dejar a un lado las objeciones moralistas (“la cabeza que sea bastante fuerte como para leer Ulises no se dejará trastornar por él”), apunta a algo literariamente esencial en el libro: su naturaleza humorística: Esta bufonería trascendental, esta súbita irrupción de la vis comica en un mundo donde se encarna la trágica incompatibilidad de lo práctico y lo instintivo, es un logro muy grande. Ese es el centro vital del libro de Mr. Joyce, y la intensidad de vida que contiene basta para animar su totalidad… Especial agudeza mostró también la recensión de Holbrook Jackson (To-Day, junio 1922): [Ulises] es un insulto y un logro. No es indecente. No hay en él una sola línea sucia. Sencillamente está desnudo… No es ni moral ni inmoral. Mr. Joyce escribe, no como si la moral no hubiera existido nunca, sino como quien deliberadamente prescinde de códigos y convenciones morales. Una franqueza como la suya habría sido imposible si no hubiera estado prohibida tal franqueza… Él es el primer narrador no–romántico, pues, al fin y al cabo, los realistas no eran más que románticos que trataban de liberarse del medievalismo… No pretende divertir, como George Moore,… ni criticar, como Meredith, ni satirizar, como Swift. Sencillamente, anota, como Homero, o incluso Froissart. Esta actitud tiene sus peligros. Mr. Joyce se ha enfrentado con ellos, o, mejor dicho, ha hecho como si no existieran. Ha sido totalmente lógico. Lo ha anotado todo… Unos meses después, W. B. Yeats, en un debate público en Dublín, además de declarar a Joyce “el escritor más original e influyente de nuestro tiempo”,
dijo que Ulises llegaba al “alcance último del realismo”. Por su parte, Ezra Pound (Mercure de France, junio 1922), hablando de Flaubert, se refería a Joyce en cuanto flaubertiano, no sólo en su sentido del arte estilístico, sino en su realismo crítico, especialmente irritado por la estupidez humana, trazando un paralelo entre Bloom y Bouvard–Pécuchet. Esta observación de Pound fue deformada como objeción por Edmund Wilson, dentro de un ensayo (en New Republic, 1922) que sigue siendo, por lo demás, una de las grandes piezas de la crítica joyceana. Wilson, en realidad, no nombra a Pound al poner su observación junto a la obtusa incomprensión de un novelista rastrero como era Arnold Bennett: No puedo estar de acuerdo con Mr. Arnold Bennett en que J. J. tenga un colosal resentimiento contra la humanidad. Me parece que lo que le choca a Mr. Bennett es que Mr. Joyce haya dicho toda la verdad. Fundamentalmente, Ulises no es en absoluto como Bouvard et Pécuchet (como algunos han intentado defender). Flaubert viene a decir que nos va a demostrar que la humanidad es mezquina enumerando todas las bajezas de que ha sido capaz. Pero Joyce, incluyendo todas las bajezas, hace que sus figuras burguesas conquisten nuestra comprensión y respeto dejándonos ver en ellas los dolores de parto de la mente humana siempre esforzándose por perpetuarse y perfeccionarse, y del cuerpo siempre trabajando y palpitando para hacer surgir alguna belleza desde su sombra. Edmund Wilson, después, entraría por primera vez a plantear el gran problema que hay en la valoración de la expresión joycena, el contraste entre un lado magistralmente sólido —la
… (más)
 
Denunciada
ferperezm | 3 reseñas más. | Mar 1, 2023 |
Durante la Primera Guerra Mundial James Joyce vivió en Zúrich, dedicado por completo a la creación del Ulises. En 1920 se trasladó a París, donde terminó y publicó su obra en 1922. El título evoca al protagonista de la Odisea de Homero, cuyo hilo argumental es seguido por Joyce con un sentido irónico y burlesco. Esta nueva odisea está protagonizada por un hombre de clase media, Leopold Bloom, que tiene que afrontar asuntos problemáticos relacionados con la familia, la lglesia y el Estado a lo largo de 24 horas que dura el relato. Uno de los mayores logros de la novela es el monólogo interior, tanto del personaje central (al estilo del examen de conciencia jesuítico) como de su esposa, Molly Bloom.… (más)
 
Denunciada
Natt90 | 336 reseñas más. | Feb 28, 2023 |

Listas

AP Lit (1)
Reiny (1)
100 (1)
Teens (1)
Books (1)
1930s (1)
my (1)
Read (2)
1920s (1)
Europe (2)
1910s (2)

Premios

También Puede Gustarte

Autores relacionados

Richard Ellmann Contributor, Preface, Editor
Robert Penn Warren Contributor
Herman Melville Contributor
William Faulkner Contributor
Mark Twain Contributor
Vatsyayana Contributor
George Gissing Contributor
Susan Coolidge Contributor
John Cleland Contributor
Grant Allen Contributor
Mary Shelley Contributor
Charles Dickens Contributor
Jr. Horatio Alger Contributor
Walter Scott Contributor
Lucius Apuleius Contributor
Maxim Gorky Contributor
H. Rider Haggard Contributor
Arthur Morrison Contributor
Benjamin Disraeli Contributor
Hollis Godfrey Contributor
George Sand Contributor
Arthur Conan Doyle Contributor
H. G. Wells Contributor
D. H. Lawrence Contributor
Edgar Allan Poe Contributor
H. P. Lovecraft Contributor
Alexandre Dumas Contributor
L. Frank Baum Contributor
Thomas Mann Contributor
Jules Verne Contributor
G.K. Chesterton Contributor
Victor Hugo Contributor
Bram Stoker Contributor
Marcel Proust Contributor
Daniel Defoe Contributor
Jack London Contributor
Jane Austen Contributor
Margaret Cavendish Contributor
Jonathan Swift Contributor
Pieter Harting Contributor
Upton Sinclair Contributor
Stendhal Contributor
Elizabeth Gaskell Contributor
Dale Carnegie Contributor
Nikolai Gogol Contributor
O. Henry Contributor
Wilkie Collins Contributor
Rebecca West Contributor
Marcus Aurelius Contributor
T. S. Eliot Introduction
Tim Ahern Illustrator
Richard Ellman Contributor
Graham Greene Contributor
Joseph Conrad Contributor
Henry James Contributor
John Ritter Contributor
Alan Steinberg Contributor
Graham Chapman Contributor
Andrei Codrescu Contributor
David Pallone Contributor
Gabriel Byrne Contributor
Michael York Contributor
Julian T. Smith Contributor
J. N. Monk Author
H.V. Jinks Author
W.S. Garth Author
Elspeth Read Contributor, Author
W.H. Bett Author
G.L Gundry Author
Padraic Colum Introduction
Fritz Senn Editor, Afterword
Harry Levin Editor, Introduction, Notes
Terence Brown Editor, Selected by
Glenway Wescott Contributor
Nikolay Gogol Contributor
Conor Deane Translator
Maud Jackson Activities by
Luigi Schenoni Translator
Andrew Thompson Selected by
Margaret Rose Selected by
Derek Sellen Adapted by
Fabio Pedone Translator
Enrico Terrinoni Translator
Jo Davidson Illustrator
Erik Bindervoet Translator
Klaus Reichert Translator, Editor
Robin Jacques Cover artist, Illustrator
Seamus Deane Contributor, Editor
Jim Norton Narrator
Dieter E. Zimmer Translator
Anna Thalbach Narrator
Imogen Kogge Narrator
Klaus Buhlert Director
Mon Nys Translator
Wolfram Koch Narrator
Hugh Kenner Introduction
Thomas Warburton Translator
Edith Clever Narrator
John Vandenbergh Translator
Paul Claes Translator
Erik Andersson Translator
Toon Tellegen Afterword
RTÉ Players Narrator
Iglika Vasileva Translator
Declan Kiberd Introduction
Richard Hamilton Cover artist
Oleksandr Terek Translator
Hans Wollschläger Übersetzer
Udo Samel Narrator
Cedric Watts Introduction
Leevi Lehto Translator
Axel Milberg Narrator
Jacques Aubert Introduction
John M. Woolsey Contributor
Peter Matic Narrator
Mimmo Paladino Illustrator
Sophie Rois Narrator
John Lee Narrator
Dámaso Alonso Translator
Tommy Olofsson Translator
Cesare Pavese Translator
Richard Brown Introduction
Leo Knuth Translator
Dodie Masterman Illustrator
Brian Keogh; Illustrator
James S. Atherton Introduction
Aloys Skoumal Translator
Hugh Kerner Introduction
Ebba Atterbom Translator
Gerry O'Brien Narrator
Franca Cancogni Translator
Apfel Zet Cover designer
Tadhg Hynes Narrator
J. J. Clarke Photographer
Gerard Doyle Narrator
Colum McCann Foreword
T.P. McKenna Narrator
Roman Muradov Cover artist
Willy Fleckhaus Cover designer
César Abin Cover artist
Jacques Janssen Cover designer
John Bishop Introduction
Bertil Falk Translator
Augustus Edwin John Cover artist
Cyril Cusack Narrator
Geert Lernout Translator, Preface
Don Gifford Introduction
Nicholas Tamblyn Illustrator
Peggy Diggs Illustrator
Kevin J. H. Dettmar Introduction
Mario Praz Introduction
Alvin Lustig Cover designer
Ruud Hisgen Translator
Gerald Rose Illustrator
Sandra Higashi Illustrator
Naoki Yanase Translator
Georges Borach Contributor
R.F. Mack Contributor
G.A. Neidenberger Cover artist
Dennis S. Gill Contributor
Louise Maude Translator
Dieter Waltring Contributor
Anthony Spit Contributor
A.K. Terry Contributor
G.S. Palmer Contributor
Aylmer Maude Translator
Roy Brook Contributor
J. B. Phillips Translator
Ian L Cormack Contributor

Estadísticas

Obras
511
También por
96
Miembros
84,261
Popularidad
#133
Valoración
3.9
Reseñas
953
ISBNs
2,582
Idiomas
41
Favorito
433

Tablas y Gráficos